Check out this old LP!

58 special

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Maybe 71 not 61. Only one or two 1961 non SG style Les Paul's. Embossed serial# is later. Ink stamped would be what older guitars had.
I think I can make out the 3 piece neck, but that might be a reflection .
I think that is a Norlin era guitar.
Very nice looking guitar by the way. Is there a picture of the side to see if it has a pancake body.
 

58 special

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My limited knowledge has got me confused with this one.
No volute unless its been shaved off.
Somebody with more knowledge than me will figure out exactly what you have.
 

mudface

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The fretboard inlays look correct for a 1960 BB... a possible late '60 that got a pressed serial number.??
 

mudface

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Knobs would be witch hats and the last three block mop inlays in the upper frets would graduate smaller in size on a 1968.
 

Lee Phillips

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All the serial numbers would have had to be stamped even now. Only a fake or stolen would have ever had it removed. Any Gibson electric without the stamped serial number on it is suspect and should be immediately passed on unless you are wishing to take it a part and look at all the composite serial numbers to find who the Guitar legitimately belongs to, if a fake just the same turn them in. Too many have had instruments stolen or taken by buying fakes.
 

mrblooze

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'68-'69. The lack of the dot above the "i" is a dead giveaway.
Agree about the missing dot. Same as my '71. But in the one picture of the back side, I see a volute, vaguely. If so, no earlier than '69. '68 didn't have a volute, that came back in '69.
 

rockstar232007

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Agree about the missing dot. Same as my '71. But in the one picture of the back side, I see a volute, vaguely. If so, no earlier than '69. '68 didn't have a volute, that came back in '69.
The shape of the headstock is also a great clue.

Most early-mid '70s headstocks have a slightly different shape.
 

DBDM

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was scrolling down to say "No volute". @58 special already mentioned it. At first glance I thought it had one but zooming in reveals not. Shape to me looks like it should, so I am currently favoring that it has been shaved off.
 

DBDM

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After coming back to this several times, I am voting that this guitar is an early 70s model that has had a headstock repair which included sanding down the volute. If not that, then something similar as it looks like an early 70s from behind that SHOULD have a Volute.

As an aside, I have however heard reports (not confirmed) of some very few 1972 models (SG and LP) that did NOT have a volute. I have never seen one online and none of the people reporting them have posted photos. Usually some version of "I used to have a 72 that...." I can neither confirm these existed nor do I deny this is a possibility.
 

truckermde

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Nice mystery.

Whatever it is, it's dreamy! I'd LOVE to rock that!!

:cheers2:
 

DBDM

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Nice mystery.

Whatever it is, it's dreamy! I'd LOVE to rock that!!

:cheers2:
Although I love (as much as the next guy) the pristine Vintage and new look, I have a strange fascination with the "players grade" guitars. I do not mind honest wear and love the thought that if I pick it up and move it and bang it against the wall or amp or it falls over, "who cares". Take it to the beach with a cheap battery powered amp or toss it in the trunk without a case--"fine". Couple that look and mindset with a really great playing guitar--I love it! I like to troll pawnshops (in Nashville where I live) and start in the corners, NOT where the spotlight shines. That is my mo.


Many times I have found that there is a reason why well loved guitars have been "well loved" and it is frequently NOT because they suck. Some of my little "finds" are among the best instruments I have ever played. Half the time I walk in with a "find" and my now-18 year old takes one look, plugs it in, and instantly commandeers the find. NO way I can exaggerate how many times I have said, "can I plug in that Tele?" and the pawn shop onwner says--"oh that old thing?" I have $150 dollars in that--Ill sell it to you for $200." Plug it in--(to myself) "Oh. wow"" to him--"how about $175?" while thinking "man I would pay $750 for this little guy!"
I have several nice pristine collectables and I play them--but I secretely value the players too!

Below is the afore mentioned Tele?Esquire--some call it a "Tele-Gib". The wear did not photograph well. The mods were NOT done by an elite luthier. The neck is worn and not original to the body (but an original Fender). The neck pickup is an unknown maker, the bridge is a Bill Lawrence. I bought it for the parts, not to keep. Does not look like much....But plug it in and you will see!
We have about 20 (ish. 20+) guitars and the one pictured below is the one (I said he could have any of them) that my 18 year old took to college. Guess the apple does not fall far.
 

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truckermde

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I like to troll pawnshops (in Nashville where I live) and start in the corners, NOT where the spotlight shines. That is my mo.
Many times I have found that there is a reason why well loved guitars have been "well loved" and it is frequently NOT because they suck. Some of my little "finds" are among the best instruments I have ever played.
Yeah, Man!

I'm always suspicious when an older guitar is in unplayed condition.

Sure, some folks buy guitars because they're pretty, and just never play them, but more often, an unplayed guitar is passed over for the owner's better offerings.

On the other hand, I am usually able to rectify the guitar's shortcomings, as guitars are more adjustable than some people seem to realize.

Either way, I can have a predatory streak, if I sense the seller's inexperience, although I do stop short of being dishonest. I live in a small, rural community, and may encounter that seller as a buyer in the future.

It always pays to be decent...
 

JPP

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In 1968 I had my brand new LP Custom Black Beauty. Also named frettles wonder because of the very low frets.
See picture in my sig.
One piece neck no valute and a one piece body. Wavelback tuners, which hat knobs and nylon bridge inserts.
Unfortunately it was stolen in 1971.
I also used to own a 1971 in Sunburst replacing the stolen BB. Over the years I played the frets down.The fretboard was damaged because of a bad fret job and I traded it in when I bought a new LP. Actually I own an 1974.
Both had the valute, three piece neck and "pan cake" body.
The S/N´s had 6 digits. The first digit is important to find out the year of manufacture.
Unfortunately the first digit can not be seen on the photo ?
Relevant points for identification of an LP Customs after 1968 during the Norlin aera:
- No dot on the i
- 3 piece neck with valute
- 3 piece (pan cake) body. If not visible from outside it should be seen inside the pick up cavity.
 
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DBDM

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It always pays to be decent...
Agreed. I never take advantage of an individual. In a store, however, I negotiate my best. In auctions, I feel free to win at the lowest possible price even if it nearly borders on a crime. Full disclosure--when I bought the above pictured "Tele Gib" I was buying it for parts with no intention of it being a GREAT one. I did not even plug it in to see if it worked. It was not tillI got it home that I knew I had a treasure
 

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