Bondo is for cars not guitars!

ARandall

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Man that's a great job there. I bet that took some time to get right too....but on some great old wood like that its worth it.
I especially liked the fishing-line technique. A great solution!!
 

lowatter

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Great save on that poor neglected/abused guitar. The guy that made the previous repair must work at Earl SchIves.
I've been looking for an ES125TDC that I can afford for years. In the condition you received that one in is about the only way I'll ever be able to get one in my hands. I've pondered building a replica but I'm pretty tired of taking on projects.
Again, wonderful save you did there.
 

Baylin

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wonderful, I'm glad there's folk like you out there with the skill to save these beauties!
 

Jumping@shadows

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Lovely stuff! I particularly liked threading the support blocks- simple and effective :)
 

fatdaddypreacher

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spectacular save. excellant plan and execution. but what's wrong with bondo if it's instument grade. every now and then someone would like a 15 lb guitar neck.:)

seriously, dude. great work.
 

moreles

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Thanks for posting this. Masterful solutions and execution. Personally, I think there's a moral dimension to keeping instruments in use, and honoring the effort and value involved in making them to begin with. The very fact that you cared enough about this instrument to see its resurrection through to completion is inspiring. Congratulations, and thanks for keeping one more good guitar in circulation.
 

Adinol

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Here is the story of a 59 Gibson ES125TDC that really needed some love and a lot of bondo removal......
Brian Howard's guitar building & repair blog: The Bondo Cutaway Or Why I hate bondo on guitars!
First of all, great work!

I am new to this and would like to know how exactly did you plug the holes on the headstock. What exact cutting tool did you use to even the holes and how exactly did you fabricate the mahogany plugs?

It's not that I wouldn't be able to figure out a way to do it, I am just asking if there is a time proven and practical method that luthiers use to do this exact work.

Thanks...
 

B. Howard

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First of all, great work!

I am new to this and would like to know how exactly did you plug the holes on the headstock. What exact cutting tool did you use to even the holes and how exactly did you fabricate the mahogany plugs?

It's not that I wouldn't be able to figure out a way to do it, I am just asking if there is a time proven and practical method that luthiers use to do this exact work.

Thanks...
I bored the holes out to 1/2" on my drill press with a regular twist drill. The plugs were cut with a plug cutter like this.
Fuller Plug Cutter 1/2"
 

reedy

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Awesome work! It's nice to see someone saving these old guitars rather than stripping them for parts.
 

Spotcheck Billy

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I am in agreement that it is better to restore these guitars than part them out. We have (sadly) developed into a disposable culture so I applaud you for bucking the trend. I understand the economic arguments against it but, just like land, they aren't making any more of these. Reissues are not 1959s.
 

geoffstgermaine

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That original "repair" was a mess!

Looks like a well thought out and executed repair that will last that instrument a lifetime. There's a nice story behind that instrument as well.
 




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