Artificially aging a guitar......Why?!!

islandjimmy

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Just my opinion, to each his own here.
I am so shocked that this trend to artificially age guitars actually has takers. I think It looks ridiculous. Does anyone else share this opinion?
I don't care what professional luthier does it, I can ALWAYS tell it's not natural aging. Something just looks wrong in my opinion. The worst is seeing guitars on Ebay or Craiglist whose owner has tried to "age" it themselves....OMG, some really horrific images there that I wish I could unsee.
The reason I am posting this is I'm trying to understand why someone would purchase a new Les Paul, or any guitar, and then have it aged? Why not buy an old guitar? Or play the hell out of your new one and be proud of every little nick from this gig or that. I am trying to figure out what could possibly be the attraction to an artificially aged guitar.
Thanks!
PS, please post pictures of "aged" guitars, good or bad.
 

skysc

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im with you on that .

i never got the point .. same for relic stuff .. specially on stratocaster .. minor relic can be ok .. but some guitars look like they were drag behind a car on the highway for 5000 miles . its that supposed to be normal wear over the years . the only thing this guitar tell me is that the guy probably had a flood in his basement and the guitar stay there for a couple month .



lol

 

JM2112

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I never understood the "aging" thing either, whether it's a guitar that someone bought new and is trying to make look aged or a new Gibson guitar that came from the factory with an aged finish/appearance.

If someone likes it, more power to them. It's just not my thing. There's no substitute for time and playing that makes a guitar vintage, IMHO.
 

MATTM

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I am so shocked that this trend to artificially age guitars actually has takers. I think It looks ridiculous. Does anyone else share this opinion?
I don't care what professional luthier does it, I can ALWAYS tell it's not natural aging. Something just looks wrong. The worst in my opinion is seeing guitars on Ebay or Craiglist whose owner has tried to "age" it themselves....OMG, some really horrific images there that I wish I could unsee.
The reason I am posting this is I'm trying to understand why someone would purchase a new Les Paul, or any guitar, and then have it ruined by a fake aging job? Why not buy an old guitar? Or play the hell out of your new one and be proud of every little nick from this gig or that. I am trying to figure out what could possibly be the attraction to an artificially aged guitar.
Thanks!
PS, please post pictures of "aged" guitars, good or bad.
There are dozens of these threads already started (at least the ones that didn't get nuked). The search function is your friend in this case.

On a positive note, visit the Historic section and look at a couple aged LP's, especially ones from Historic Makeovers. They know how to do it right.
 

entresz

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The main attraction of a worn looking guitar is me
a) It is old
b) it's a good guitar (hence being played so much)

honest wear is ok (ie. buckle rash / some checking etc. ) ... sometimes I see guitars that are just trashed looking. People seem to go crazy over those on here. I think its' just a guitar that hasn't been looked after very well, others call it 'mojo'.

Each to their own I guess, and there is nothing after all forcing me to buy a beaten up guitar (whether artificially aged or actually old) :).
 

islandjimmy

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Yes, this one is good. It's subtle.

My friend just mentioned that people like distressed furniture that looks antique. I can understand that, I too think that looks good sometimes. So I guess it may be similar to why someone wants a aged guitar.
 

paulgibson

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I love an aged, nitro-finished guitar aged only by the passage of time and wear. Those fake-aged guitars look ridiculous and are easy to spot from an authentic one. I must say though, Gibson's historical line looks great.


Posted from Mylespaul.com App for Android
 

MATTM

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Those fake-aged guitars look ridiculous and are easy to spot from an authentic one. I must say though, Gibson's historical line looks great.

Posted from Mylespaul.com App for Android
Interesting since most of the guys that get "fake-aged guitars" are sending stock Gibson Historics to places like Historic Makeovers or Dave Johnson to have the work done.

We aren't talking about some kid with a razor and a poly sprayed Epiphone here.
 

circles

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fake aging sucks. there is nothing like the real thing. I agree that it usually looks dorky at best.
 

RangerJay

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I can sort of understand it as an "artistic statement." To me, some guitars are pieces of art in and of themselves. Aged instruments acquire a certain "patina," simply because of natural aging and natural wear and tear. Some of the aged Historics around here look beautiful, even though it isn't "natural" wear.

But I am also a bit dismayed. At times, it's like someone one's trying to play the blues without paying the dues. That's why I don't buy "reliced" guitars. I prefer to put my own battle scars on them, and even then, it should be from something unintentional, preferably that involves playing the thing in front of people.

Otherwise, I polish mine up and protect them. I like how my 1985 Strat (which I bought brand-spanking new in 1985) looks almost pristine from a distance, but when you look closely, you see that it has a look about it like a well broken-in pair of boots. Those boots fit my feet, and pretty much ONLY my feet.

My Les Paul Trad that I've been playing for a year just has a hint of scarring. Nothing pronounced. Mostly, my pick guard tells you that I rest my fingers on it at a certain place, and the bridge and bridge pickup show that I rest my palm there enough for my sweat to wear on the metal finish. The back has only a hint of rash, but it tells you how I position the guitar when I play it. The upper front shows you where I rest my arm at times.

My guitars. My scars. My stories.
 


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