Bought My First Turntable in 40 Years

Olds442

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very nice! congrats and enjoy, vinyl is still the best!
 

Bluesky

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Allright........it arrived and was the perfect medicine for a rainy day off! Plugged right in, then I noticed the belt was shipped off the turntable... ..dont laugh.......i watched a you tube video to make sure I put it on right.Then I had to adjust that weighty thing on the arm. That's it.

The live Govt Mule was cool......but I don't think it was recorded that great to begin with. The Charile Musselwhite sounded fantastic!!!! A few pops here and there.....but I could actually hear the reeds in his harmonica! He hit a few notes that drove my dogs nuts . That's a great thing to own becuase that release is unavailable on CD. Really enjoyed that. Going to look forward to getting a few more LPs for sure!
 

Stillhouse

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Belt off is a sign of a good shipper. :dude: Look around AudioKarma for some turntable shipping horror stories. Loose platters knocked around busting tonearms and dustcovers. Not pretty.
 

Bluesky

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I gave him positive feedback. It shipped from a pawn shop in Oregon. Made no mention that it was a Pawner in the auction, I might not have bought it if I knew, I like things that came from a person with a personal connection. But it was well packed with no surprises.

So far so good. :h5:
 

Bluesky

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We will probably upgrade the cartridge/stylus eventually and will ask y'all for direction on that.
 

mjpinla

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The lifetime of a record is likely many times the MTBF of any digital storage device available.
My digital music files are backed up to hard drives here on my desk, and to a cloud backup service. They live in four separate places, so a failure on my player - or in one backup location - is irrelevant. If you damage an LP, or suffer some catastrophe where all of your LPs are stored, you're left with nothing.

But yeah, the odds of some LP being found and still being playable in 200 years is about a million times greater than the odds of someone being able to play one of my FLACs in 200 years (assuming there's anyone left to listen, of course). Digital files require maintenance and conversion to new formats to remain viable, not unlike the care and feeding of your LPs.
 

Sp8ctre

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From what I hear, vinyl is doing GREAT.

Hell, I don't know what I'd do without a turntable. Never been without one.

I have come to the conclusion the record companies have found a way to make money on music again. They have re-introduced vinyl to the younger generation and made in cool/hip/retro to own a turntable again...this to me is very good thing! Music that came out in the CD only age is now becoming available on my favorite format!
 

Gibsonian

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I bought up some used vinyl in the 90s when it was dirt cheap, mostly stuff that I couldn't afford in the 80s. Getting a reliable turntable setup was a different story. My first attempt a few years ago ended with an unreliable Ebay amp. Next I got a brand new Sherwood amp that lasted only a few days. Then I tried a cheap gift rewards freebee with a turntable. That broke. Right now my setup consists of a Sony PSLX300 turntable through a Sony STR-OH130 receiver and Infinity bookshelf speakers. I'm waiting on some Sony 3-way bookshelf speakers to arrive. I wasn't sure about going with Sony but so far, it's been great.
 

Gibsonian

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So far, I've only obtained two new vinyl releases: The Ozzy Live album with Randy Rhoads on 180g, which was originally released as a bonus cd, and KISS The Elder on 180g, because I wanted the lyric sleeve.
 

Stillhouse

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My digital music files are backed up to hard drives here on my desk, and to a cloud backup service. They live in four separate places, so a failure on my player - or in one backup location - is irrelevant. If you damage an LP, or suffer some catastrophe where all of your LPs are stored, you're left with nothing.

But yeah, the odds of some LP being found and still being playable in 200 years is about a million times greater than the odds of someone being able to play one of my FLACs in 200 years (assuming there's anyone left to listen, of course). Digital files require maintenance and conversion to new formats to remain viable, not unlike the care and feeding of your LPs.

I assume you meant "a million times lower," unless you intended to bolster my position.

This is the second time phonographs have made a comeback since the introduction of digital was supposed to kill it off. First in the 90s and then this time around it is actually bigger. Millions and millions(dare I say billions?) of records have been pressed over the decades since it's introduction and, with the exception of some titles that are obscure and many of which never have made it to a digital format in a commercial release, tons of copies are and will be available. Many collectors are conservators who preserve works that, as mentioned before, cannot be found elsewhere. To that end, I have a large archive of FLAC and WAV files of ripped records.

In 200 years there will likely be newer digital formats that outclass what is available today, and FLAC will be seen as old and obsolete the same way physical media is to younger listeners of today. Many institutions are preserving physical media such as films, photographs and phonographs and magnetic master tapes for posterity.
 

mjpinla

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I assume you meant "a million times lower," unless you intended to bolster my position.
I meant what I said. It's far more likely a record will be playable than a current digital file. Which is why digital data needs to be maintained and updated.

tons of copies are and will be available.
That only applies to popular music. For me to re-buy the fringe-y music I'm into would be extremely expensive (and virtually impossible in many cases). But then I'll never have to re-buy, because all of my music is stored in multiple locations.

There will be better digital mediums, that's unquestionable, but none of them will make the music reproduction any better. We're already way beyond the scope of human hearing as far as the available technology, so future improvements will likely be storage related.
 

Stillhouse

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I have to disagree with you on technology being on par with human hearing. Technically, maybe, but practically it leaves some to be desired. Soundstage, for one thing, always sounds more narrow and less defined on digital music compared to analog to my ears. Things like reverb sound like they are being produced by the room rather than simply being reproduced by a pair of speakers.
 

mjpinla

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to my ears.
Well, that's the problem any time we talk about how something sounds, isn't it. Our ears are connected to our brains and all of the preconceptions, biases and assumptions that live in them. We all have them and we all bring them to our interpretations or experiences of things. A lot of the time we hear what we want to hear, double blind audio tests have proven that time and time again.

In the pre-CD era I was always chasing the sound I heard in recording studios. Everything fell short (because of my biases and expectations ;) ), and maybe vinyl LPs worst of all. The very early CDs weren't always mastered properly, especially the catalog stuff. But once they got that worked out, which didn't take long, a well-mastered CD was the closest thing I'd ever heard - and still is - to what I'd heard in the studio (listen to Barry Diament's masters of all of the Bob Marley CDs on Tuff Gong to hear a master at work).

Of course it didn't take long for them to start compressing all the dynamics out of a lot of recorded music either, which is a whole other bag of fish.

Very few of us went through our formative years hearing perfect audio when we listened to music, and compared to those days, pretty much any decent stereo (or delivery medium) is a revelation. The best thing about the resurgence in vinyl - or the resurgence in CDs that we'll no doubt see in 10 or 15 years - is that it gets young people to listen to older music and broaden their musical experience. Whether they're listening on a $20,000 stereo, cheap "earbuds" jammed into their heads, or one of those $100 all-in-one Close'N Plays, doesn't really matter. The music is the important thing.
 

Fret Hopper

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I am a big fan of old hi fi equipment. I still have my Luxman PD 264 turntable that I bought back in 1979. Had it in storage for nearly 20 years and pulled it out about 10 years ago to listen to my old albums. After a little clean up it worked perfectly.

Still have my old Yamaha receiver I purchased in early '80s, Technics receiver and cassette deck purchased in late '80s, Onkyo stereo amp from the early '90s, plus a Yamaha receiver purchased in '99. Just can't let go of that stuff when it still works perfectly and can be adapted to modern tech.

Mark
 

davebz

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We will probably upgrade the cartridge/stylus eventually and will ask y'all for direction on that.
It can be a pita to change a cartridge,it has to be aligned with a protractor. and the overhang needs to be right.And anti-skating on most TT doesn't work right.Just set it the best you can and enjoy.
 

pnuggett

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I am a big fan of old hi fi equipment. I still have my Luxman PD 264 turntable that I bought back in 1979. Had it in storage for nearly 20 years and pulled it out about 10 years ago to listen to my old albums. After a little clean up it worked perfectly.

Still have my old Yamaha receiver I purchased in early '80s, Technics receiver and cassette deck purchased in late '80s, Onkyo stereo amp from the early '90s, plus a Yamaha receiver purchased in '99. Just can't let go of that stuff when it still works perfectly and can be adapted to modern tech.

Mark

I have and still use that exact same Luxman turntable. Works flawlessly.
 

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