Beano pot being stirred again by Guitarist magazine

Snakum

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Accompanied by some bores proclaiming "BONAMASSA SHOULD OWN IT!!!11111" as well.

Just because a guy plays tedious-as-fuck white man blues, doesn't entitle him to every iconic late-fifties plank of wood ever.
Though my wife thinks he is God's gift, I can't say I'm a huge JB fan. But I do like a lot of what he does and he comes off as a down-to-earth and decent guy. IMHO he's earned everything he has and deserves the credit for doing it all without a record company or big promo company behind him. Your post is just a wee bit harsh and misguided, IMO.

Besides, he kinda does share the wealth by taking these old things out on tour. Who else does that? Not Ric Nielson. Not that guy from REO Speedwagon.
 

JMT Guitars

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How many of us who own vintage guitars really know if they had been stolen at some point in the past? I doubt that back in the 60's you could even insure a professionally used musical instrument. All I know is possession is nine tenths of the law in a dispute.
Haha no it really isn't, thats just something people who are afraid that they are on the wrong side of the law say
 

rfrizz

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How many of us who own vintage guitars really know if they had been stolen at some point in the past? I doubt that back in the 60's you could even insure a professionally used musical instrument. All I know is possession is nine tenths of the law in a dispute.
That line from Lord Mansfield is often repeated, but rarely understood. We can't ignore the claims of a prior possessor, particularly if he can prove it with say, a sales receipt with serial number. Or maybe an old stage or studio photograph with the serial number visible.

On a similar note, if Clapton's drug dealer swiped Beano and then sold it to a guitar shop, anyone off the street who purchased it from the shop would then have ownership. Even if Slowhand found a photo, an old insurance rider, and the original recipt, he would be SOLH -- Sh*t Outta Luck, Handy.

Meh. That really sucked.

Anyway... This is just the general outcome in a property dispute under common law, and it won't necessarily apply everywhere. The rule is intended to protect the rights of everyday Joes who make good-faith purchases from merchants.
 

Macaz

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Some musicians just don’t have the attachment to instruments that others might.
Eric, George, Keith R were always passing guitars around. They all were generous in gifting guitars to their friends.
Pete Townsend would smash a guitar up as part of his act and I doubt if he’s ever had a favourite. From the early eighties, Eric hardly performed with the same guitar twice. Brandishing a new shiny, latest edition Strat.
I’m sure he’d be interested in playing the ‘Beano’ LP again but I imagine more out of curiosity and then he’d probably auction it for charity.
To resent Joe B owning some precious lumber is just pure jealousy. He is a musician who genuinely loves guitars, their history and the stories they come with. He has an almost encyclopaedic knowledge of USA guitars and has earned the right to own them.
who else would you rather be the custodian of these historical instruments.
Also, to the anti-JB posters, If you haven’t heard his new Abbey Road album then you should give it a listen.
Some great tracks on there.
Sadly, these ‘Celebrated’ guitars can lay in hiding for a lifetime and only apear when they come up for sale.
I was surprised when a Kossoff LP appeared from it’s ‘hiding place’ only round the corner from where I live. Unbeknown to me that I’d been living next to a Kossoff LP for 30 years
So. keep yer eyes and ears open. Beano could be next door!
 

sws1

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At the time the guitar was stolen it wasn't any kind of artifact, and not worth much more than any other used guitar. Except maybe an extra hundred because Clapton owned it. To Eric, it was probably just another tool for his trade. Which is probably why he never really made too big of a deal about it. All of this talk about insurance on it, it being highly valued, would not even be in the minds of those involved back in the day. I'm sure no one back then would even expect the late 50's Les Pauls to become worth what they are today, let alone even believe that Gibson would ever make them again.

Context is everything, and most people here are looking at this through today's eyes. Even if the guitar was found today by the police at some dude's home, they could only go after the dude for the value the guitar was the day it was stolen. And that's if he was indeed the thief. Anything would be hard to prove. Today's sentimental and collectible value for that guitar would have no effect on the case for the day it was taken because no can know the future.

With that being said, I would love for the guitar to resurface so the world can view and hear it once again. But it probably won't, not out of fear for being arrested, but out of fear of losing it. And to some extent, you can't blame the person who now has possession of it for keeping it in the glass case in their secret room. Especially if they are the third owner or later. Personally, I would contact Clapton and set up a meet and greet reunion and surprise him with it. In the end, he might just tell you to keep it! You never know...
If you were a band touring the world, I can't imagine, even in that time, that management would NOT have had insurance on all the gear.
 

Truth011

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That line from Lord Mansfield is often repeated, but rarely understood. We can't ignore the claims of a prior possessor, particularly if he can prove it with say, a sales receipt with serial number. Or maybe an old stage or studio photograph with the serial number visible.

Think of it this way: the holder of a guitar in question is given the benefit of doubt unless PROVEN otherwise. In EC's case it is well known that he didn't keep a sales receipt and didn't take close up photos to document the guitar in case of theft. He also has said he doesn't remember it's serial number.That fact alone should prove he DIDN'T have Beano insured as the Insurance company would have needed the serial number for the rider! There is a reason expensive reissues come with a COA today. Also Eric's memory may have been a little foggy back in the day.

As for insurance back in the day. My bet is that meant keeping a guitar you cared about close at hand and having a roadie you trusted keep an eye on it .
 

pmonk

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Some musicians just don’t have the attachment to instruments that others might.
Eric, George, Keith R were always passing guitars around. They all were generous in gifting guitars to their friends.
Pete Townsend would smash a guitar up as part of his act and I doubt if he’s ever had a favourite. From the early eighties, Eric hardly performed with the same guitar twice. Brandishing a new shiny, latest edition Strat.
I’m sure he’d be interested in playing the ‘Beano’ LP again but I imagine more out of curiosity and then he’d probably auction it for charity.
To resent Joe B owning some precious lumber is just pure jealousy. He is a musician who genuinely loves guitars, their history and the stories they come with. He has an almost encyclopaedic knowledge of USA guitars and has earned the right to own them.
who else would you rather be the custodian of these historical instruments.
Also, to the anti-JB posters, If you haven’t heard his new Abbey Road album then you should give it a listen.
Some great tracks on there.
Sadly, these ‘Celebrated’ guitars can lay in hiding for a lifetime and only apear when they come up for sale.
I was surprised when a Kossoff LP appeared from it’s ‘hiding place’ only round the corner from where I live. Unbeknown to me that I’d been living next to a Kossoff LP for 30 years
So. keep yer eyes and ears open. Beano could be next door!

A guitar is a tool of the trade. Outside of Page, all the great guitar players from the 1960's and 1970's all played numerous guitars.

In hindsight, if they knew back in the 1960's that these guitars would be worth hundred of thousand of dollars today, they would most likely have a different attitude.
 

guitartsar

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Struck me reading about Beano that's it funny how a lot of us seek very original vintage guitars and that breaks, repairs, refinishes and changed parts really affect the value. But all that goes out of the window when it comes to celebrity player owned guitars. It kinda won't matter what has happend to Beano over the years it will still be a seriously valuable guitar because of it's pedigree. Same with Pages No 1 despite the shaved nack and changed pick up etc and Greenie with it's headstock breaks and parts changes. Makes me wonder about starting my own Turd collection as at the end of the day it's the playing them that counts!
 

goldtop0

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Struck me reading about Beano that's it funny how a lot of us seek very original vintage guitars and that breaks, repairs, refinishes and changed parts really affect the value. But all that goes out of the window when it comes to celebrity player owned guitars. It kinda won't matter what has happend to Beano over the years it will still be a seriously valuable guitar because of it's pedigree. Same with Pages No 1 despite the shaved nack and changed pick up etc and Greenie with it's headstock breaks and parts changes. Makes me wonder about starting my own Turd collection as at the end of the day it's the playing them that counts!

Yes the famous guitar player factor is a major problem :laugh2:
the problem being.............. I'M NOT FAMOUS:oops:
 
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AJK1

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Watch at about 3:30 mins in and then 6:30 mins
 
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Truth011

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Context.

This is cool. How many 1959-1960s had white pu neck/black pu bridge?
View attachment 516557

So maybe the guy nicked it in 1966 and sold it to Janne Schaffer?
Anything is possible. There is a small window in 1960 for those features. The problem is that it has been reportedly found in a famous NY collection that sounds like Biff and a recent YouTube video from a guy in England saying it could be there. This all adds to it's mystery.
 

ThePanda

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Anything is possible. There is a small window in 1960 for those features. The problem is that it has been reportedly found in a famous NY collection that sounds like Biff and a recent YouTube video from a guy in England saying it could be there. This all adds to it's mystery.
Joe B where are you?

We need some answers :wave:
 

GBLEV

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If you were a band touring the world, I can't imagine, even in that time, that management would NOT have had insurance on all the gear.
You would be surprised at how frivolous labels spent money back then. Sure, they might have been required to carry some insurance against the gig as a whole, and I'm sure to a certain extent gear was covered. But for the gear alone? I highly doubt it.
 

AJK1

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Because Beano has a double white and double black with a plaintop, wouldn’t that make it a 58 or early 59 ?
 


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