Binding fretboard before gluing

ejendres

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How do you guys go about this?

Has anyone run a flush trim bit along the binding? I'm guessing that would probably just melt the binding.

If you don't flush trim whats your guy's process for aligning the shaft and the board? Do you carve the neck before gluing?

Any tips would be appreciated.
 

Skyjerk

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I cut the fretboard using the same template as the neck, so they are identical in size.

I route exactly one binding width off each long edge of the board, and then glue the binding on. At that point it is again the exact same width as the neck shaft. Nothing left to do after that to flush the edge of the board with the edge of the neck other than possibly some very light sanding.

I align the board for gluing using a couple pins on top of the neck shaft. I align the fretboard by hand and press it down onto the pins so they make corresponding holes on the underside of the fretboard.

After glue up this keeps the fretboard from sliding out of position when I apply clamping pressure.

I carve the neck after the fretboard is glued on
 
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ejendres

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I cut the fretboard using the same template as the neck, so they are identical in size.

I route exactly one binding width off each long edge of the board, and then glue the binding on. At that point it is again the exact same width as the neck shaft.

I carve the neck after the fretboard is glued on
Thanks man! This is the process I'm planning to do currently, but I just wanted to see what else people are doing.
 

Skyjerk

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Thanks man! This is the process I'm planning to do currently, but I just wanted to see what else people are doing.
This is key. I use pieces of the actual binding to offset the fretboard in from the edge of the template and stick it in place. This assures that I'm routing off the exact width of the binding.

When I do the other edge I have to use 2 widths of binding to get my offset since at this point the fretboard is already one binding width narrower than the finished board.

Does that make sense?
 

ejendres

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I'm not 100% following you.

It makes sense to use the actual binding to make the offset I'm just not understand how you're setting it all up
 

Skyjerk

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A picture is worth a thousand words :)

I had some pix from a build a couple years ago to show what I mean.

in the first photo, the fretboard is sitting up against a block of mahogany. It sitting on top of the template which is also up tight against that block of mahogany.

I place short strips of binding between the edge of the board and the block of wood next to it. You can see one at each end of the freboard.

These strips offset the fretboard so that the opposite edge of the fretboard is overhanging the edge of the template by exactly one binding width. I then route that overhang off the fretboard. the board is now narrower by one binding width.






Next, with the board turned around so that the opposite edge is now facing out, you'll see two strips of binding at each end of the board.

Two are needed this time because the board has already had one binding width routed off, so a single strip of binding would only offset the board to be flush with the edge of the template. :)
Another strip is needed to offset it so that it overhangs by one binding width.



I'm sure there are other ways to do this, but this is my method
 
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ARandall

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I have a template for the 'fretboard without binding'.......made from the neck shaft template but routed with the same bit as you'd use for the binding channel to make it that 1mm or so narrower each side.

That way I do 1 cut.....which is the fretboard blank to size ready for binding. I then bind before gluing - that way I can prep the base and make sure its all flat and ready to glue to the neck shaft.
If your binding is too wide, then cut down after gluing to the neck......seems to make for a much smoother finished product with my builds
 

pshupe

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I use a stainless steel template which includes binding but you could easily use an offset bearing bit to take off 1mm or so off each side using the same template. That way it works for a bound and an unbound board. Here is a pic of the one I use -
Capture.JPG


Cheers Peter.
 

Norton

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Did you buy those templates somewhere?? Or did you fab them yourself?

Pretty smart!
 

pshupe

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I made them up myself but Tom Bartlett is selling all of those except the head stock template. I have made quite a few one off templates that are similar to the top two with indexing slots for slotting a finger board as well. They are quite handy.

Cheers Peter.
 

valvetoneman

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i use an unbound width template for fretboards and a bound width for necks, i taper the board first then i glue it on after i radius it and slot it etc and i build the fretboard up on a neck so binding goes on last, of course this does depend on if it's with or without nibs as i like to tweak the truss rod first then flat the board again then fret last

Hope that makes sense to someone, i barely know what day of the week it is
 




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