Anyone had the guts to do this to a new LP?

Lhdr

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De-gloss the neck to a matte finish to make it more playable on a brand new expensive guitar?


I just know it would play better matte, just scared to do it. It looks so pretty, but I’ve been told I can buff it back.

Who has done it and never looked back?
 

integra evan

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*I am not recommending this, this is simply my observation *
I think for it to last you'd have to sand off the finish completely. I de-glossed the back of the neck on my studio using coarse steel wool. It ended up just glossing back up again after about 6 months, couldn't even tell I had taken steel wool to it.
 

grumphh

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If the neck is sticky as is, and the guitar is a keeper, then do it.

If the neck isn't particularly sticky i probably wouldn't do it.

But it is your guitar, so do whatever you like :)
 

judson

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done it more than twice.....not brand new but new to me a 1990 Studio and a 1993 Studio.

then maybe a few months later both got stripped 100% and refinished by my terrible skills but i love em

if you degloss the neck with a scotch bright...your playing alot will bring back the shine as your hand with act like polish...weird but true.

you will also get people saying your ruining the guitar and the value will drop...well its your guitar and it if doesnt suit you do what makes you want to play it 12 hour a day.......
 

Thunder Dump

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De-gloss the neck to a matte finish to make it more playable on a brand new expensive guitar?


I just know it would play better matte, just scared to do it. It looks so pretty, but I’ve been told I can buff it back.

Who has done it and never looked back?
If you want that, go buy a Traditional Pro from 2009-2018. Gloss top and satin back/sides/neck. Best of both worlds.
 

LeftyF2003

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I spray the front and the back of the neck with Finger Ease, which takes care of the sticky neck issue. I've been doing this for many years on Gibsons with nitro finishes with no issues. On my cheap tele I'm definitely thinking of roughing it up as nothing seems to slick up the cheap poly.
 

LPaddicted

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De-gloss the neck to a matte finish to make it more playable on a brand new expensive guitar?


I just know it would play better matte, just scared to do it. It looks so pretty, but I’ve been told I can buff it back.

Who has done it and never looked back?
what.gif
 

AJK1

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De-gloss the neck to a matte finish to make it more playable on a brand new expensive guitar?


I just know it would play better matte, just scared to do it. It looks so pretty, but I’ve been told I can buff it back.

Who has done it and never looked back?
Don’t do it
 

dspelman

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Lol. Yeah, cause SANDPAPER is less damaging. LOL. Everyone (on the 'net) is an expert.
I bought two guitars that have had the back of the guitar (and in one case, the front of the guitar as well) "deglossed' using the green Scotchbrite pads (or so I was told). I bought them because others wouldn't (the price ended up being really really low), because the guitars were good pieces and because I thought I could easily reverse things. Not so much. And the idiot who did it didn't take off the hardware and do a good job of things, he just sort of circled around it. And he used too coarse a pad.

He's one of those guys who swore this was HIS guitar, he could do anything he wanted to it, and he was never going to sell it on. But he did.

Never ever do this to your guitar.

First, every glossy necked guitar I've ever had has eventually played in. It's become non-sticky because as you play it you put thousands of micro-scratches in the neck over time, even if the neck still looks glossy.

Second, it scores the finish so that you have to take off a layer of finish down to the bottom of the individual ruts, and if the idiot that did this was stupid enough to use something too coarse, the whole point of having a fairly thin finish has made the process of restoring it dangerous.

Third, if you start with a glossy finish you'll eventually have spots that will return to glossy (ish) and things will look bad.

Fourth, returning the guitar to as-shipped gloss takes a long time and is tricky. Mostly it comes back to a sort of VOS-level finish and if you like that, fine. I worked forever on the one guitar that had a scratched-up top, and got it to a point where it now just looks badly maintained. The previous owner wanted it to look a bit reliced, and once done he decided it just looked stupid, so he sold it on at a serious loss.
 

Dogbreath

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Sell it to someone who will love it the way it is and buy a Fender American Professional. They’re made with matte necks
 

RRfireblade

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It's really not though, not at all. If you know what you're doing, I've gone back and forth dozens of times for dozens of people. I've been doing high end finishing for 30+ years.

It's literally no different than color sanding a finish during the finishing process.

No gloss finish, as in ZERO gloss finishes leave any factory as a Gloss finish right out of the gun. None. Every gloss finish you have ever seen has been color/wet sanded and then buffed out to gloss. All you are doing, if you do it correctly, is taking is back one step. Which can easily been done without removing any significant amount of material. It's not at all rocket science.

But Yes, if you play enough, it will get some gloss back. That is unavoidable and will happen on satin finished necks regardless of origin.


I bought two guitars that have had the back of the guitar (and in one case, the front of the guitar as well) "deglossed' using the green Scotchbrite pads (or so I was told). I bought them because others wouldn't (the price ended up being really really low), because the guitars were good pieces and because I thought I could easily reverse things. Not so much. And the idiot who did it didn't take off the hardware and do a good job of things, he just sort of circled around it. And he used too coarse a pad.

He's one of those guys who swore this was HIS guitar, he could do anything he wanted to it, and he was never going to sell it on. But he did.

Never ever do this to your guitar.

First, every glossy necked guitar I've ever had has eventually played in. It's become non-sticky because as you play it you put thousands of micro-scratches in the neck over time, even if the neck still looks glossy.

Second, it scores the finish so that you have to take off a layer of finish down to the bottom of the individual ruts, and if the idiot that did this was stupid enough to use something too coarse, the whole point of having a fairly thin finish has made the process of restoring it dangerous.

Third, if you start with a glossy finish you'll eventually have spots that will return to glossy (ish) and things will look bad.

Fourth, returning the guitar to as-shipped gloss takes a long time and is tricky. Mostly it comes back to a sort of VOS-level finish and if you like that, fine. I worked forever on the one guitar that had a scratched-up top, and got it to a point where it now just looks badly maintained. The previous owner wanted it to look a bit reliced, and once done he decided it just looked stupid, so he sold it on at a serious loss.
 
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RRfireblade

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Ya, no one.....



Necks, frets, fretboards....

Nobody who knows anything about guitars would use steel wool.
 

dspelman

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All you are doing, if you do it correctly, is taking is back one step. Which can easily been done without removing any significant amount of material. It's not at all rocket science.
It has been my sad experience to have run into a number of those unfamiliar with any kind of science at all, who have *not* done the job correctly.

I've got a few satin-finish guitars (I'm thinking they're polyester finishes that have a significant component of de-glossing material added) that were never color/wet sanded. Several of them are 15-20 years old, have been heavily used and haven't become glossy. Yet, anyway.
 

OldBenKenobi

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I stripped the neck of my "never ever gonna sell it" guitar and applied an oil finish. The neck feels amazing but it's not something I'd do to every guitar and certainly not to a real Les Paul.
 


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