Anyone else tired of urban/city life?

Benjammin

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Thanks for replying. I've heard it was expensive, but the quality of life was good.

When I first moved here it was considered one of the (if not the) most "livable" cities in the world, but every year it's slips a little more. Cost of living is skyrocketing

The only advantage to living here is the weed :hippie:
 

Kamen_Kaiju

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I'll be damned.. I am less than 20 minutes from you I think.. I am 3 miles from Kiser lake state park.

MLP team up!

n3khtk.gif
 

LongBeach

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I have never lived close to a city or even a town for that matter but the older I get the more I think I might like to. We live in the sticks in Ky. 14 miles from the interstate 16 miles from the nearest store. My driveway is 2 miles long, I cut 12 acres of grass on our property every Sat. and check 2 miles of fence twice a month, the older I get the older it gets. The only houses I can see are across the river on the Indiana side and they are 5 miles away. I think it might be nice to be able to walk to the store and actually have a neighbor or two at least it would be a change, but according to my wife, I will never know, and probably die on the tractor cutting grass.

I grew up in this rural county.
First 10 years in LA was cool, but, once you figure out that the cost of living is just stupid, there are about a 2 million people too many, no real privacy, except in your residence, traffic nightmare, etc. It just gets really old.

But, you have a good point, it is nice to walk across the st. to the grocery store.
 

foxtrot

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What really stands out to me is how suburban life is supposed to be sort of a compromise between living in the city versus more rural or out in the country, but is really more like living in limbo in a way.

Unless you end up living right by everything you need, you still have to drive to stores and to work (even 10-20miles depending on the stores and where you work), there's still high population counts, a lot of congestion, traffic, pollution, etc. There's a bit more space and lower cost of living but it doesn't compare to rural life or being more out in the country. There's just this sort of endless suburban sprawl, blurring lines between urban and suburban, especially in western states with a lot of space where everything is expanding.
 

doitforvangogh

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We moved out of the city (375,000) last July to a small town(1,400) (my actual hometown) forty miles north.

Kids can walk to school. Wife can walk to get the mail, buy groceries, do the banking. It's so quiet that a week after moving in a car went down the street at 9pm and I was startled.
 

BBC

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I grew up in this rural county.
First 10 years in LA was cool, but, once you figure out that the cost of living is just stupid, there are about a 2 million people too many, no real privacy, except in your residence, traffic nightmare, etc. It just gets really old.

But, you have a good point, it is nice to walk across the st. to the grocery store.


I grew up in the county I live in as well, just never left. As a way of life it is all I ever have known. There was some action here today though, I came home early to straighten up the driveway that was rutted up from the hard rains the first of the week. Across the river in Indiana they were burning off the fields to start planting. Although not really visible in the picture they use a tractor with a flamethrower on it that shoots out flames about 30 feet, just drive around torching the fields, my entertainment for the day.

 

LongBeach

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Wasting any more time in LA where I'll never buy a home, is just that, a waste of my time. I can afford to buy a home here, but, common sense doesn't allow me take a loan for $700,000 to buy a cracker-jack, 1000 sq. ft. house all crammed together with the rest.

Knock a 0 off that # and I get a 2 bed, 1 1/2 bath on 2.8 acres in the sticks.
works for me!!!! And, I'll make a fraction of what I make now, but, I'm OK with that to!!

And see, I'm going to get me one of those nifty 4 wheel thingies you got too!!!!
 

journeymb

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When I first moved here it was considered one of the (if not the) most "livable" cities in the world, but every year it's slips a little more. Cost of living is skyrocketing

The only advantage to living here is the weed :hippie:

Yeah I learned that it's very livable in my urban planning class. Colorado has weed too;)
 

Digger

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I'm happy to say that I'm out on the tractor this morning, a lovely autumn day, doing some slashing.

Moss grows on the south sides of the trees here and I have a load of frogs in my dam. That means the air and water is clean and fresh. It's the sort of air that you can take great big lung fulls of without choking which is what I used to do in the city.

I have two seasons! Firewood & grass.
I'm currently moving away from grass to firewood and although the physical work is getting a bit hard I'm gonna keep trying as it gets me outside and keeps me using my body.

If I want to shoot a rabbit I can and I have fish in my dam if I have the need to fish. Mostly I use the nearby salt water lake system or one of the 3 major rivers to boat and fish in.

I'm on the water at least once a week often twice, and I love the beauty of the waterways and our wildlife.

Whilst there are minor annoyances living away from town overwhelmingly it's really the people that make the difference living here.

We are involved in the running of a major art show in town and the opening was last night and it was a fantastic night. Our local city has a population of 12,000 and from the members of the art society (mostly Grannies) through to the mayor, local member of parliament, TV station, ABC radio, artists, friends, rellos and neighbours the people are what made the night.

They are all so friendly just how we dreamed they would be before we moved from the city. You get back what you put in, with rural living, and that is my main message to anyone contemplating moving to the bush!
 

journeymb

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What really stands out to me is how suburban life is supposed to be sort of a compromise between living in the city versus more rural or out in the country, but is really more like living in limbo in a way.

Unless you end up living right by everything you need, you still have to drive to stores and to work (even 10-20miles depending on the stores and where you work), there's still high population counts, a lot of congestion, traffic, pollution, etc. There's a bit more space and lower cost of living but it doesn't compare to rural life or being more out in the country. There's just this sort of endless suburban sprawl, blurring lines between urban and suburban, especially in western states with a lot of space where everything is expanding.

Yes I dislike the requirement of driving to get essential things done. I have a friend in Germany and when he visited 2 years ago, his preconception of our suburb was that he could walk to the majority of places. It was very contrasting for him to have to drive 10 min to grocery store/gas/bank/one fast food place. Then 20 minutes to Walmart, hope depot, real restaurants, more stores, etc.

I just thought of this: What if there was like a gated "village" within a city? A small, village like place with its own town center, shops, and gated to keep out sprawl and homeless people, city wanderers, etc. Yet walkable to the rest of the city, perhaps with a streetcar/train stop within walking distance to the gate. Yes it would be very expensive, but it would give you a little both. The village would have some green space, nice houses, paths and such, yet in the city and close to the central business district/downtown.
 

OldBenKenobi

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What really stands out to me is how suburban life is supposed to be sort of a compromise between living in the city versus more rural or out in the country, but is really more like living in limbo in a way.

Unless you end up living right by everything you need, you still have to drive to stores and to work (even 10-20miles depending on the stores and where you work), there's still high population counts, a lot of congestion, traffic, pollution, etc. There's a bit more space and lower cost of living but it doesn't compare to rural life or being more out in the country. There's just this sort of endless suburban sprawl, blurring lines between urban and suburban, especially in western states with a lot of space where everything is expanding.

Suburban life has somehow managed to be the worst of both worlds. Not as convenient as a city, not as peaceful as the country.
 

Benjammin

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foxtrot

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I just thought of this: What if there was like a gated "village" within a city? A small, village like place with its own town center, shops, and gated to keep out sprawl and homeless people, city wanderers, etc. Yet walkable to the rest of the city, perhaps with a streetcar/train stop within walking distance to the gate. Yes it would be very expensive, but it would give you a little both. The village would have some green space, nice houses, paths and such, yet in the city and close to the central business district/downtown.


I'm not sure about gated, better city planning and some sort/degree of regulations could probably achieve the same thing, but I get what you're saying.

I think there's a lot of room for improvement in how our cities and neighborhoods are structured. I'd love to see more walkable cities, with shops, restaurants, parks and other recreation. All with the integration of metro lines and light rails when needed. That's one of the aspects I really love about DC. There's a lot to do and a vibrant atmosphere and once you're there you can get around very easily on foot and with the metro. Boston seemed the same for the few days I was there. Of course, living in either of those cities (even near them) is pretty expensive.

For neighborhoods, I've wondered what it would be like if they were more structured around a decent town center or park or some combination like that, instead of a bunch of subdivisions kind of all running into each other.
 

YoshiJimbo

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The quiet of the country is quite attractive, but two disadvantages that come to mind would be the extra gas milage of driving into town and city services, like emergency medical attention or fire, etc...
 

kevinpaul

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:wow:I eat what I run over. Never did hit any thing with meat on it. My dumb hunky luck!
 

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kevinpaul

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Yes I dislike the requirement of driving to get essential things done. I have a friend in Germany and when he visited 2 years ago, his preconception of our suburb was that he could walk to the majority of places. It was very contrasting for him to have to drive 10 min to grocery store/gas/bank/one fast food place. Then 20 minutes to Walmart, hope depot, real restaurants, more stores, etc.

I just thought of this: What if there was like a gated "village" within a city? A small, village like place with its own town center, shops, and gated to keep out sprawl and homeless people, city wanderers, etc. Yet walkable to the rest of the city, perhaps with a streetcar/train stop within walking distance to the gate. Yes it would be very expensive, but it would give you a little both. The village would have some green space, nice houses, paths and such, yet in the city and close to the central business district/downtown.

That is exactly like the place I live, paths where I ride my motorcycle a few stories, a barbershop and a coffee shop. Google Chatham Village, Pittsburgh PA.
A Main house for party's on Friday night happy hour and a Kentucky Derby party tomorrow. I can see town and both ball parks. Steelers and the Pirates.
 

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