Boutiques dont impress

bulletproof

aka tarddoggy
V.I.P. Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2011
Messages
13,027
Reaction score
33,703
Now,just like with anything,we all got our picks and preferences. I always like to encourage the willingness to experiment(within ones financial means)with as many different pickups as one can.
Simply amazing how one pickup(s)can sound in a guitar and then completely different in another.
I honestly have no idea what the Holy Grail would be,however,in this particular instance in time and with so many great winders out there, I am inclined to experiment as much as possible. Again,just my 2cents y’all....
 

Brewdude

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2014
Messages
1,137
Reaction score
2,201
@bulletproof that is just entirely too reasonable an opinion for an online forum:run:


Seriously, if you are happy with a set of pickups, by all means, enjoy the hell out of them. Some people nerd out over pieces of aged plastic, for some its amps, some pickups. Whatever floats your boat. I love the chase of finding the right pickup to match each guitar I own but totally respect how some people are totally fine with stock ones.
 

Antigua

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 15, 2016
Messages
628
Reaction score
225
Boutiques offer variety. As someone who thinks of pickups as electrical components, having only a small handful of spec points from the big name makers is like having to choose between a .047 cap or a .022 cap, and not being offered anything in between. Boutiques broaden the variety, although they tend to cost more, so it makes sense to try the less costly offerings on the market first, and know all there is to know about the specs, so that you don't accidentally buy the same pickup twice.

It's also good to know that a pickup is part of a larger passive circuit that includes the guitar cable, so if a pickup is too dark, try a low capacitance cable, and plug straight into the amp to make sure any pedals aren't to blame for unsatisfactory tone. Similarly, the most prominent change you get from different magnet types is change in the magnetic circuit, and raising and lowering the pickup also changes the magnetic circuit, so it's important not to overlook these things before you spend money on pickups. With all the hype and hysteria about pickups on the internet, it can be tempting to skip the basics and immediately order a set of new pickups.
 

B5Erik

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2012
Messages
690
Reaction score
519
Believe me I dont just throw subjective opinions around. Just because I havn't purchased or tried any personally...does not equate to zero analysis done. Iv'e been playing humbuckers for long long time... and I do have friends....and youtube! So yes I've checked some out... and I don't disagree that some sound pretty good.... It's just nothing is driving me to do it, because I like what I got. the hocus-pocus comment is to folks who claim this or that is the holy grail and closest to an original you can get...blah blah... as we see with OP it's not quite that simple.... and I agree with him on the BB's ....:eek2: :cheers2:
No, "Hocus pocus," with me - I had an Ibanez Iceman that sounded like harsh, shrill garbage, and then I put in a Guitarforce Superstar and it became my single best sounding guitar (and you can see in my sig how many I have). Since then I've gotten some ReWinds, some Vineham's, and a Wolfetone Marshallhead, and I don't know which sounds best.

Yes, sometimes stock pickups sound great in a guitar, and are a perfect match (like the ProBuckers in my Epi LP Trad Pro), but sometimes they sound like garbage or are just less than impressive. When replacing the ones that don't sound great I'm going with something that has more character than a mass produced pickup designed to be just a little on the generic side so they sound good in the maximum number of guitars through the maximum number of amps. Like I said, sometimes stock pickups are awesome, but sometimes they're not.
 

Dazza

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2009
Messages
706
Reaction score
640
To OP
You're R9 is an 07. I had an R7 from the same year and it came stock with brass tailpiece studs. Changing them to steel really helped my neck pickup with clarity. When I first swapped the studs over I noticed such a difference I immediately switched them back again to make sure what I was hearing was that obvious. It was like a fresh set of strings to an old dead set. I couldn't get over how such a simple change made such a difference. This may help in your case.

There's a whole world of posts concerning changing pots / caps to higher values too. It was commonplace with R's pre 2013 or so. Both my 07 /09 R's had pots changed and things improved.

Everyone has his own tastes but how you describe your experience with Wizz is the opposite to mine. I currently have Wizz in my CC Shanks and a JTM 45. The neck pu is very open and articulate and the overdrive sound is raunchy but clear. Very dynamic. I didn't like either BB set in my 07 /09 R's and found them too compressed in the mids and fizzy in the top and muddy low end. Not the open chime of a CB or these Wizz. The BB in my Warren Haynes 335 however sound much more like CB than the BB I had back then. I believe the winding pattern has changed along with a variety of magnets used.

There's a long running thread on setting up a LP regarding using the pots that's simply marvellous. Most of what it says is so blatantly obvious. And it's quite embarrassing that we've all been guilty of overlooking such simple methods before now. Maybe we've been distracted by decades of pedals and mods and special switches we've forgotten those four simple knobs right at hand. Back in the day it's all they had.

Daz
 

LtKojak

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2009
Messages
4,158
Reaction score
3,010
Overpriced.
How does that work when some cost less than Gibson pickups?
Gibson mass produces at boutique prices.
My anti-boutique sentiment would stem from all the great players I've heard over the decades getting heavenly tones on stock pickups.
Boutique is based off what stock was a few decades ago
Mr. wildhawk1, looks like your reading/comprehension skills are not up to par, as by what the extract of your conversation clearly shows, what you're saying makes absolutely no sense at all. Nice try, though... ;)
 

wildhawk1

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2017
Messages
2,001
Reaction score
4,011
Thanks for the observation.

I'll strive to do better in the future.

:rolleyes:
 

captcoolaid

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2008
Messages
11,450
Reaction score
3,933
Here to the op.

Many of us winders do a mad amount of custom work. I know that I have sets of asylums out there that are wound different for individual players. If you want imho the closest to a t top or paf pickup as far TPL, tone, even bobbins Eco and Bill magalia. Sorry cheo but I have not played yours yet.

I guess what I am trying to say is when you order boutique talk to the winder, discuss tones with examples pick attack as well as the guitar and components. These things will greatly improve upon your boutique experience, as well as narrowing down your tonal needs.
 

AJK1

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2014
Messages
1,184
Reaction score
623
Out of all the Production and "Boutique" pickups i've bought and wasted money on, the best pickups i've bought by far are the SD CS Pearly Gates set
Truly amazing and worth double the price
My Leddin sets are not far behind, but the Pearly's are truly divine
Nothing comes close
 

Blue Blood

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2010
Messages
1,186
Reaction score
1,144
Going back to pg 1, I have the WCR Godwood set (older ones) in my R8, theyre mental theyre so good. String definition, killer powerful bridge, & the middle position is JP live tone (& I suck lol). Neck does mellow zz top stuff easy.
I also have in my sons sg a 78 T Top. Different guitars yes so not an optimum control study, but the SG is a mahogany/maple neck variant from 1984.
The T top is a rad old school pickup, I love it, but its not quite as dynamic as WCR or Bare knuckles are.
YMMV
 

Redfish

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2007
Messages
599
Reaction score
381
I had a Faded Epi Dot Studio a few years back and no pickups aside from the original Epi "caked-in-wax-whatever-they-were" sounded good in that guitar. I pushed a lot of different things through it but those stock pickups fit it best.
I have an Epi Limited edition flame top dot 335 that has Asian 57 classics in it that sound amazing. In fact I bought that guitar used/mint with an SKB case for $400 and it smokes the three Gibson 335's I've owned and has a nice chunky (though unbound) neck too. I replaced the wiring harness but left those pickups in it. My buddy has a 2001 R9 that has 57 Classics in it I believe and it sounds incredible as is. If stock sounds great then I'm all for leaving well enough alone. Boutique can really save a so-so sounding guitar sometimes though. The good thing about it is you can usually sell them here with very little loss if they don't work out. I enjoy swapping them in LP's. 335's are a royal PIA. These days I will always at least try a Godwood bridge in any LP I buy. I freaking love that pickup.
 

Niilopi

Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2017
Messages
41
Reaction score
29
Great conversation goin on here. So i ordered a set of BBs back and sold the kloppmanns. The BBs work best so far in my configuration but im sure theres some more complex nice sounding pickups for my guitar too that i havent found yet so ill propably keep looking. My friend has some throbaks and Klein pickups for sale.

Also my rig is going trough changes as today i changed my jtm 45 negative feedback wiring from 16ohm to 4ohm output and that made the amp much tighter and clear. The normal channel is still pretty muddy and unclear on the neck pickup. That could be my guitar so..

as for the guitar i ordered an ABM 2500n-re bell brass bridge with steel studs. After this mod is made ill see how it affects the low strings of my guitar and it might be a whole new starting point for pickup searching.

The hard thing is that every change affects everything
 

Antigua

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 15, 2016
Messages
628
Reaction score
225
I think what the boutique market has shown companies like Seymour Duncan that you can't just have a '59 set, and have that represent the entirety of the PAF product in the 50's and 60's. Smaller companies offered PAF repros with slightly different specs that suited the tastes of some guitarists better, as such things are inherently a matter of personal taste. Seymour Duncan responded by offerring more PAF varieties, such as the Seth Lover, the Antiquity, Whole Lotta Humbucker, and now the Saturday Night Specials. But now they're creating a new sort of problem, a lot of guitarists like Lynyrd Skynyrd, but the way they've marketed their extended range of PAF's makes it seem as though the pickup is exclusive to the Lynyrd Skynyrd sound, when in fact it's really just a spec point which can work for a lot of things. How do they release the same spec point later, in a way that makes it both seem like a different product, but not intended as a "Lynyrd Skynyrd" pickup? Suppose you promoted a 22nF cap as your "Woman tone" cap, then later you try to sell a 22nF can just as a 22nF cap. How is it different than your "Woman tone" cap?
 

Niilopi

Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2017
Messages
41
Reaction score
29
Did someone say Lynyrd Skynyrd? You woke me up there.. i checked those pickups out and it seems like something ive been looking for. I might just have to get a pair of saturday night specials :D I didnt find any reference to them being sold as Lynyrd skynyrd pickups but only the name. They sell them as southern rock / 70s arena rock pickups. Kinda 50s PAF / Modern sound half way pickup.

Atleast on the videos they sound great
 

alnico59

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2014
Messages
1,153
Reaction score
897
Everybody wants a PAF until they get one!

Like mentioned earlier in the thread. The trick to getting a sweeter drive tone with the PAF bridge pickup is setting up your amp to the neck pickup and then dialing in the bridge using the guitar's controls.

In most cases with a re-pro PAF the bridge pu with everything on the guitar at 10 has an unusual reaction to drive, some what of a sterile quality in the high end. This from the pu being very bright and the 50's wiring making it even brighter. Solution is to back the tone on the bridge pu down to at least 8, and on some guitars as low as 4. This cures that unfavorable bridge drive tone many complain about with PAF's type pu's. Gives it more of an organic drive tone.

But I don't what it is? It just seems many, many, maaaaaaany people are programed to play with the controls on their guitar full up a 100% of the time???? Why not back down the controls on the guitar and compensate by turning up the controls (and gain) on the amp?
 


Latest Threads



Top