Best strap locks without drilling?

siore

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I think the trick with attaching a strap to a guitar is to take the button off the guitar and attach the strap via the underside of it. Providing you use a decent, thick strap (personally, I don't use anything that isn't leather), the material around the button hole should be sturdy enough to hold the strap firmly in place for years. Does with mine.

For a cheap alternative to retail strap locks, I find a metallic washer that's just wide enough to fit around the inner part of the button and too small to fit over the outer part also does the job nicely. It does basically the same thing as a Schaller, but costs about 10p.

OP might want to consider this. Got a thick tooled leather on one of my guitars, it's plenty stiff that if installed the way described above, it won't require any straplocks. The other guitar I have has a planet waves nylon strap. Metal washer does the trick.

But as kernelofwisdom said, it won't be an option if you take off your strap regularly. :laugh2:
 

Mr. Snappy

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I've used Schaller on everything for over 20 years and never had to drill. When I recently sold four of my Les Pauls I simply took the Schallers off and put the stock Gibson screws/buttons back on. No drilling and no filling. :)
 

kernelofwisdom

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+1 I've had a Gibson Custom Shop come with Schallers :shock:

And at the Custom Shop, absolute truth, there on a Luthier's bench, was a small cup of toothpicks with all the other tools. I guess they do a lot of toothpicking at Gibson while they make the guitars. :dude:

Filing a screw down that is the same size as the Gibson puts in it is a great way to install Schallers, but it doesn't at all say the toothpick method is wrong or in any way dangerous.

Think about it. Gravity attracts toward the earth. the smaller screw near the neck then is the one that actually can be pulled away from the guitar if the guitar is tilted in playing position. The one in the back is not pulled away from the guitar and in any event the screw is in good and tight with the good old toothpick method.

Of course, it is advised to use mahogany toothpicks for tone purposes.
 

bluemoon

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Schallers. No mods, no fuss. The stock screws have worked fine in all of my guitars.

I am with you. I never had to do any drilling. The screws that came with Schallers worked fine on my Standard.
 

Silly_Sam

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Are dunlop screws thicker than the stock gibson screws? By the way, allparts sells schaller kind of straplocks, and I think their screws are bigger than the actual schaller.
 

JMV

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Uhm, Schallers.

If you drill anything to install Schallers, you're doing it wrong. :laugh2:
 

Dan

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I have Schallers on all my guitars. They are the best.
 

DreamKing

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Been using Dunlops for over a year. No issues, they seem to be good quality, and no drilling required.
 

Jimbo

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I dunno why people say you need a toothpick with the schallers? I didnt I just simply put the screws it came with in both my Gibsons and they went in tight and sweet.. not a problem.
 

moff40

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I dunno why people say you need a toothpick with the schallers? I didnt I just simply put the screws it came with in both my Gibsons and they went in tight and sweet.. not a problem.

Every Schaller I've installed in 30 years has been tight without modification, at least at first. Sometimes they loosen up with use. The toothpick is just insurance. Instead of the toothpick, some guys just put in a couple of drops of white carpenter's glue when they put the Schaller screws in to fill any gaps that might be present. I've used toothpicks (or drumstick shards, or whatever), and I've used white glue. I've even done both.

OP - it's pretty simple, really. The only things that install "over" the stock strap buttons are those plastic Dunlop things, which are crap. I bought a pair once - once. They're flimsy and break easily. I wouldn't trust them to support my kids' Guitar Hero controller, let alone my real guitars. The Dunlop centre-pushbutton-release straplocks are OK, but tend to wear out quickly and get sticky over time. Another danger is that if the little balls aren't securely in the slot, down goes the guitar. The best of the "real" straplocks are Schallers. Solid, dependable, and even if the centre plunger doesn't go all the way in, there's still the "tongue and groove" design as backup.
 

Rock

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I just tried some of those plastic Dunlop round Ergo locks. I don't know what say about them yet? On one hand they do go on and you don't have to do anything to your old screws. That's cool, but on the other hand they are plastic.

If you just stand there and play they should be o.k., I guess, but if you move around a lot I'm not sure. They are cheap so it won't cost a lot just to try a couple of them for yourself.

Mine is holding for now but when I take the guitar off and the strap starts to turn so does the Dunlop's round lock. It has two round pieces of plastic. One doesn't move and the other does move. You turn the second plastic and it locks the Dunlop in place. In theory. Like I said, if I take my strap off and the strap gets twisted it unlocks the stap lock.

I don't know if I really trust it. I'm always looking at it to see if it came undone. On the other hand I wasn't using any strap locks before I got these so it's better than nothing.

What I would do (and might) if I want to keep these and make it stronger (I guess) is to cover the whole Dunlop Ergo mofo in duct tape. This way it might be stronger and won't move that second piece of plastic. Once that plastic moves then it comes off. So you need something to prevent it from moving and give that plastic more strength. The only thing I can think of is to duct tape the whole thing once it's on.
 

Boleskinehouse

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The bottom button holes are not always the same size. My Norlins and a few of my USAs didn't require toothpicks. All of my Custom Shop guitars and the other few USAs, did.
 

Pelt

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Welcome to Lock It Straps

Give this a look. I've bought one for my son and it seems to be pretty good. No modifying guitar at all. I'm thinking about one for myself.
 

axepilot

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The wood working purists with all of the right tools seem to suggest removing the stock screw, drilling the hole, fitting a proper dowel, redrilling for the new screw, and mounting the peg. All fine and dandy if you're equipped like Norm Abrams and really want to jump through those hoops......

The practical player in me uses the "wood glue dipped toothpicks to fill the hole, clip them flush, screw the new peg peg in, allow to dry overnight - rock out" method....................no Yankee Workshop tools or jigs needed....

With the toothpicks / wood glue method:

-The glue bond with the toothpicks will be stronger than the actual wood of the guitar

-Is bulletproof if done right......and it's hard to screw up

It's a tried and trued fix.
 

Mike-t

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The wood working purists with all of the right tools seem to suggest removing the stock screw, drilling the hole, fitting a proper dowel, redrilling for the new screw, and mounting the peg. All fine and dandy if you're equipped like Norm Abrams and really want to jump through those hoops......

The practical player in me uses the "wood glue dipped toothpicks to fill the hole, clip them flush, screw the new peg peg in, allow to dry overnight - rock out" method....................no Yankee Workshop tools or jigs needed....

With the toothpicks / wood glue method:

-The glue bond with the toothpicks will be stronger than the actual wood of the guitar

-Is bulletproof if done right......and it's hard to screw up

It's a tried and trued fix.

Ding Ding Ding! End of thread
 

Ldog

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Just in case anyone comes across this thread as I did...

I have a brand new LP Trad Pro. I ordered the Schaller locks. I searched and came across this thread as the factory screws versus the Schaller screws *LOOKED* so different I thought for sure I'd have to do something to make them work.

After reviewing this thread - I just *tried* it. They work great.

As someone suggests above, while they may visually look like they won't work, the Screw heads on the the screws that come with the Schaller's sit far closer to the guitar than do the factory screws.

Net net - before grinding down heads, gluing things or sticking toothpicks in your guitar, at least give the Schaller screws a try. You might be surprised.
 

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