Chappers Epi Les Paul Florentine review

straybeat

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Hey All,

As always I don't know if I'm late with this, but it showed up in my inbox this week, sooo...

It's Chapper's and the Captain's review of the ELP Florentine and they liked it! (Of course they did, they want to sell them :laugh2:) They thought it was darker and richer sounding than a regular LP. I'm surprised, I thought it would be the opposite?

It's 27 minutes total (with some of the other Limited Editions thrown in). And Malikon, they have the Wildkat at about 19:30 (Chappers: "It's like a cross between Neil Young and Richie Samboro, isn't it?" :laugh2:), but here ya go;

[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sr1XQ53zT8g&feature=em-subs_digest[/ame]
 

Malikon

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Wildkat sounds great.

Wasn't digging the sound of the Florentines too much,...actually they don't sound at all like I thought they would.

...granted it's one recording so who knows how it'd be in person.
 

Roshy Boy

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I have one coming today. I couldn't resist.
It's a Honeyburst. It's on the big brown truck and out for delivery.
Pics and a review will be forthcoming next week.
This is two Epi's in a month. First a 56GT and now this. I swore off collecting guitars too.

Darn you Epiphone. Why do you tempt me?
 

cybermgk

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Wildkat sounds great.

Wasn't digging the sound of the Florentines too much,...actually they don't sound at all like I thought they would.

...granted it's one recording so who knows how it'd be in person.
Wildkats do sound good. And, they have the kind of neck you have said recently you like. Almost bought one twice. The do squeal quite a bit under high gain, and need some simple mods to tone that down.
 

KelvinS1965

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I popped in their shop last week and was disappointed I didn't see either Chappers or the Captain. I did have a drool over some of the nice guitars in the shop though, before going back to work. :)
 

Roshy Boy

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Quick update. It's here. First impression, it is absolutely gorgeous. Honeyburst with perfect flame. Super light weight to. I'll bet it's under 7 lbs. They did not attach the pickguard either, which is great. I would not want to hide the beautiful top on this. And there are no holes. I can't wait to get it home and play it over the weekend.
 

Roshy Boy

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Second impressions of my Florentine. FANTASTIC.:D Just spent about an hour and a half with it.

It is a true work of art. Did a quick set up with pickup adjustments. They were a bit too low. The neck is definitely quite a bit thinner than the '56GT. But it's very - very - very easy to play. They guys in the video did a good job describing it. I also don't necessarily agree with it being bassier or darker than a Standard LP. But it definitely has the Les Paul sound you would expect at a much lighter weight.

I'm never clear on hollow vs. semi-hollow. Casinos are hollow. Dots are semi hollow. That's about all I know. I took the back cover off the pots to peak inside. It's hollow under the main body too. The block runs up to the tail piece. Then after that, it's hollow. I reached my finger as far as I could. It's very well made. I'm guessing they hollow out the body and then glue the top on?

The sounds this can make are like the other LP Pro's with coil splits. The difference I see is there is a more airy tone on the cleaner settings. With distortion, everything sounds the same to me. Probably a generalization, but I think playing clean is where the sounds will vary more. Unplugged, there is some acoustical properties to it. Not a lot. But some.

It's made in Indonesia. Not sure that matters, but that's what the sticker says. The difference I see with it and my 56 (MIC) is the scarf joint. They're both at the headstock. But the Florentine is cut straight across where it meets the neck. The 56 dips down and is an oval where it meets the neck. Otherwise, the quality and workmanship is identical. As far as I'm concerned, both are perfect.

The 56GT review in the video was good too. It starts about 15 minutes into it. The only thing I disagreed with, well there were two things. He stated it has a maple cap. I don't think it does. At least the description on GC's web-site doesn't list it. It simply says - Mahogany body. The second item is the color of the gold changing. I don't see any greenish hues in mine at all. But the way the video with it's lighting, is an accurate view of it's color. I definitely agree with them about the neck. It's big.

So now I'm up to two Epi's. Both are fantastic. I think this will take care of my GAS for a while.
 

houston

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Hollows are built more like acoustics, top, back, and sides are thin pieces shaped and glued together. Semis start out like a solid body, the body is shaped, highly chambered, then the top added.

The Florentine has control plates on the back?
 

paruwi

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Hollows are built more like acoustics, top, back, and sides are thin pieces shaped and glued together. Semis start out like a solid body, the body is shaped, highly chambered, then the top added.

The Florentine has control plates on the back?
No Sir, the (underlined) statement is just wrong !





 

houston

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The way Epi does it is improper?:hmm:
Proper, as in an LP Florentine, PRS Semi, or Tele Thinline. A cool solid body turned into an equally, if not even cooler, semi.

Yes, of course a semi can be made from plywood (or recycled beer cans for that matter), but I say save the plywood for skateboards (and ramps!).
 

56GT

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Proper, as in an LP Florentine, PRS Semi, or Tele Thinline. A cool solid body turned into an equally, if not even cooler, semi.

Yes, of course a semi can be made from plywood (or recycled beer cans for that matter), but I say save the plywood for skateboards (and ramps!).

I rather have the plywood put to good use, and made into guitars.
I hate skateboards, and everything they stand for...


Rather have kids playing a guitar than being a menace to society with a skateboard...
 

paruwi

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Proper, as in an LP Florentine, PRS Semi, or Tele Thinline. A cool solid body turned into an equally, if not even cooler, semi.

Yes, of course a semi can be made from plywood (or recycled beer cans for that matter), but I say save the plywood for skateboards (and ramps!).
I don't think anybody knows for sure how the new Epi LP-forentines are built...

my guess would be kind of similar to the LP-Ultra or the Kat-series...





to me none of the above method is a typical Semi-Hollow construction

I'd describe it as ' heavily chambered Solid Body' = Semi-Solid :hmm:
 

LowThudd

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Proper, as in an LP Florentine, PRS Semi, or Tele Thinline. A cool solid body turned into an equally, if not even cooler, semi.

Yes, of course a semi can be made from plywood (or recycled beer cans for that matter), but I say save the plywood for skateboards (and ramps!).
Solidbody or Hollowbody ... Which is right for me?

In 1958, Gibson introduced the first “semi-hollowbody” guitar – the legendary ES-335. The ES-335 had double cutaways, a thinner body and – most importantly – a solid block of wood running through the center of the body, thus creating hollow “wings” on the sides. The primary advantage gained from this design was greater feedback resistance than that of a true hollowbody.
 

Brians Evil Twin

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Traditional archtop semi-hollow (ES-335 and all it's variants) and full hollow construction (L-5, ES-333, Casino, etc.) have laminated top and back glued to laminated sides.

Well OK, the L-5 and other high-end jazz guitars have a solid carved top, but the join method is nominally the same.



Semis have a center block that runs partially or fully from the neck to the bottom strap button.



However with the advent of CNC machines, it has become highly cost effective to use a semi-hollow construction method where a solid block of wood (not necessarily one piece) is routed out to form the back and sides, and the top is glued on (Tele Thinline, Wildkat, Midtown, etc.)





Both are technically semi-hollow, but there's not much acoustical difference between a routed body with a glued-on top and a solid body guitar IMO.

The Epi Florentine Pro is this second type of semi:

...Epiphone has added a new twist to this classic rocker by adding a gorgeous Flame Maple top with dual f-holes and a partially hollowed out body to give it an upscale look and a lighter, more resonant body.

The Epiphone Les Paul Standard Florentine PRO features a mahogany body that is carved out behind two traditional f-holes and AAA Flame Maple veneer top that delivers the classic LP tone and sustain, but with the hint of a semi-hollowbody guitar like a 335.
 

LowThudd

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5 Things About Hollow, Semi-Acoustic, and Chambered Electric Guitars | GuitarPlayer

5 CHAMBERED ELECTRICS

Hollow pockets are incorporated within the bodies of other electric guitars either as accidents of design, as tone enhancers, or simply to reduce weight. Think Gretsch Duo Jet, Nik Huber Redwood, Tom Anderson Hollow Drop Top, or contemporary Gibson Les Paul Standard. Most are constructed by routing out solid wood rather than assembling thinner wood stocks in an acoustic or semiacoustic framework. While our examples keep their chambers hidden, others such as Fender’s Thinline Telecaster or Koll’s Duo Glide include an f-hole to shout it loud and proud. Chambered electrics are the most solidbody-like of the bunch, tonally, but usually offer enhanced openness and breathiness in the midrange.
 

houston

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Rather have kids playing a guitar than being a menace to society with a skateboard...
Oy, no false choice there. And playing electric guitar meant one must be a devil worshiper, while getting a tattoo meant being either a sailor or gangster. I'd rather have kids get out and challenge themselves (mentally and physically), and not hit their teens looking like Les and BB sitting there. There's plenty of time in the day for both sports and music.

to me none of the above method is a typical Semi-Hollow construction
I'd describe it as ' heavily chambered Solid Body' = Semi-Solid


I agree it would be nice to have something in the nomenclature, but not sure that "half full" vs "half empty" is going to get us there. Not that "proper" or "not" will either, but if the question is how much plywood belongs in an LP...
 

paruwi

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..................

I agree it would be nice to have something in the nomenclature, but not sure that "half full" vs "half empty" is going to get us there. Not that "proper" or "not" will either, but if the question is how much plywood belongs in an LP...

Your logic would make nearly every new Gibson LesPaul a Semi-Hollow.....
 




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