Artificially aging a guitar......Why?!!

rjshare

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wow, it's like the whole world has got completely different views on stuff...
 

Stevie 202

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While I'm not into artificially aged guitars, I'm not going to insult someone that likes them.

We all like something or other that some people don't like, guitar related or otherwise.
That was kinda the point of my 'red shirt' post.
It's your property. It's about what you like, not what I like.

Aint that the truth.

Fads come and go,guitar players are going through their ripped jeans phase. :lol:
cant wait for the departure of this one.
"Ripped jeans phase". Good one!

I like turtles!!!
Same here :wave:
 

Juan Wayne

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[URL=http://s68.photobucket.com/user/ancientscout/media/Mobile%20Uploads/20160406_083100.jpg.html]
[/URL]Me too..

Here is my old snapper..
Photos talk, bull schitt walks..wheres yours?
Oh man, that's a lovely dinosaur you got there!

I wish I had one I could show, but there's not much room at home for a proper monster habitat. Also, I suffer from preoccupying levels of clumsiness and I tend to step on things, so I can't let small living things run freely on the floor.
 

LeftyF2003

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I do have a question (and I mean this sincerely) for those that do buy their guitars aged, particularly the CCs. If you buy a JP #1 (for instance), then take it out on a gig and get a new dent that was not in the original guitar it was aged to match, does this decrease the value of the guitar?
 

rockstar232007

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I was able to find these in 5 minutes on Cl. all affordable.
I would take that 70's black beauty over a Murphy 59 any day.

VINTAGE 1971 Gibson Les Paul Custom Black Beauty Original - $4000
VINTAGE 1971, 72, 73 Gibson Les Paul Custom Black Beauty Original



1976 VINTAGE GIBSON LES PAUL CUSTOM SEE THROUGH CHERRY ELECTRIC GUITAR - $3250
1976 VINTAGE GIBSON LES PAUL CUSTOM SEE THROUGH CHERRY ELECTRIC GUITAR

1968 Gibson ES-335 Cherry Red Guitar Vintage - $3500
1968 Gibson ES-335 Cherry Red Guitar Vintage

1966 Gibson ES-330TD Sunburst Vintage Mint W/Tags!!!!!! - $4500
1966 Gibson ES-330TD Sunburst Vintage Mint W/Tags!!!!!!

1981 Gibson Les Paul Custom Tim Shaw Custom Patent Pickups - $2500
1981 Gibson Les Paul Custom Tim Shaw Custom Patent Pickups

1959 Gibson ES-225 TD CASH. 3200.00 OBO.
1959 Gibson ES-225 TD

1963 Epiphone Casino E230T - Original Case - $2850
1963 Epiphone Casino E230T - Original Case
Those aren't exactly what people are looking for in terms of "relics".

The "aging fad" (which has been around close to 30 years) is about creating the look of "golden-era" classics.
 

Frogfur

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Oh man, that's a lovely dinosaur you got there!

I wish I had one I could show, but there's not much room at home for a proper monster habitat. Also, I suffer from preoccupying levels of clumsiness and I tend to step on things, so I can't let small living things run freely on the floor.
Mine lives in a horse tank outside. Step on it..you won't forget it. Mines a girl.
Better get back on topic here..
 

ajay

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Gibson helps the relicing process with their stupid Les Paul Pickguard. I never figured out how a company with REAL engineers can't figure out how to affix a pice of freaking plastic without putting a dent and holes in the top and side of a guitar that they just spent many hours getting the finish perfect on. I know a lot of people call it "mojo", but I call it a dent and holes, plus the imprint of the support frame on the side. I don't know what Gibson calls it, but I call it stupid people.
Gibson installed the pickguard on mine. Thanks Gibson, but I could have installed it myself without any holes or damage, and I'm not a highly trained guitar builder like you claim to have factories filled with.
 

David Mccarroll

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I don't get it either, but that's just me. Are there any famous musicians touring with artificially aged guitars? Just curious..
Well...... let's see ..... While I can't actually remember exactly where I read it I believe Fender started doing relics at the request of ........ wait for it ...... Keith Richards! Who was a bit perturbed that he preferred the look (and I am guessing the feel) of his superannuated old dinosaurs like Micawber and said (try to imagine his voice here) "look guys ..... can't you just, y'know, give 'em a bit o' character, if you know what I mean ...." So - there you go! And I am pretty sure Fender started it, God bless 'em!

Andy Summers no longer tours with his old Custom Telecaster, he uses one of the first signature run reissues (Police reunion tour - great shows!), same with his old Dakota Red Strat, although I think the CS one is not relic'd.

Billy Gibbons PERSONALLY relic'd the first BG sig Les Paul.

Martin Rotsey from Midnight Oil asked Fender to make a replica of his gorgeous 1960 Strat - again, he was terrified that the guitar would get destroyed, or stolen, or whatever while touring - I played that replica when it was for sale - not buying that guitar was one of the biggest mistakes I have made.

Poster boy for modern blues Joe Bonamassa is often responsible for other people waiting for Historic Makeovers - he (kind of justifiably) comes first.

Even Page I believe uses, maybe not always, one of the Page replicas live.
 

Juan Wayne

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Gibson helps the relicing process with their stupid Les Paul Pickguard. I never figured out how a company with REAL engineers can't figure out how to affix a pice of freaking plastic without putting a dent and holes in the top and side of a guitar that they just spent many hours getting the finish perfect on. I know a lot of people call it "mojo", but I call it a dent and holes, plus the imprint of the support frame on the side. I don't know what Gibson calls it, but I call it stupid people.
Gibson installed the pickguard on mine. Thanks Gibson, but I could have installed it myself without any holes or damage, and I'm not a highly trained guitar builder like you claim to have factories filled with.
Well, there's the snap-on PG they implemented on 2015 and the 2016 HP line. Also, Standards are not supposed to have it factory mounted. Traditionals do, however, because it's the traditional thing to do, and most traditionalists don't like to mess with... well... tradition.

That said, I did put some soft stuff under mine as soon as I got it. The dent was already there but is barely noticeable, so I wanted it to stop there.

Now, considering how much extra money I paid for the extra man hours/weeks the full gloss finishing process takes, I agree it'd make sense not to drill it until the owner has decided to go that route. Seems more logic that way, but we gotta admit logic has never drifted Gibson away from their mysterious ways.
 

David Mccarroll

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Relic'd, not relic'd? Meh, who cares.... but I can tell you the one on the right, courtesy of Historic Makeovers, feels a damn sight closer to the one on the left than any off the shelf CS Gibson.

IMG_4736 by David McCarroll, on Flickr

I don't really care one way or the other, but years ago for depressing financial reasons I had to sell a spectacularly nice 63 Strat that was my gig monster for ten years - when I could afford a decent replacement I tried probably a hundred Strats, vintage, new, Fender, non Fender - and of the whole lot the best sounding and feeling one was a gold 65 relic, which on occasions STILL gets dragged out and gigged over this naturally relic'd dinosaur:

IMG_1823 by David McCarroll, on Flickr

In reality an awful lot of it really probably just comes down to finish removed off the back of the neck and fretboard edge rolling, which is what I find turns a block of concrete into a nice feeling guitar, but the other very, very real benefit of buying a relic'd (or for that matter secondhand) guitar is that if a guitar is flawless, that first dent just makes you die a little inside (just happened to my previously flawless PRS DGT - ouch), and I really, really admire people who have gigged with an instrument for years without an incident, but experience just says you have been very, very lucky - I have had guitars kicked off stands by accident, watched a stage roadie drop my Martin 000-16, saw a guy stand by and watch his toddler knocking my Les Paul over at a gig where there was no stage ("no worries mate, they're built like tanks these things!" - what the f**K does this guy know about guitars? I am assuming if my guitar knocked his kid over he'd have been a bit less flippant), I have even seen an amp dropped on one of my guitars - it just happens if you are gigging with multiple line ups - changeover is normally mayhem, and no matter what you do, someone else will eventually come along and screw things up for you.

And, no, the 53 does NOT go to gigs in the original Cali girl case, I wouldn't trust that to take the guitar round to auntie Norma's for tea and scones on a Sunday afternoon, and definitely no, the Strat does not go to gigs in what little is left of the original tweed case!
 

David Mccarroll

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Gibson helps the relicing process with their stupid Les Paul Pickguard. I never figured out how a company with REAL engineers can't figure out how to affix a pice of freaking plastic without putting a dent and holes in the top and side of a guitar that they just spent many hours getting the finish perfect on. I know a lot of people call it "mojo", but I call it a dent and holes, plus the imprint of the support frame on the side. I don't know what Gibson calls it, but I call it stupid people.
Gibson installed the pickguard on mine. Thanks Gibson, but I could have installed it myself without any holes or damage, and I'm not a highly trained guitar builder like you claim to have factories filled with.
That'd be the same engineers that brought us the eTuners .......
 

jestremera

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I don't disagree with the OP. For the most part, I like my guitars to come home in mint condition. I'll relic my own over time. I will say that many are done tastefully and look really cool but I've no desire to own them. I'm just not a fan of guitars that look like they've been thrown down stairs covered in 80-grit sandpaper a few times.
 

RustyNuts

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martin H

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I don't disagree with the OP. For the most part, I like my guitars to come home in mint condition. I'll relic my own over time. I will say that many are done tastefully and look really cool but I've no desire to own them. I'm just not a fan of guitars that look like they've been thrown down stairs covered in 80-grit sandpaper a few times.
I think age may have something to do with it. When I was a teenager in the 70s a used instrument with finish cracks and cigarette burns on the head was quite a bit cheaper than an equivalent clean specimen. You bought it if you couldn't afford anything in better condition, and would expect some sarcastic comments - "Did you get it new or used"; "bet it was glad to escape from the last owner "; "It looks like you play" etc.

I thinks that folks who grew up later when the vintage guitar mystique was really taking off feel differently.
 

Frogfur

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I have a common snapper too; named him 'Soup'. He's seven years old. Yours looks to be a bit younger than that, just guessing scale by your tubing.

Now back to your previously scheduled debate.
Its bigger than it looks..that's pvc pipe.
 

jestremera

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I think age may have something to do with it. When I was a teenager in the 70s a used instrument with finish cracks and cigarette burns on the head was quite a bit cheaper than an equivalent clean specimen. You bought it if you couldn't afford anything in better condition, and would expect some sarcastic comments - "Did you get it new or used"; "bet it was glad to escape from the last owner "; "It looks like you play" etc.

I thinks that folks who grew up later when the vintage guitar mystique was really taking off feel differently.
I'm an 80's kid so I get it. I loved John Sykes' and Randy Rhoads' Les Pauls (I wanted an LP because of those guys). While I wasn't a big EVH fan, I thought his Frankenstrat looked awesome. The same goes with Rory Gallagher's Strat. The difference, to me, is that there are stories that go with every nick, scratch, dent, crack, etc...

On a relic'd instrument, when someone asks the owner to tell the story of how that one ding got on headstock, they'll respond with, "Some guy at the factory carefully and strategically beat it with screwdriver just before putting it in its case"

It's def not a knock against those who like relic'd instruments
 

jestremera

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They are not for me but hey live & let live.
I've always wondered though how a guitar made to look 50 years old when new will look in 50 years, or even 1/2 that time?
I thought about this very thing earlier. It'll disintegrate in 50 years.
 

RustyNuts

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I'm an 80's kid so I get it. I loved John Sykes' and Randy Rhoads' Les Pauls (I wanted an LP because of those guys). While I wasn't a big EVH fan, I thought his Frankenstrat looked awesome. The same goes with Rory Gallagher's Strat. The difference, to me, is that there are stories that go with every nick, scratch, dent, crack, etc...

On a relic'd instrument, when someone asks the owner to tell the story of how that one ding got on headstock, they'll respond with, "Some guy at the factory carefully and strategically beat it with screwdriver just before putting it in its case"

It's def not a knock against those who like relic'd instruments
I hadn't really thought about that before, but I am sitting here with my '09 Standard in my lap and when I read your post I looked at all the dings, dents and chips that it has and can tell you where they all came from. This one is very "personalized".
 


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