Buffing wheels ??

ScotttheScot

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Hello some buffing questions ?
How many wheels course, fine, ultra fine .
Rouge’s??
I understand my post is pretty general but I would appreciate and pointers.
I have a nice old narrow Craftsman mandrel my father in law gave me.
I have an Emerson 1750 rpm motor, too many rpm ???
I’ve been told buffing is one of those processes you just need to practice learn from doing.
Thanks Scott
 

Skyjerk

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750 rpm is more like it.

1750 is fast if you are using 14" buffs. You'll overheat the finish. Can you change out pulleys you slow the wheel down, like a lot?

I have two 14" buffs. I think mine runs them somewhere between 700-750 rpm.
As you said, one is fine, the other extra fine.
I use menzerna compound.

I wet sand up to 800, and then straight to the fine wheel. Works great. Its not that hard to get it right. Just buff off the edges, not on. Keep the guitar moving and dont just sit there on one spot. Be extra careful on edges and corners you'll take the finish right off.
 
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LtDave32

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Chris, what grit componds do you use, and where are you getting them?
 

ScotttheScot

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Good old Skyjerk all ways comes up with the the goods ! The jokes I’m not sure of yet .
Guess I’ll have to use one of those pulley calculators on line.
I heard some guys polish at 1750 but once you burn the finish ,penny wise a pound foolish cause I was too cheep to go out and get different pulley .
Thanks man !
 

Skyjerk

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Chris, what grit componds do you use, and where are you getting them?

hey Dave. I got them from stewMac before they started selling their own colortone branded stuff.
its menzerna fine and extra fine. I bought a few bars of each like 8 years ago. Still working on those same bars :)
 

cmjohnson

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Never use one wheel for multiple grits. One wheel PER grit is really important if you want a finish with no scratches in it.

A 1750 RPM buffing wheel can be used but one mistake and you get a burn-thru. It's really tricky. MUCH safet to use 750 as Chris said.

The Stew-Mac buffer kit with the 14 inch buffs is really good. I wish I had that setup, but given how much use I'd get out of it, it's better than I don't. It would not easily earn its keep.

Esslinger has every compound you'll EVER need.

I have one hard buffing wheel that I use only for knives. I sharpen the blade with my Makita wet stone planer blade sharpening wheel, then (VERY CAREFULLY) buff the edge with green chrome polish on the hard buffing wheel, using a drag motion. (Sharp edge never ever points toward the wheel.) This gives a mirror smooth polished edge that snaps hairs off almost before the blade touches the hair. It goes beyond merely "scary sharp".
 

Skyjerk

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Never use one wheel for multiple grits. One wheel PER grit is really important if you want a finish with no scratches in it.

A 1750 RPM buffing wheel can be used but one mistake and you get a burn-thru. It's really tricky. MUCH safet to use 750 as Chris said.

The Stew-Mac buffer kit with the 14 inch buffs is really good. I wish I had that setup, but given how much use I'd get out of it, it's better than I don't. It would not easily earn its keep.

Esslinger has every compound you'll EVER need.

I have one hard buffing wheel that I use only for knives. I sharpen the blade with my Makita wet stone planer blade sharpening wheel, then (VERY CAREFULLY) buff the edge with green chrome polish on the hard buffing wheel, using a drag motion. (Sharp edge never ever points toward the wheel.) This gives a mirror smooth polished edge that snaps hairs off almost before the blade touches the hair. It goes beyond merely "scary sharp".

might have to try that on one of my knives. I have an extra buff and a lot of knives yet to forge :)

I currently start the edge on my belt grinder with a 400 grit belt and then use the wicked edge system to get it the rest of the way. Definitely shaving sharp. Can’t hurt to see if I can get even sharper :)
 

cmjohnson

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The Makita planer blade sharpener is a flat wet wheel. I'm using the standard 1000 grit stone and it really does a fantastic job. Use water with a drop of soap added to keep the wheel from loading while sharpening your blade.

It's not really cheap but if I wore out the machine and its motor would no longer run and the body rusted out, I'd buy another. It's that good.

I dress the wheel with cheap Harbor Freight diamond grit sharpening stones. Keeping that wheel flat is really important if you are actually going to use it to sharpen planer blades. (Which I have done.)
 

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