Anyone know what this chord is???

sharptan

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x------------- 1st string
--1----------- 2nd C
--0----------- 3rd G
--0----------- 4th D
--2----------- 5th B
x------------- 6th

I'm thinking Csus2/B. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

The B note on the 5th string being the substituted root note making it a 'slash chord' (root not otherwise being C)
The D note being the 2nd of the C major scale, hence sus2
The G note being the 5th of the C major scale
And the C note on the 2nd string being the tonal centre for the 2nd and 5th :hmm:
 

huw

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You're not wrong. But it could be called something else too... :naughty:

Context is everything - depends a bit on what chords come before & after it...

However, with that disclaimer firmly in place :laugh2: we could name it a couple of ways.

There's nothing wrong with calling it what you did, it describes it correctly. Personally I'd be inclined to think about it as an altered G chord: if you ignaore the C on the B string that's a 1st inversion G major chord.

The high C, when looked at from that POV, becomes either a sus4 or an added 11th. It's a little unusal because you have the 3rd there too (the B) so sus4 doesn't feel quite right (although when I play it I expect the C to fall to the open B note, so it behaves like a suspension), so that probably leaves the add11 as a better way to describe it: Gadd11 (1st inv), or Gadd11/B.

But I'll repeat the disclaimer - the context could influence the most appropriate way to name it.

(How's that for hedging my bets? :) )
 

L60N

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x------------- 1st string
--1----------- 2nd C
--0----------- 3rd G
--0----------- 4th D
--2----------- 5th B
x------------- 6th

I'm thinking Csus2/B. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

The B note on the 5th string being the substituted root note making it a 'slash chord' (root not otherwise being C)
The D note being the 2nd of the C major scale, hence sus2
The G note being the 5th of the C major scale
And the C note on the 2nd string being the tonal centre for the 2nd and 5th :hmm:

A chord is made up of the 1st 3rd (maj or min) and the 5th.

So with the notes C D G B Im seeing a G chord ( G B D) inversion with a C in the bass (slash chord G/C) but hey, id have to play it too and im in work Bummer! :)
 

sharptan

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Thanks for your help guys. Much appreciated.
 

bobarino

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without context, i'd call it Gsus4/B

L60N said bass note is C but it's actually B
 

ext1jdh

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Possible chord names: Bm#5addC, Gadd4/B, Cmaj7sus2/B, D7sus4no5/B
 

SteveGangi

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Looks to me like a Gsus4, the sus4 being on the 2nd string and minus the root G on the 6th and 1st strings.
 

Guitar Freak

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So many names, one simple chord. Heck, just call it what you want and write music with it!

:cheers:
 

Lyle Caldwell

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Not a G sus 4. A suspended 4 or 2 is when you play the 4 or 2 instead of the 3rd.

That chord, if viewed as a G, contains the 3rd (B). So that would be a G add 11 instead of a G sus 4.

But as ext1jdh pointed out that chord isn't a G anything until the melody/harmony dictates it. Have the bassist play an E and it becomes Em7b13.
 

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