Artificially aging a guitar......Why?!!

jestremera

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I hadn't really thought about that before, but I am sitting here with my '09 Standard in my lap and when I read your post I looked at all the dings, dents and chips that it has and can tell you where they all came from. This one is very "personalized".
That's exactly what I mean. There are probably some really good stories in there.
 

SiLeach66

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Just my opinion, to each his own here.
I am so shocked that this trend to artificially age guitars actually has takers. I think It looks ridiculous. Does anyone else share this opinion?
I don't care what professional luthier does it, I can ALWAYS tell it's not natural aging. Something just looks wrong in my opinion. The worst is seeing guitars on Ebay or Craiglist whose owner has tried to "age" it themselves....OMG, some really horrific images there that I wish I could unsee.
The reason I am posting this is I'm trying to understand why someone would purchase a new Les Paul, or any guitar, and then have it aged? Why not buy an old guitar? Or play the hell out of your new one and be proud of every little nick from this gig or that. I am trying to figure out what could possibly be the attraction to an artificially aged guitar.
Thanks!
PS, please post pictures of "aged" guitars, good or bad.
For me it was a simple choice as I wanted a 2016 LP, but don't particularly like shiny chrome and spotless plastic, I kept it simple and will let the body age gracefully (I had considered dulling the finish but decided to leave it)
 

KenG

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Artificial aging isn't something I'd invest in myself (either by paying it to have it done or buying one already done). So Yeah I don't get it either really.
However what others do with their guitars means bupkiss to me as well so to each their own. Some of it (like HM) is done very artistically even if it is fake. Some of the finishes they've put on before the aging looked so great I'd have stopped right there but it seems the clientelle want to go all the way 99.9% of the time.
What's I'm curious about is the finish is there to protect the wood from sweat and oils which will soften and rot it. It usually takes many, many years for a well taken care of guitar to get to the point where this becomes an issue. Does anyone here thing the process could indirectly affect the guitars expected lifespan?
 

cider

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Personally, I don't understand aged guitars at all. But what do I know, I'm too young and a job to all this stuff ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 

Mats A

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I never understod this ageing either. I like to put the dings and age my guitars myself. But i see no wrong in it if it makes somebody happy.
 

blackat

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Some of you young guns that don't get it will understand once you hit 60 yrs of age.
There's just not that much time left to age a new guitar.

It's one reason for me anyway.
 

TradPro2

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Some of you young guns that don't get it will understand once you hit 60 yrs of age.



well, I am almost 66 years of ago

and while fully respect everyone's decision to artificially age or not

I am in the "it ain't right" camp - it looks awful to me, unkept, embarrassing

I have a 97 Lexus that sits outside in the sun, seriously "faded"

some see it as really cool, I think its terrible and am saving up to repaint it.....
 

uncle mud

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Are pro players buying these artificially aged guitars? I really think the checking on these guitars, especially the front of the headstock, looks horrible. I have some naturally aged Les Pauls, and none of them have checking on the headstock, after forty years of a working life.
 

uncle mud

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If you don't "get it"? You never will.

But, the simple answer is, vintage guitars are, in most cases, works of art. And, the whole "aging craze" came from the appreciation of the looks of well-aged/played examples. Not to mention, that "aging" also affects how the guitars sound and feel. Even if on a very small scale.

Also, there's a HUGE difference between "aged" and "abused". Checking, fading, and subtle finish wearing is the mark of a guitar that has been played, but not abused. And, THAT'S what we like - the "naturally aged" look.

The problem is, most of the people who try to do it, do so without taking the time to realize this, and think that the"aging" process involves "dragging the guitar behind a car/truck". When, in fact, it's a WHOLE lot deeper than that.
 

uncle mud

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I can't believe that they sound any different. The pickups and the electronics are identical as far as I know
 

bungle

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This thread is a relic.:hmm: Still relevant as I still don’t understand artificial ageing.
 

jstarr823

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The bar has been lowered. Again.
 

Deftone

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Wuuthrad

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I view it as a part of the Art of luthiers. Would I pay for it? Probably not. But I do love this one, what can I say?

6E5FC854-6B8A-4E4E-848F-33D83DF33972.jpeg
 


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