Broken lug on switchcraft 3-way toggle.

SpeedyGonzo

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Hi,
On my switchcraft toggle, the lug where you connect and solder the bridge wire has split off (maybe too much heat applied with my iron).
Is there a way to fix this? Maybe if I unscrew the base and join the broken lug to it’s metal plate with some piece of aluminium foil? Or maybe a solder joint?
Don’t feel like buying a new one if it can be fixed. Any advice would help.
 

Jymbopalyse

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:welcome:

I admire your desire to fix it yourself. I'd just replace it.

Pictures of the problem would garner more useful reply's, fur sure.

Give what you stated a try, and let us know how it goes.
What's the worst that could happen?


and don't forget.

:photos:
 

RichBurst59

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Maybe, if you make a loop ...like a hairpin loop end , from 18 or 20 gauge solid copper wire.. 10-12mm long....and just loosen the screws on the switch tabs....slide it in with the busted tab, carefully tighten it back down....you then would have something to connect to. Or snip the flat solder tab off of another sacrificial switch or relay component and do likewise your back in biz.... don't forget, you can usually put a small metal alligator clip on your solder work as a heat sinck to absorb some heat away from caps, switches pots and the like.
Good luck with that!
 

cooljuk

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Those switches rely on the wafers and blades being straight and parallel to work. There are also insulating sleves that encompass the through-screws. If you loosen the screws and cram anything in there, you'd disk unreliable contacts.

It's a $20 part. How much is your guitar and time worth? Replace it.

If it's vintage, I can repair it for you, but I'm not going to waste even someone else's money on fixing a modern one.
 

cooljuk

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That said, if you have another broken one (I don't think I do or I'd offer to send it to you), you can put two together to make one that works.
 

RichBurst59

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Those switches rely on the wafers and blades being straight and parallel to work. There are also insulating sleves that encompass the through-screws. If you loosen the screws and cram anything in there, you'd disk unreliable contacts.

It's a $20 part. How much is your guitar and time worth? Replace it.

If it's vintage, I can repair it for you, but I'm not going to waste even someone else's money on fixing a modern one.
Ughhhh. ....Negative nannies abound. Maybe a person just looking for some advice can get the advice and makeup their own mind based on trial and error. And maybe some individuals can't just go get a new one. Every little thing we try to fix and succeed in fixing teaches us a valuable lesson Even when we fail at fixing something we learn a valuable lesson Just going and buying a new one isn't always the best fix.
 

MATTM

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Ughhhh. ....Negative nannies abound. Maybe a person just looking for some advice can get the advice and makeup their own mind based on trial and error. And maybe some individuals can't just go get a new one. Every little thing we try to fix and succeed in fixing teaches us a valuable lesson Even when we fail at fixing something we learn a valuable lesson Just going and buying a new one isn't always the best fix.
Oh please. I agree with James. It’s a $20 part. Some things simply aren’t worth the time, money or effort.

Sorry if you find truthfulness from people who know what they’re talking about offensive.
 

MATTM

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Maybe, if you make a loop ...like a hairpin loop end , from 18 or 20 gauge solid copper wire.. 10-12mm long....and just loosen the screws on the switch tabs....slide it in with the busted tab, carefully tighten it back down....you then would have something to connect to. Or snip the flat solder tab off of another sacrificial switch or relay component and do likewise your back in biz.... don't forget, you can usually put a small metal alligator clip on your solder work as a heat sinck to absorb some heat away from caps, switches pots and the like.
Good luck with that!
Sorry, but no. These switches are not made to be serviceable. What you're suggesting is just asking for problems.
 

ehb

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Throw the whole guitar away, it’s ruined.

Or buy the $20 part and replace it.

Wait.... Let me think....

Replace it.... Chalk it up to a learning experience.

One & Done Fix is the way to go......or you are guaranteed to revisit the issue.....
 

VictorB

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Ughhhh. ....Negative nannies abound.
It has nothing to do with being negative, it’s much easier to replace the entire thing and have it whole, than spend a ton of time rigging it together, only to have the possibly of it crapping out again.
 

MATTM

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It has nothing to do with being negative, it’s much easier to replace the entire thing and have it whole, than spend a ton of time rigging it together, only to have the possibly of it crapping out again.
This.
 

ehb

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A compromised part is a compromised part.

Any compromised part with moving internals is a Murphy....
 

cooljuk

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Ughhhh. ....Negative nannies abound. Maybe a person just looking for some advice can get the advice and makeup their own mind based on trial and error. And maybe some individuals can't just go get a new one. Every little thing we try to fix and succeed in fixing teaches us a valuable lesson Even when we fail at fixing something we learn a valuable lesson Just going and buying a new one isn't always the best fix.
Oh, I'm all about DIY! I feed my family off DIY.

...the difference between you and I is that I posted two solutions that would result in a working switch and you posted zero working solutions.

Your ideas are great if you want to muck around and experiment for yourself, learning through failure (nothing wrong with that) but, as someone who has actually worked on these switches, perhaps hundreds of times, I can see why they wouldn't work and it would just be a waste of time for the OP, perhaps further damaging his switch. He asked for a working solution, not how he might learn about mechanics and ingenuity at the expense of his equipment. There are other working options. I shared them.
 

Roxy13

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Gotoh switches made in Japan are a nice alternative as well if you don't want to pay for another Switchcraft. The Gotohs are a little bit cheaper although the ground lug is on the back of the switch and the output lugs to the jack are in between the neck and bridge pickup lugs, so you have to pay attention to that working with different brands of switches.

I had a luthier recently tell me that Gotoh switches are garbage, but the only failure I've had on one happened last year and it was on a 1977 guitar. So it lasted fine for 42 years! I also have other guitars from 1977, 1979 and 1982 that still have their original switches in them.

 

cooljuk

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Gotoh switches made in Japan are a nice alternative as well if you don't want to pay for another Switchcraft. The Gotohs are a little bit cheaper although the ground lug is on the back of the switch and the output lugs to the jack are in between the neck and bridge pickup lugs, so you have to pay attention to that working with different brands of switches.

I had a luthier recently tell me that Gotoh switches are garbage, but the only failure I've had on one happened last year and it was on a 1977 guitar. So it lasted fine for 42 years! I also have other guitars from 1977, 1979 and 1982 that still have their original switches in them.

There was a time where I was getting contact failures in the short Switchcrafts, so the Gotohs were used for guitars that needed short ones, but not L styles. Never had a problem with the Gotohs. I don't do too much work that needs the short straight types, compared to longs, though.
 

MATTM

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Gotoh switches made in Japan are a nice alternative as well if you don't want to pay for another Switchcraft. The Gotohs are a little bit cheaper although the ground lug is on the back of the switch and the output lugs to the jack are in between the neck and bridge pickup lugs, so you have to pay attention to that working with different brands of switches.

I had a luthier recently tell me that Gotoh switches are garbage, but the only failure I've had on one happened last year and it was on a 1977 guitar. So it lasted fine for 42 years! I also have other guitars from 1977, 1979 and 1982 that still have their original switches in them.

I actually found the short frame Gotoh switch to be better made than the Switchcraft counterpart.
 

Roxy13

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Sometimes it's hard to fit the long Switchcraft in some of the MIJ guitars even with the deep nut. So I either have to get the hole for the switch reamed out large enough and/or use a dremel to thin the wood on the top inside the switch cavity. In that case it's just easier to use the Gotoh one.
 

RichBurst59

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Oh, I'm all about DIY! I feed my family off DIY.

...the difference between you and I is that I posted two solutions that would result in a working switch and you posted zero working solutions.

Your ideas are great if you want to muck around and experiment for yourself, learning through failure (nothing wrong with that) but, as someone who has actually worked on these switches, perhaps hundreds of times, I can see why they wouldn't work and it would just be a waste of time for the OP, perhaps further damaging his switch. He asked for a working solution, not how he might learn about mechanics and ingenuity at the expense of his equipment. There are other working options. I shared them.
50 plus instruments have passed thru me some deep fixes some light fixes each resulting in " thanks " and appreciation. Your validation is not required in the least, to prove or disprove a single aspect the presence of anything. If you were paying attention............the poster inquired about REPAIR. YOU went to replace. Hobbies ..... are Without Question the precise place in the world where we muck around and we truly enjoy it. I'm fine with however anyone chooses to live their existence But I'm just diggin on enjoying the ride ..... maybe more, than I am with the destination. OUT.
 


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