Anyone else think pricing on certain models don't make sense?

wildhawk1

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No, planned obsolescence means you physically cannot use the older products or they have no ability to be fixed after a short period as spare parts are deliberately not sold after a short time.
Merely wanting to buy a nominally better/upgraded product of the same type as you already own where it will continue to perform is not part of the definition of planned obsolescence, but is absolutely 100% the definition of upselling.

I understand the we no longer offer support as in don't call us after a product has been discontinued but taking down software from a website and offering no replacement parts is the ultimate forced upsell.

Fender yanked their Fuse software used by older Mustang, XD and my favorite X2 amps last year even though there's tons in existence and some still under warranty.

Parts for repairs aren't available on most amps these days. Tolex covered paperweights when they fail. More upsell.

Back to the OP's question about prices on some gear not making sense.

Some of my favs...

Gibson Les Paul Junior $1599
If Gibson could make the M2 in Nashville for $399 what cost 4x to make a Junior? The zenith of a stupid price IMHO.


PRS Silver Sky SE $849
$50 more will get you two Fender Classic Vibe Stratocasters.


Fender Tone Master Twin Reverb $1049
$650 more than a Fender Champion 100.
A better cabinet and speakers but $650 more? Not even close.
 

AdrianDSMer

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Honestly, the prices from 2019 until October 2021 were ok on each guitar. But the $300-$800 increase last year made people think twice before pulling the trigger. I hope customers are having less QC issues as they are getting the exact same guitar.
 

smk506

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Gibsons pricing is 100% sensible once you wrap your mind around the idea that they’re a marketing company that happens to produce guitars.

That’s it, that’s all there is too it.

You can go nuts trying to pinpoint the production cost on binding or gloss finishes, hardware or electronics and it will NEVER add up in any meaningful monetary sense. Never.
 

Jupper

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I'm going to go against the grain here and say that Gibson's actually been pretty reasonable in their pricing. I'm actually surprised with how we've had a pandemic over the last 2 years, Gibson has basically only raised their prices once with most models only getting about a $100-$200 increase. If you guys want to see price gouging, you guys should see how many times Fender raised their prices on their guitars over the last couple of years. Gibson Les Pauls are actually still CHEAPER than they were in the Henry Juszkiewicz era. Gibson Les Paul Standards going from $2499 to $2699 are still cheaper than when they were selling them for $3000+ under Henry Juszkiewicz.

As for Juniors and Specials being sold from the $1500-$1700 range, I think you guys have forgotten that people literally asked for this range of models. Before these came out, the only options were the Custom Shop and the Epiphones. The success of the Billie Joe Armstrong Junior a little while back showed that people really loved the idea of a vintage accurate Gibson USA line that fell in between Custom Shop and Epiphone. And we even have further options for cheaper options for Gibson USA in the form of the tribute line of Juniors and Specials that can be found for sub-$1000.
 

mudface

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It's always been save up your dough for a Gibson..... they don't hand these out at the Salvation Army no matter what rumours you hear.

It all makes sense when you realize a M2 isn't as popular as a Junior......... doesn't matter if the cost is the same to build.... demand has a impact on price.

I remember a few years back a Gold Top Standard was a $100 upcharge over a Sunburst.

Gibson can't build all those different models and finishes at the same time in the same numbers.... what sells faster ends up costing more...imagine that.

After all Gibson can charge what they want..... and you don't have to buy.
 

wildhawk1

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After all Gibson can charge what they want..... and you don't have to buy.

People will pay a hefty premium to satisfy the psychological desire of being associated with brand names and celebrities.

Indeed you don't have to buy a given product which is why millions are spent on marketing in an attempt to convince us all that only a certain brand of guitar, shoes, tires, yada yada is good enough.
 

mudface

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People will pay a hefty premium to satisfy the psychological desire of being associated with brand names and celebrities.

Indeed you don't have to buy a given product which is why millions are spent on marketing in an attempt to convince us all that only a certain brand of guitar, shoes, tires, yada yada is good enough.
You know,.. I never owned a pair of Nikes.... but I do have a few pairs of RayBans
 

CyFan

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Market position plus supply and demand dictates pricing for each model. Gibson's marketing department has a statistical understanding of it's customer base that would impress the unimpress-able. Most major brands do. The only substantive factor in raising a price sometimes simply comes down to the fact that the market will bear it.
 

2old2rock

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Prices for instruments in general seems to be a bit nuts, and you're paying for a premium brand. But all things are relative.

I own a Fender American Professional II Telecaster that retails for $1700 and that is as darn close to the perfect instrument as I've ever owned. But it doesn't do the Les Paul thing nearly as well as a Les Paul. My LP Tribute retails for $1200 and does its thing as well as any Standard I've played but for half the price. It just doesn't look as pretty and I'm not sold on the PCB, but it's a rock machine.

As a violinist I've been involved in long debates about antique instruments vs. new. The consensus is usually that older or more expensive is not necessarily quantitatively better. But there is the emotional component of owning a beautiful classic instrument that transports you back in time, and inspires a certain level of playing and interest due to the beauty, history and provenance of the object in your hands. The emotional aspect is important for inspiration to many people.

Sorry to wander off on a tangent... It all depends on what you like and what you can afford. Do you just want to create art with your instrument, or do you want your instrument to be a work of art in and of itself? There is something to be said for the inspiration a beautiful custom instrument can provide, and if it inspires you to pick it up every day and practice more and be creative, then it's worth the price IMHO.
 

musicmaniac

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It all depends on what you like and what you can afford. Do you just want to create art with your instrument, or do you want your instrument to be a work of art in and of itself? There is something to be said for the inspiration a beautiful custom instrument can provide, and if it inspires you to pick it up every day and practice more and be creative, then it's worth the price IMHO.
I agree with this statement.
 

CyFan

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Prices for instruments in general seems to be a bit nuts, and you're paying for a premium brand. But all things are relative.

I own a Fender American Professional II Telecaster that retails for $1700 and that is as darn close to the perfect instrument as I've ever owned. But it doesn't do the Les Paul thing nearly as well as a Les Paul. My LP Tribute retails for $1200 and does its thing as well as any Standard I've played but for half the price. It just doesn't look as pretty and I'm not sold on the PCB, but it's a rock machine.

As a violinist I've been involved in long debates about antique instruments vs. new. The consensus is usually that older or more expensive is not necessarily quantitatively better. But there is the emotional component of owning a beautiful classic instrument that transports you back in time, and inspires a certain level of playing and interest due to the beauty, history and provenance of the object in your hands. The emotional aspect is important for inspiration to many people.

Sorry to wander off on a tangent... It all depends on what you like and what you can afford. Do you just want to create art with your instrument, or do you want your instrument to be a work of art in and of itself? There is something to be said for the inspiration a beautiful custom instrument can provide, and if it inspires you to pick it up every day and practice more and be creative, then it's worth the price IMHO.
So very eloquently said.
 

afjungemann

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Makes you kinda miss Henry ,at least he kept prices within reason and threw in some AFFORDABLE special editions
2015 was only 7 years ago… surely you remember when Henry jumped prices to where a standard was $3500 for zero supply chain reasons but just because, right?

He also famously cranked up the prices of gibsons right when it took over in the 80s.

If I am missing your tone and this was sarcasm, my apologies.
 

mudface

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2015 was only 7 years ago… surely you remember when Henry jumped prices to where a standard was $3500 for zero supply chain reasons but just because, right?

He also famously cranked up the prices of gibsons right when it took over in the 80s.

If I am missing your tone and this was sarcasm, my apologies.
Yeah... but you didn't buy just the guitar......you bought a lifestyle with that $3500..... (sarcasm)
 
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I think the historic line, which they have had for almost 30 years now, is the best example, every year they come up with something to keep consumers buying new guitars, "we got it right this time" as far as accuracy goes, they will purposely adjust features every year to make it more "accurate", and leave some features incorrect. As far as the USA lines go, you can't get certain finishes on one series/model, but it comes on others, pickups for example, neck dimensions, everything really. You might like the finish and neck dimensions on one guitar, but it won't have the pickups you desire as an example. It's all on purpose so that we will purchase multiple guitars, year after year. I can't blame them, it's a business, and this business model is obviously working for Gibson consumers.
Just like cars, clothes, shoes, phones, computers, etc :rolleyes:
 

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