BFCG is my guardian angel...

GreaseBox

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So I was using the router today and I was noticing something funny. Seemed almost like the bit was slipping out. I was sure I tightened the thing pretty good! I remembered the story that BFCG told about the bit that came out and shot through the wall. I immediately stopped the router and checked the bit. Sure enough, it was slipping out! I had my face right down by it. :shock:

So I thank you BFCG!!! Once again your router bit story saved me from injury!!! :thumb:

You Rock!
:dude:
 

bfcg

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No cheating allowed!!!!
Minimum 3/4 of the way in the chuck. Full insertion if application allows.
Big humungus bits should not be run at 22000 rpm.
I am glad you did not get killed or injured.

Check your spindle after something like that happens, mine bent when it happened to me and I had to order a whole new spindle and motor assembly that cost almost as much as the router.
 

GreaseBox

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No cheating allowed!!!!
Minimum 3/4 of the way in the chuck. Full insertion if application allows.
Big humungus bits should not be run at 22000 rpm.
I am glad you did not get killed or injured.

Check your spindle after something like that happens, mine bent when it happened to me and I had to order a whole new spindle and motor assembly that cost almost as much as the router.

Yeah, I wasn't cheating. :D Full insertion. I must have not had it tight enough. It moved about 1/16" and your story instantly came to mind. Power off, tighten chuck! Whew...
 

Kølabrennern

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Back when I read that story the first time I decided that I'll just be buying guitars and not even try building them myself. I'm cursed with extreme bad luck, so I'm positive that the day after I'd start routing someone would find me in the workshop with a router bit stuck in my brains.

Okey, that's a little over the top, but I figure it's better if I stay as far away as I can from powertools. :)
 

Ole'Lefty

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Put a couple of neoprene "O" rings down in the collet. Bottoming them out is just about as dangerous.O'L
 

Ole'Lefty

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I don't know all of the reasons for it, but if we headstrong folks read our tool instructions(note I said "we") we would learn plenty. I think that almost every router safety discussion I have come across says not to bottom the bit-insert fully, raise about 1/16"- 1/8th" and tighten. I think it has to do with the fact that as a collet tightens, it does change height as the jaws squeeze-we rarely think about that. So, you end up with a "false tight."O'L
 

bfcg

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I don't know all of the reasons for it, but if we headstrong folks read our tool instructions(note I said "we") we would learn plenty. I think that almost every router safety discussion I have come across says not to bottom the bit-insert fully, raise about 1/16"- 1/8th" and tighten. I think it has to do with the fact that as a collet tightens, it does change height as the jaws squeeze-we rarely think about that. So, you end up with a "false tight."O'L

You are correct. I am not completely sure why there needs to be that gap but I do remember reading that.
Fortunatly, bottoming out the bits is not an option most of the time unless you have unusually long shanks or you are using a bit without a bearing or guide bushing.

If you are using the Dewalt 621 or Dewalt 625, the chuck does tighten a little once and then again if you torque it a little more. Hard to explain but if you own one of these you will know what I mean.
This could be a cure: http://cgi.ebay.com/Eliminator-Chuc...in_0?hash=item3ca4642bad&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14
http://cgi.ebay.com/Amazing-Elimina...in_0?hash=item3ca4642d85&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14
 

MRJ5

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I am not sure, personally if I would trust a hex set screw. Ends blunt out, set screw tops crack, set screws loosten from vibration and allen wrenches round off. Too many variables for failure in my eyes. Just an opinion.

Speaking of collets another safety point that should be made is to keep the collet clean and clear of debris and inspected often. Collets can oval or grip unevenly if dust or particles are allowed to build up in the collet. This is more likely in a router mounted collet up, in a table where the collet becomes an open recepticle every time a bit is changed.

Collets weaken with age as well so good practice is to inspect often and replace before it creates a problem rather than wait for a failure first.
 

bfcg

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Speaking of collets another safety point that should be made is to keep the collet clean and clear of debris and inspected often. Collets can oval or grip unevenly if dust or particles are allowed to build up in the collet. This is more likely in a router mounted collet up, in a table where the collet becomes an open recepticle every time a bit is changed.

Collets weaken with age as well so good practice is to inspect often and replace before it creates a problem rather than wait for a failure first.

So true. Anybody using bits, blades or any sharp tool that comes in contact with wood should also have a bottle or can of pitch remover.
I have tried several and the best one I have found is the stuff from Grizzly called "Sprayway"- Saw Cleaner Pitch and gum remover.
I soak my blades ,bits AND collets in this stuff and it cleans them like new with very little if any rubbing.
Having absoulutly clean edges is essential for smooth clean cuts with no burning and a lot less stress on your equipment.
If you sharpen your own router bits like I do, you must have a clean edge before you have at it with the diamond stones.
Also works with bandsaw blades if you have the patience.
 

Ole'Lefty

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It can be a struggle to get the eliminator balanced. To me, that is its real downside. I have no problem with the hex head clamping. I have tried these on two routers and could never get rid of the additional vibration. I use the extender and "raizer" from the same fellow and they work very well. Made in Des Moines, Iowa. O'L
 

landsharkey

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I think it has to do with the fact that as a collet tightens, it does change height as the jaws squeeze-we rarely think about that. So, you end up with a "false tight.
You also want to make sure the collet is only on the straight part of the router shaft and not touching the fillet (if the bit has one)
 

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LG2

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I don't know all of the reasons for it, but if we headstrong folks read our tool instructions(note I said "we") we would learn plenty. I think that almost every router safety discussion I have come across says not to bottom the bit-insert fully, raise about 1/16"- 1/8th" and tighten. I think it has to do with the fact that as a collet tightens, it does change height as the jaws squeeze-we rarely think about that. So, you end up with a "false tight."O'L

I agree, also chatter from the two parts vibrating can be bad.

insert the bit fully then pull it out a 1/16 or so then tighten does the job.

If you are using the Dewalt 621 or Dewalt 625, the chuck does tighten a little once and then again if you torque it a little more. Hard to explain but if you own one of these you will know what I mean.
This could be a cure: http://cgi.ebay.com/Eliminator-Chuck...d=p3286.c0.m14
http://cgi.ebay.com/Amazing-Eliminat...d=p3286.c0.m14

my 3 hp Makita is the same.
 

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