Bands, how much are they really worth it?

MichaelAndrew3435

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I almost wrote something similar. After college, original bands are pretty much impossible. You're either going pro in music and going all-in, or you're going pro in something else, in which case you don't really have the time to do an original band justice (the vast majority of the times). The people that have the time are the drama cases, the deadbeat cases without the jobs, etc.

There are obviously exceptions. There's a reason that most people playing original music and gigging are the singer/songwriter types with an acoustic guitar and maybe one other person, though.
Yeah, original groups take a lot of work. What made this one work for 2 years was everyone at the beginning had something they had in their back pocket to start with. I'll admit, it was mostly material the band leader/drummer had, but I had a few things too and was able to add accordingly to whatever other people had. I'm not a terrific songwriter but I came up with some decent solo's for some of the tracks. Some I'm proud of, others meh.

Everyone was committed and motivated at the beginning too, and me being able to work from home was absolutely essential for me to make time for the project. I don't play on the clock, but I'm able to wake up early and play before logging onto my computer vs needing to drive somewhere. I'm not sure I would have been able to do it for so long if I had to spend 2 hours/day commuting 5 days/week.
 

MichaelAndrew3435

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Team: One guy carries the load, the others want their opinions heard. :p
I would almost consider myself a "co-leader" considering what I contributed. As far as carrying the load musically, it's safe to say this was the drummer. The dude who carried us professionally while providing a solid jam space was me. Different kind of load to carry, but an important one.

I guess they can go back to renting a space but I hated doing that personally. The place we used to rent at blew. All their basic equipment sucked as well as their rooms and overall service. Being on the clock at a rehearsal studio kinda sucks too. Less bonding and jamming time. You spend a good 20 minutes getting everything setup and ready to go. Even if we'd show up a little early, getting the drums and mics assembled, amps, and the volume mix took at least 20 minutes. If you're booking a 2 hour session, you're lucky if you get 90 minutes of solid playing in.
 

ErictheRed

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Lol dang, you mean I have to be under 23 years old to be rich and famous?

Just kidding of course. I'm not trying to get rich and famous lol. I'm about to hit my 30's in December. All I want to do is create music I'm proud of and maybe play a crappy bar gig every now and then, which is what I was able to do with this band so I feel kind of at peace in some ways as far as accomplishments go. I wish we could have gotten professional grade recordings however, but that's alright. Continuing to work with shitty people isn't worth what I'd have to do to achieve that.
I think (being 13 years older than you) that you're just hitting the point in life where you really start to differentiate between the responsible adults and the losers. Throughout your 20s it's a little harder to differentiate, because a lot of people are taking a longer path through school or grad school, don't have kids or real responsibilities yet, etc.

Once you're dealing with a group of adults (everyone over 27 years old or so), then you're pretty much responsible or a loser in my experience. If you've got musicians over 30 who don't have their own equipment, don't have their own transportation, don't have a job, etc, you've got to move on. That's forgivable for a while in your early 20s maybe, but at some point it just becomes a sign that you're lazy, irresponsible, have bad people skills, abuse drugs or alcohol, what have you. I'm not saying that everyone in the band needs to be super successful in their careers, but they should be a functioning adult or don't even bother with them.
 

mdubya

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Collaborating is very hard. There is no right or wrong way to make art or to express yourself. There is also no particularly easy way, either.

From experience, the fewer people you rely upon to do what you want to do, the easier it goes.

I am down to just me. I will occasionally join others because I know I don't need to rely or depend upon them.

I have a couple of nephews I can jam with a few times a year and we have so much fun. I have a couple of others that cannot or will not jam.

My looper pedal is a hard task master. But is also a great and reliable musical partner. Even if the reflection is not always pleasant to look at. o_O

Almost every successful band I have witnessed had a driving force. That driving force stayed as the constant. The rest came and went.
 

Bobby Mahogany

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You need to find musicians with their own equipment, their own transportation, and their own job. I don't care how good they are, if they don't have those things, they're too much trouble (drama, deadbeat, unreliable, entitled, druggie, whatever). Those simple criteria will eliminate 90% of your problems.
People with such characteristics aren't usually musicians!

:rofl:
 

Bobby Mahogany

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The world is ready for my cover band consisting of us guys in their late 40s early 50s. You just wait.
:rofl:

I have "musician friends" or should I say "acquaintances" in that age bracket and more
that when I meet by accident and ask about "what's up" answer:
"Oh you know, this and that, and I'm working on an album, it's coming together
slowly but, you know, it's really cool and I think it has potential" ...
Which is the same they said 20 years ago...
 

MichaelAndrew3435

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I think (being 13 years older than you) that you're just hitting the point in life where you really start to differentiate between the responsible adults and the losers. Throughout your 20s it's a little harder to differentiate, because a lot of people are taking a longer path through school or grad school, don't have kids or real responsibilities yet, etc.

Once you're dealing with a group of adults (everyone over 27 years old or so), then you're pretty much responsible or a loser in my experience. If you've got musicians over 30 who don't have their own equipment, don't have their own transportation, don't have a job, etc, you've got to move on. That's forgivable for a while in your early 20s maybe, but at some point it just becomes a sign that you're lazy, irresponsible, have bad people skills, abuse drugs or alcohol, what have you. I'm not saying that everyone in the band needs to be super successful in their careers, but they should be a functioning adult or don't even bother with them.
100%. What's sad is I'm the 2nd youngest of them all. Bass player and drummer are 35-36, singer is 27? (I think). You're correct, nobody needs to be super successful in their personal lives to be a reliable bandmate. They just need to have their shit together to some degree and that includes having your own gear. No excuses if you're 35 and don't have a way to play drums at a potential gig, or you aren't willing to do whatever is necessary to get a recording you're happy with without having to rely on someone else's drum set. Being this way in your mid 30's means they're set in their ways and beyond the point of ever changing.

I understand the struggle out there. Some people live in an apartment and can't bang on drums. But it's 2021 and we have so much technology and ways to work around problems like these. Dude could get his own, basic set for gigs and use his electric set to practice in an apartment. There are a million ways to record anything these days. If you don't like how the electric drum sounds in a recording, I'm sure there's a way you can edit/tweak the recordings or get a plugin of some sort you're happy with. Suggestions like these were never taken seriously. Some people ya just can't work with no matter what.
 

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