Anyone here ever "sold out" in regard to your career?

six-string

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Every job I ever had I did for the money (and/or any related benefits/dental/medical/paid training/paid travel etc. etc.)
Some jobs were pretty good, some were torture.
If I decided I didn't like the job, I found a new one.

I knew long ago that nobody was going to erect any bronze statues of me or claim I was the greatest employee that organization had ever seen (even if it was true! LOL.).

As many others have said: Look after yourself. Decide what matters most to you and put your effort there.
Life is short. Nobody ever says, "I wish I'd spent more time at work."
 

ErictheRed

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I've struggled with depression off and on for much of my life, and have done a lot of informal research about happiness and well-being because of it. People who say that money doesn't buy happiness seem to be correct: the only correlation between money and happiness that I'm aware of exists down at the lower end of the spectrum. Once a person is out of the poverty range (or a little bit beyond), there isn't a correlation between making more money and increased happiness.

However, there are huge correlations between time spent outside and overall happiness, as well as exercise and happiness, being able to pursue creative endeavors and happiness, etc. I wouldn't say that my engineering jobs were making me depressed exactly, but I now have far more time to exercise and get outside during daylight hours. I have far more time to play guitar and surf and be with the family. I was able to write a book (and get it published by a major publisher) because I have two months off over the summer, etc. I often think about the extra money that I could be making, but it's been 7.5 years and I haven't left teaching, so...I dunno.

Do what's best for your overall wellness, whatever that means to you.
 

KSG_Standard

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Money doesn't buy happiness, money buys options. From my experience, if you're unhappy when you're poor or middle class, you're likely to be unhappy even if you have millions of dollars. Some of the least happy people I know have loads of money and lot's of stuff.

I don't even know what "selling out" means. As has been said before in this thread, we trade labor/skills/services/time for money. If someone is willing to pay me double for my labor/skills/services/time and I don't have to do anything illegal or immoral, I'm going to jump on that opportunity. I've moved around the country, changed employers and even changed careers...each time for a better opportunity and better pay/benefits...every time I did this I got more responsibility and more was expected from me...that's why the pay was better.

A chance to double your pay is fairly rare,
 

cherrysunburst00

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I have a job offer that I've been agonizing over for a couple weeks now. I've officially turned it down, but the company really wants me and continues to make concessions in order to get me to reconsider.

PROS:

I would literally double my current annual salary. At age 47, I can't imagine I'll get too many opportunities for that big a raise in the future. Like, ever again. My wife hasn't worked since we had our kids, doesn't really want to and wouldn't have to.

It's a huge corporation, biggest in my field by far - so job security, benefits, etc. are off the charts compared to anything I've had so far in my career.

My new office would be about 25 miles from my home, so I'd shave about 15 minutes each way off my daily commute.

The position itself is literally the pinnacle of my field in this part of the country, i.e. there is no higher point to which I could rise without moving several thousand miles west. We own our home here and love where we live. In short, I'm not moving.

CONS:

There is a big personnel management component to this job: nine direct reports, most of any position within this entire corporation. By contrast, my current job has exactly zero personnel management responsibilities. Managing people can be a royal PITA, and with nine reports the chances of at least one dud, and probably a few, are pretty high.

My current employer is great. The company is small and work logistics are very fluid as a result. I have tremendous flexibility in just about every aspect of my job. I am second from the top on the proverbial totem pole, so if I have an idea that I want to implement I only need to get it past one person. In this new position, there will be steering committees for the steering committees.

My new job would entail a lot of meetings. Meetings suck. It would also be more stressful. Stress sucks, and I don't always handle it well.

It would also entail regular travel that would take me away from my family. In general, the job would be a lot more demanding, making it more difficult for me to strike a healthy work/life balance. My wife and I have three young children. Me not being home, or not fully present/engaged when I am, puts a lot more pressure on my wife.

I'm facing a real quandary here. I'm not looking for advice (this is not one of those "what color pick should I use?" threads). I'm just curious if anyone else has ever sold out, professionally - made a career decision involving a significant amount of compromise in exchange for money, power, etc.

I know everyone has different motivations, but where does money/advancement fit into the career choices you've made?
I don't see it at all as "selling out." For me personally, it's not about $$$$$ (obviously,; I'm a high school teacher). And very happy. I chose happiness and sanity over $$$$.

I could go get certified to be an administrator and try to become a principal, but no thank you.

I would see a huge increase in pay. As well as headaches. I saw several "red flags" in your post. The one that stood out the most was your reference to not always handling stress well.

What good is all the money in the world if your health takes a major downturn? Can you enjoy it? Will your Family enjoy it if you become ill... or worse?

What does your Wife think??
 
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fry

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I've never been offered the opportunity to sell out, and that offer is never coming in my situation. I'm a very small fish in a very big pond. I'm in a situation of my own making, didn't do the right things and put in the hard work when I should have. I am comfortable and mostly happy, though. I don't want any more stress or BS than I currently have, which isn't much. I put in my 40 or so hours and go home stress free M-F. The benefits are decent, and the vacation time is actually very good. The other part of my story is that my wife makes more than double my salary, so that helps. ;)
 

rolandson

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There's something to be said for you to have already turned this offer down. Something made you say no. So now they turn up the heat...?

What does that say about them and their ability to accept your decisions? Will everything you do with them require this much effort? Will all of your decisions be afforded similar respect? Will you be taking this job home with you at night like you are now?

There is also something to be said for being home to tuck your kids in at night.
 

rolandson

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and...let me add...
run any job offer by an attorney.

If the offer isn't in writing, get it in writing. If you're going to negotiate, negotiate....everything of significance. Including the proverbial golden parachute.

If it matters, then it truly matters. And an attorney will see what you don't.
 

fry

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I have a good friend who has always been in sales, and very good at it. When he was still in his twenties, he had travelled all over, seen everything, and was already sick of it. He got an offer that would involve little to no travel, something that he'd enjoy much more with almost zero stress. There would be a pay cut, however. He convinced himself the good stuff would offset the pay cut. A few months later, he told me he went back to the old job. He said, "turns out, the money matters".
 

Jymbopalyse

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You are only selling out to the people who are incapable of achieving greatness and want to remain the same.

Forever.

They call it selling out, because they can't achieve it.


It looks like you are "maturing" into the job field you have been tolling at for many years.
It will require a change in mind set.
Don't fight it.
It will take you to work you are not accustomed to.
It will take learning and practice too.

Sounds like the next level. With benefits.


Are you ready ?
 

timgman

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I'd say go for it. Regardless, it's a learning experience. I changed jobs 3 years ago. Although I deal with meeting after meeting, a large corp can sometimes be insulated from blips. and the earlier you make bank, the earlier you can retire.
I aint played guitar in months... that's the sell out... To busy. Cyber is insane these days
 

Bobby Mahogany

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Twice the money is certainly appealing but be sure you can stomach the report tasks
and the meetings you dread. You will have to change your focus a little from personal
achievement and motivation to career management and assets gatherings.
It can be done but don't sacrifice all of your happiness.
Time with your kids won't wait for you so just make sure you can be at home a minimum
amount of time.
You can plan the move with your whole family so that everybody is aware of the sacrifices to come
in order to achieve defined goals.
Maybe in 10 years you can move back to a different/better job schedule if needed.

Personally I have favored more time with my kids and I don't regret it.
We're like a solid team and enjoy most things as a family.

It really comes down to who you are and how well/happy you can be in the situation.

If you know there's too much stuff you don't like, don't go.
Good l*ck with your decision.
 

GUITARFORCE Pickups

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There is a lot to be said to sticking with your current company. As you mentioned, being away from family and the stress factor are things to seriously consider. If your happy with your current position and the money isn't that important...I say stay with your current company.
 
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filtersweep

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Do it.

LIfe is filled more with the regret of NOT doing things than doing things.

I sold my house, my cars, quite my job of 14 years, and moved abroad at 38 years old. Best decision I ever made.

Risks are awesome. They make you feel alive. Where is that 20 year old you that was a bit crazy and ready to take on the world? You don't even have to move.

I see loads of men in their 50s hitting a midlife crisis where they question what they have to show for their lives. New adventure, new inputs, new experiences--- all good.

Go for it. It really is NOT selling out.... as long as it is a legitimate business. Money does not buy happiness, but it certainly makes it easier to be happy.

You double your salary for a reason. Nothing of value comes easily.

I supervise the largest division of the company. I have had to fire several people over the years. It is just business- nothing personal. If I weren't firing them, someone else would. It is just part of the job.

As for travel-- I have traveled about a half million miles with my job. I only took two trips in 2020. Work travel will look very different in post-COVID times--- assuming we ever get there. But it does suck in many ways--- been to amazing places, but it is just airports, hotels, and office buildings. But it makes me appreciate my kids more when I am home, not take anyone for granted, makes me more present, etc. It is good to miss your family sometimes. And you can probably negotiate some of the points related to work/life balance.
 

jc2000

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Im 55 and have been at my job for 21 years. I would love to make a change, but at this age Im a slave to my pay check....
 

JLT73

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I'm 36 and did something similar 2 years ago. It has been great. Its a different rhythm to get into but overall everything is much better. Having no debt and a very health savings account is incredibly nice. Do it. Once this is on your resume, you will demand more pay/respect wherever you decide/need to go in the future.
 

bildozr

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there isn't much I wouldn't do to double my salary.

Whoever said, "money doesn't buy happiness" has never been really poor. :laugh2:
But it certainly has diminishing returns on the happiness it does buy. I'm doing ok, to say the least. Being broke, and barely breaking even -> covering my expenses with a little extra left over (getting guac on my burrito without checking my bank) was the huge jump in my mental well being. Making enough to save, and buy some toys? Eh, not really any happier, I just have more toys to occupy my time.
 

Pop1655

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I could go get certified to be an administrator and try to become a principal, but no thank you.
I wish my daughter had stayed in the classroom.
ISD politics is some crazy stuff everywhere.
 


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