Ask Grumpy Old Luthier BCRGreg Thread

Dewey Finn

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I have a 97 SG x in wineburst that I want to strip down to bare wood. Will a heat gun remove the finish cleanly or will I need a chemical stripper? Thanks in advance.

Rich
 

DSR31

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Inlay Replacement

Hi Greg, I am working on an old beat up Gibson 330 semi-acoustic with the small 'plastic' rectangular inlays and, because the plastic inlays have shrunk and curved at the edges they need to be replaced. I found many suppliers of real mother of pearl rectangular inlays but they are the modern larger type (like on a LP custom) and none of the smaller earlier Gibson rectangular inlays so I decided to buy the larger ones and use my dremel with router bit and StewMac router plunge device to route the fret board for the new larger inlays. I can't find anything in the Guitar Player Repair Guide which speaks to this procedure. How do you go about lining up the new inlays and marking the fret board for routing inlays?

Many thanks in advance :D
 

DSR31

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About inlays on an old Gibson ES 330. I considered reducing the size of the inlays but I'm not sure I have the tools to cut/shave the inlays without breaking them. Note that the ES-330 has very shallow routing for the original plastic inlays. Greg, if you could enlighten me on how best to resize these inlays I'll do that. I will still probably deepen slightly the current inlay routing, but sure, I'd prefer to keep the original size; that would be optimum. Also, if you could tell me what glue you would use that would be great. Thanks!
 

pshupe

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Sand paper and small files. Unless you are cutting from a big blank or from the shell, you do not need a special cutter. Just be careful with MOP dust. Wear a mask or better yet wear a mask and have a vacuum port.

Cheers Peter.
 

Brians Evil Twin

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Greg, if you could enlighten me on how best to resize these inlays I'll do that. I will still probably deepen slightly the current inlay routing, but sure, I'd prefer to keep the original size; that would be optimum. Also, if you could tell me what glue you would use that would be great. Thanks!
 

pshupe

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I do not think that will work for MOP. It's too coarse and not enough support.

more like this -





Regards Peter.

PS - but if you do not need to cut a big sheet just use sand paper. I think epoxy is usually used for gluing inlays. You can tint it with dust from the board or use dyes.
 

BCRGreg

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About inlays on an old Gibson ES 330. I considered reducing the size of the inlays but I'm not sure I have the tools to cut/shave the inlays without breaking them. Note that the ES-330 has very shallow routing for the original plastic inlays. Greg, if you could enlighten me on how best to resize these inlays I'll do that. I will still probably deepen slightly the current inlay routing, but sure, I'd prefer to keep the original size; that would be optimum. Also, if you could tell me what glue you would use that would be great. Thanks!
80 wet or dry grit sandpaper and a flat surface. Work with water to keep the heat from compromising the material.....just go back and forth and reduce the size of the part. Then sand them thinner so that they will fit nicely in the routes, making sure to keep the top at a 12 in radius. Clean out all the glue from the route, put in a drop of Titebond 1 and press the inlays into the routes. Clamp and ignore for a day. Level them to the board and play the hell out of the guitar!!!!
 

eddie_bowers

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I built a Buldog kit Les Paul several years ago and it's served me well with constant playing, but the frets have worn badly. I have recrowned them a few times and am about to do it again, BUT it's probably the last time. They pretty much match my real LP fretless wonder right now, and I don't play it as much because of that.
I'm going to check out the refretting threads, but while i'm at it I thought about changing the fretboard radius to 10. I prefer the feel of the PRS radius, so that's what i'm going for.
All that to ask:
What do I do about the inlays?
Can I sand right through them and hope they are thick enough. Do I pull them out. If so, How?
 

Roxy13

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First of all, I want to thank you, Greg, as this thread had me so engrossed I have read the entire thing and taken notes! I wish I were closer to you so I could pay for an apprenticeship. I also wish I had known about this thread sooner than last night :)

I'm not sure if this thread is still active, but you seem to be the man to ask so I will try. This is a MIJ singlecut with a thin poly finish. I bought it like this so no idea how exactly something like this happened, but there is a fairly large area on the side near the jack that is down to the bare mahogany, and I would like to repair it as well as I can.

Question 1: I feel I should repair the dented area with mahogany shavings and thin CA glue. Should I first see if it can be steamed out?

Question 2: What is the best material I can use for the black? Not sure if that is too large for black nail polish, or if nail polish can even be used with poly since it's more like a nitro product. StewMac makes some water based colors. They have a stain that can be mixed with alcohol but getting it opaque might be difficult. Although I have come close to an opaque finish redoing my kitchen cupboards with black MinWax stain just applying enough coats to get it there. They also have one that would need to be mixed with poly and sprayed. I do not have spray equipment (yet).

Question 3: what should I use for the top coats? StewMac sells a wipe on poly that can be applied with foam brushes or even a soft cloth. I'm guessing that is much too large to layer CA glue.

Question 4: After sanding and wetsanding what is the best polishing compound you would recommend?

IMG_20190808_110553541.jpg
 

Zeppelinguy685

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First of all, I want to thank you, Greg, as this thread had me so engrossed I have read the entire thing and taken notes! I wish I were closer to you so I could pay for an apprenticeship. I also wish I had known about this thread sooner than last night :)

I'm not sure if this thread is still active, but you seem to be the man to ask so I will try. This is a MIJ singlecut with a thin poly finish. I bought it like this so no idea how exactly something like this happened, but there is a fairly large area on the side near the jack that is down to the bare mahogany, and I would like to repair it as well as I can.

Question 1: I feel I should repair the dented area with mahogany shavings and thin CA glue. Should I first see if it can be steamed out?

Question 2: What is the best material I can use for the black? Not sure if that is too large for black nail polish, or if nail polish can even be used with poly since it's more like a nitro product. StewMac makes some water based colors. They have a stain that can be mixed with alcohol but getting it opaque might be difficult. Although I have come close to an opaque finish redoing my kitchen cupboards with black MinWax stain just applying enough coats to get it there. They also have one that would need to be mixed with poly and sprayed. I do not have spray equipment (yet).

Question 3: what should I use for the top coats? StewMac sells a wipe on poly that can be applied with foam brushes or even a soft cloth. I'm guessing that is much too large to layer CA glue.

Question 4: After sanding and wetsanding what is the best polishing compound you would recommend?

View attachment 398215
Hey there, for the black part, seal it with CA glue, and the easiest thing to use is India Ink from any craft store. It's the only ink you can get that's pure black and not blueish. You can get dyes or a stain but at $20 buck for a dye vs. $4 for the India Ink it'll work just as well. Because it's poly you won't get a perfect repair because it doesn't blend in like lacquer. Look into GluBoost. I've seen good things done with it. It's CA glue but has more of a working time so you can actually paint with it. Plus you can get the accelerator which'll speed up the curing time while you do the drop fill. Good luck.
 

BCRGreg

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Question 1: I feel I should repair the dented area with mahogany shavings and thin CA glue. Should I first see if it can be steamed out? Steam it out....the fibers are compressed by the impact and will eventually try to pop back.

Question 2: What is the best material I can use for the black? Not sure if that is too large for black nail polish, or if nail polish can even be used with poly since it's more like a nitro product. StewMac makes some water based colors. They have a stain that can be mixed with alcohol but getting it opaque might be difficult. Although I have come close to an opaque finish redoing my kitchen cupboards with black MinWax stain just applying enough coats to get it there. They also have one that would need to be mixed with poly and sprayed. I do not have spray equipment (yet). I would use layers of black nail polish and CA glue.

Question 3: what should I use for the top coats? StewMac sells a wipe on poly that can be applied with foam brushes or even a soft cloth. I'm guessing that is much too large to layer CA glue. CA.

Question 4: After sanding and wetsanding what is the best polishing compound you would recommend? Menzerna 400, available from Jescar.
 

BCRGreg

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I built a Buldog kit Les Paul several years ago and it's served me well with constant playing, but the frets have worn badly. I have recrowned them a few times and am about to do it again, BUT it's probably the last time. They pretty much match my real LP fretless wonder right now, and I don't play it as much because of that.
I'm going to check out the refretting threads, but while i'm at it I thought about changing the fretboard radius to 10. I prefer the feel of the PRS radius, so that's what i'm going for.
All that to ask:
What do I do about the inlays?
Can I sand right through them and hope they are thick enough. Do I pull them out. If so, How?
I am not familiar with that brand, so we must assume that the inlays might be thin. I would install tall frets and do the surface of the frets at 10" and leave the wood alone.
 

BCRGreg

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Here's a tip that I have been using for a while....

Wash a bag of marbles in naptha and put them into your cans of finish after you remove some to keep the level of the material close to the top of the can or bottle.....therefore reducing the oxygen in the container and extending the life of the contents.
 

ehb

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I still keep up on the more frequent posts on FlakeBook of Dork of the different chop jobs, stupid human tricks, and such the grumpy guy fixes...

Some 'before' pics would make most normal folks ill....

Beautiful work....especially blending that gold on the neck/head back a good while back....




One day though, the ass end of the "finished repair pic" truck is gonna fall off.... ;)
 




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