Anyone had the guts to do this to a new LP?

endial

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Well, hell.

I'll chime in here 'cause it just seems to be fun at this point.

Note that there are weeks and weeks of guitar not being played between "Tries".

2007 Junior. Sticky-assed neck.
Okay now, one must understand that this neck is SO lacking in the plasticizer/cure/hardener department that once it gets sticky (two minutes of play) there is still residual stickiness on my hands when going to another guitar. That kinda sticky.

First try- Four ought steel wool applied cautiously, and with taped off pup. Next day, or so- Neck still sticky.

Repeat first try. Didn't bother with taping pup. Wiped down with mineral spirits. Nice. For a couple days.

Second try- Four ought again. Vigorously this time. Taped off pup, because...vigor. Wiped down with mineral spirits again.
Nice for a few days. Wipe occasionally with mineral spirits. Helps quite a bit and seems to help between the four ought attacks.

Third* try- 1000 grit sandpaper. F*ck it. Steel wool it again too. Wipe down. Nice for a week or two. Wipe down again. At this point is when I got a spray mister with mineral spirits in it to lessen the spillage of canister to rag applications. Spray towel lightly, and wipe down.
This is getting to be a pain in the arse.
-In all this, discovered that having mineral spirits in a fine mist spray-bottle is awesome.

Fourth try- Three ought steel wool. No tape. I don't care. Screw it. 600 grit sand paper too. Wipe down.

Repeat Third* try as I'm getting concerned I'm wearing away finish on an already too-thin 2007 neck and I want to retain every micron of thickness I can. Absurd? Sure. These are things that go through your mind, though. Also, still thinking about the all-important "Resale Value" of this dog. See below.

Fifth try- Sand lightly with four ought and wipe down, tape off tuners and "bee stinger" area because now I'm gonna spray a layer of Watco Satin lacquer on it. Don't give a damn any more. Not gonna sell it. It kills. It's my only Junior (at the time).

Lasted a year. Maybe. Lasted long enough that now I am fully prepared to re-coat it because as of last night, an hour into playing it I felt all the sticky coming back. Decided to write this reply here.

If you would like I can come back later and tell you how that went too, though, weather is not permitting here in Ohio for the next two days for it.
 
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dro

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I have used finger ease since forever. I like the look of a gloss neck. If you don't mind the dull look you can use a scotch brite. But if you do you will want to use a gray one as it is equivalent to 1000 grit sand paper. Can use steel wool but will have to deal with the oil. Will need to be cleaned with Windex Original
 

moreles

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It's not true that good lacquer is sticky. Unless something is genuinely wrong, like an idiot using silicone polish or some other substance that destablilizes, the finish, it is not sticky. Perspiration, etc. can cause that slight effect. Guitars are finished with glossy necks not for visual effect, but because it works, which is why this finish was adopted by master builders long ago. There's more friction from an unfilled mahogany neck with satin finish than a played-in gloss neck. I don't recall hearing Hendrix and Beck bitch about sticky necks. The Scotchbrite nonsense will yield a result that is considered better-feeling by some (and yes, new guitars with excessively thick gloss finishes are not ideal) but will be deficient over time. It's counter-intuitive to use a household abrasive pad on a great guitar. It takes very, very little to degolss a neck if you really need to do it, and it can be done with microfiber, almost invisibly, and perfectly acceptably. I would probably use 1500 or higher. 0000 or 00000 steel woll might work, but I never, ever use that crap on a guitar now that we have microfiber.
 

charlie chitlins

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OK...my kid has this remote control car.
He wants a bit of the finish removed and scuffed so he can paint something on it.
Here are the choices:
1-Cover it all up with plastic and tape, leaving the area in question exposed. Take it over to my workshop and pop it in the bead blast cabinet, blast the spot, blow it off with compressed air because glass beads get into EVERYTHING, unwrap/untape everything and paint.
2-Sand/scuff with sandpaper...maybe some 600, then 1000. Paint.
Results...exactly the same.
If you're the kind of guy that is drawn to #1, you should definitely use steel wool on your neck.
Use a trash bag and plenty of painter's tape.
 

charlie chitlins

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It's really not though, not at all. If you know what you're doing, I've gone back and forth dozens of times for dozens of people. I've been doing high end finishing for 30+ years.

It's literally no different than color sanding a finish during the finishing process.

No gloss finish, as in ZERO gloss finishes leave any factory as a Gloss finish right out of the gun. None. Every gloss finish you have ever seen has been color/wet sanded and then buffed out to gloss. All you are doing, if you do it correctly, is taking is back one step. Which can easily been done without removing any significant amount of material. It's not at all rocket science.

But Yes, if you play enough, it will get some gloss back. That is unavoidable and will happen on satin finished necks regardless of origin.
Exactly.
And a gloss is an easy thing to bring back if you know how...even by hand.
So many great automotive products.
I use a Hand Glaze and a Swirl Remover to go from satin to gloss very quickly.
I have a LP Tribute that was all satin, now it's completely glossy, like God intended.
 

LPTDMSV

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If you want that, go buy a Traditional Pro from 2009-2018. Gloss top and satin back/sides/neck. Best of both worlds.
Yeah, and after you've played them for a while the back of the neck goes shiny! So much for satin!
 

Thrill

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Never done it to a Gibson, both my Gibsons have the "Faded" type finish, which I love for this exact reason, but I have done it to a few Fender strats and other guitars. That glossy finish on the back of a neck drives me insane. I do it to any glossy necked guitar I get that I plan to keep for a while. I just go over the back of the neck with some 400 and 800 sandpaper. Makes it super slick and smooth. And if you dont take it down to the wood, you can always polish it back up later if you wanna revert it back.
 

skydog

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I bought two guitars that have had the back of the guitar (and in one case, the front of the guitar as well) "deglossed' using the green Scotchbrite pads (or so I was told). I bought them because others wouldn't (the price ended up being really really low), because the guitars were good pieces and because I thought I could easily reverse things. Not so much. And the idiot who did it didn't take off the hardware and do a good job of things, he just sort of circled around it. And he used too coarse a pad.

He's one of those guys who swore this was HIS guitar, he could do anything he wanted to it, and he was never going to sell it on. But he did.

Never ever do this to your guitar.

First, every glossy necked guitar I've ever had has eventually played in. It's become non-sticky because as you play it you put thousands of micro-scratches in the neck over time, even if the neck still looks glossy.

Second, it scores the finish so that you have to take off a layer of finish down to the bottom of the individual ruts, and if the idiot that did this was stupid enough to use something too coarse, the whole point of having a fairly thin finish has made the process of restoring it dangerous.

Third, if you start with a glossy finish you'll eventually have spots that will return to glossy (ish) and things will look bad.

Fourth, returning the guitar to as-shipped gloss takes a long time and is tricky. Mostly it comes back to a sort of VOS-level finish and if you like that, fine. I worked forever on the one guitar that had a scratched-up top, and got it to a point where it now just looks badly maintained. The previous owner wanted it to look a bit reliced, and once done he decided it just looked stupid, so he sold it on at a serious loss.
@DrBGood
 

Victory Pete

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I use body powder on my hands to play. It eliminates friction and it keeps the strings clean so they last longer.
 

Bend'n'Slide

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I stripped the neck of my "never ever gonna sell it" guitar and applied an oil finish. The neck feels amazing but it's not something I'd do to every guitar and certainly not to a real Les Paul.

Yep, I did this to my old MIJ Telecaster. A used purchase and some dinks in the back of the neck but none to deep. Nice guitar but poly finish. Took a chance on gently sanding it back the finish with fine grit until I was just at the wood (keeping the profile) and then re-finishing with Danish oil. Worked a treat: was just enough to get rid of the annoying dings on the back of the neck and it now plays great. Really brought out the flame in the maple too -- but I wouldn't be doing it to either of my Lesters! If I had an old, beat-up Lester then I probably would consider it but not on a new one... I appreciate YMMV (!).

My '16 LP Trad definitely felt a bit sticky when it was brand new but it has certainly settled down over time (the nitro changing over time...?) and it's never really bothered me and certainly doesn't now, although I admit that I'm not an uber-fast widdly-widdly shredder!
 

Freddy G

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I spray the front and the back of the neck with Finger Ease, which takes care of the sticky neck issue. I've been doing this for many years on Gibsons with nitro finishes with no issues. On my cheap tele I'm definitely thinking of roughing it up as nothing seems to slick up the cheap poly.

Poly is actually pretty expensive! Just sayin' ....
 

DrBGood

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Like anything else, if you botch the job, it'll look like caca. If someone that want to buy my guitar want it glossy, I'll just polish it to a shine. I don't see a problem.

The satin finish I did looks like it came from the factory. Photos can't show that and you don't have to believe what I say about it, you're not a buyer for this particular guitar.

Secondly, I paid 300 Canadian dollars for that LP (that's 200 US for you below the border). If I "ever" take a loss selling it, I won't end up on the skids because of it.

2019.jpg


09.jpg
 
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Blues_Verne

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Well fellas, here's one who does it to ALL his guitars, be it very, very old ones as well as brand spanking new. WHY? Good question from people who never experienced a perfectly deglossed neck.
Can't find my thread here with my 2015 Trad which shows an example.
But look at my completely deglossed 2015 Deluxe Goldtop, including the "satinized" pickup covers, and think twice.
LP-Deluxe'15-Gotp-AWE_7b.jpg


Here's another one - you look at an old (40 odd yrs) neck with a grain you very rarely get these days...
Yam FG-512_Neck1.jpg
Yam FG-512_Neck2.jpg
 

Sct13

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Micro mesh....

start small till you find your texture...
 

LeftyF2003

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Poly is actually pretty expensive! Just sayin' ....

This is on a 50s CV Tele I think made in China. I've replaced everything but the neck and the body on this guitar. I may take a Scotch Brite pad to the back of the neck and turn it to a satin finish. I have that on my other Tele and much prefer it.
Trixie.jpg
 
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skydog

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you don't have to believe what I say about it,
I never said I didn't believe you, in fact I do, having no reason not to. What I said was just a caution to the OP that if he does degloss it, there's a good chance he'll be limiting his market if he ever decides to sell, due to the finickiness of the guitar buying public. The respondent linked to above, obviously one.
 

Chicago John

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De-gloss the neck to a matte finish to make it more playable on a brand new expensive guitar?


I just know it would play better matte, just scared to do it. It looks so pretty, but I’ve been told I can buff it back.

Who has done it and never looked back?


Stew Mac has a scratch remover compound that would do what you want. Just use a little bit and rub it along the back of the neck a few times, and you'll notice the stickiness will diminish almost completely, and the finish will be fine.


 

RandyP

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It saddens me that there are people who would actually do such a thing to their guitar or relic them either for that matter. Any destructive act like that, especially on a fine musical instrument like a Les Paul is beyond the pale.

I have a '69 Gold Top that looks like it's been through WW II. Every scratch and mark has its' own story. Each of these stories is another page in the book of that guitars' life. Who would relic such any instrument in order to pretend that they've paid their dues? Who would sand the neck and avoid developing a beautiful relationship with that guitar just to make it more slippery? Huh???

What is this? Guitar Auschwitz? Debating the fine points of damaging your guitar with either steel wool or sandpaper or some purposefully shitty finish? I would never sacrifice an instrument to my ego like that. It's like sacrificing your character to the devil at the crossroads and the devil always wins.

Some guitars have taken me a full year to develop a relationship with but those relationships were solid and resulted in beautiful, creative music.

Maybe like thinking folk who see it his way should start an SPCG - Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Guitars.

Play your guitar and love it for what it is. It will love you back. Sand it or relic it and it will just become another possession.

I've been on this list for years and have never posted until now. I probably won't see replies because I usually just trash the email unless the headline gets my attention. But whatever you do, if you reply or not, love your guitar for who it is, not how you want to be seen playing it or dispensing your wisdom as to how to ruin it. Images are fleeting. Mutilation is forever.
 

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