anyone else here prejudiced against SS amps?

ARandall

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I think I meant to type heavy instead of big......
 

JMP

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I like amps that sound good, feel good to play, and inspire me to keep playing. My Peavey Bandit 65 does that, so does my Asessandro Deluxe Reverb.
 
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Spirit

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solid state are good for versatility with built in effects etc ,I like the Marshall code series ,you can find some great tones there ,some presets are jarg but it’s a great solid state,I’ve owned several solid state amps
no solid state amp has ever lived up to the valve amps I’ve owned ,I’ve sold loads of solid state amps and never regretted it can’t say that about valve
 

Zungle

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Nope...

I've always done fine playing solid state amps with pedals or multi-fx.....

I have 1 nice little tube amp and its a closet queen....
 

redcoats1976

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If an amp sounds the way it does because there's a computer in it that's programmed to make it sound like that, that's not the same category as a solid state amp where the tone is the product of the signal passing through discrete devices.

If it uses digital signal processing and software to emulate the sound of a guitar amp, that's a modeller.

The Fender Tonemaster amps are modellers focused on specific models. I think they are the smartest new amp design to come out of Fender in decades. I like the Tonemasters, but they're not solid state amps, they are modellers. Modellers made to replicate the sound of one specific amp and do it very well.

Fender could have created a Tonemaster that replicates many different classic Fenders. But that'd work against their desire to sell a bunch of amps. But it stands to reason that they could have added a selector knob for various models (Tweed Champ, Tweed Deluxe, Tweed Bassman, Tweed Twin, Brown Vibrolux, Blackface Twin/Bassman, and so on) and if they're using FRFR speakers in the cabinet, which I think they are, they could package a bunch of very convincing amp tones into a single cabinet. But if they did that, why would anybody buy the single amp model version?
my 5 watt vibrochamp XD has a voice switch,and emulatews about 10 different amps.hasnt stopped me from buying other amps yet though...
 

THAWK819

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I foolishly thought I did until my wife got me a Yamaha THR30ii last year. With the wireless adapter it's just too easy to pickup a guitar and play around. It helps that the tones and built in effects don't sound like a compromise to my ears at all, especially at bedroom levels, and are easily dialed in with the knobs on the amp itself. I have to confess that since I got it I only fire up the Friedman once or twice each week.
 

rjwilson37

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I have a Boss Katana, fantastic guitar amp that sounds great and it also comes with effects.
 
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hbucker

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Peavey Bandits are/were awesome little amps. Price point and function could take someone from beginner to the stage without any problem at all.
 
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1allspub

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TBH, I am kinda biased against SS amps. Probably unreasonably so, but... I am. Most likely because the SS amps I had early on were crap and when I got my first tube amp was like WHOA!!! So now that I think about it, it would probably be kinda fun to try a genuinely good SS modelling amp and see what I thought.

That said, I probably won't. Ha!
 

Big John

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Hi, I'm John, and I'm prejudiced against SS amps.

Disclaimer: The opinion of this poster does not represent the popular opinion of this thread. This poster, having played tube amps for more than 40 years, does not give 2, possibly 3, shits about other opinions on the tube vs. solid state debate.
 

kysrsoze

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I was for a long time. I had a Marshall Lead 12, and older Crate G-60, and a Katana 50 MK1, and didn‘t really care for the sound of any of them. I also had a hybrid Fender Super Champ XD head and that was better, but most of the models didn’t sound that great.

But then I bought a Spark 40. It sounds very good and has a lot of easy to dial-in amp and effect models. The Hendrix pack is VERY cool. Between that and the ease of playing along with backing tracks, it gets a lot of use.
 
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matthew bear

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I tried one of the crush combos not long ago at a GC, I was very impressed with it!

Also, powered kemper user here… 400 watt SS amp inside, I find it to be just lovely :D
 

Dolebludger

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I probably need to try out some modern amps if I can find a place to do it in this one music store town! I have not cared for the older model SS and hybrid amps I have tested in the past. But sometimes things improve.
 

cmjohnson

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Is it a modeller or is it a solid state amp? New test: If it requires someone to program any component in the signal path, then I'm going to call that a modeller. A solid state amp can be constructed of components that are not programmed by the user or at the factory. Put good components together in the right order, and it works. You have an amplifier.

There can be digital effects in that solid state amplifier, but as long as they can be turned off or bypassed, that's fine. They don't make the amp a modeller.

Modellers are dependent on software and without it they don't have a signal path from guitar to output.
 

ehb

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What if I said a discrete amp circuit is a program....

What if I said this is a computer....

1658111113392.png


:cool2:
 

cybermgk

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Is it a modeller or is it a solid state amp? New test: If it requires someone to program any component in the signal path, then I'm going to call that a modeller. A solid state amp can be constructed of components that are not programmed by the user or at the factory. Put good components together in the right order, and it works. You have an amplifier.

There can be digital effects in that solid state amplifier, but as long as they can be turned off or bypassed, that's fine. They don't make the amp a modeller.

Modellers are dependent on software and without it they don't have a signal path from guitar to output.
Can't agree with your test, because imho it isn't accurate. First it is based on what I consider fallacies. EVERY knob on that SS amp, as you are defining it, programs the components. That gain pot tells the underlying op amps or FETs how they operate, or which are used, it changes the circuit, i.e. programs it.

The real simple test IMHO comes from the word Modeller.

If the amp, attempts to mimic one or many existing analog amp via ANY means it is a Modeller. In theory you could have a completely analog Tube modeller. Though it would be more feasible to front end it with a little processing power with software to direct the internal physical switchs as to what parts of the circuit to use, We don't because it would huge, expensive and very prone to failure.

THere is no effective difference between an old Lead 10/12 and a Helix or Axe FX beyond the latter 2 not having an output transformer on board able to drive a speaker.

The lead 10/12 just has a set circuit, with SS components to produce a limited range of amplified tones, varied by the various pots on the amp.. It was designed to sound like other Marshall tube amps, with SS/Digital components.

The Helix, or Axe, or pick your modeller, uses a programmable engine to produce a wide range of amplified tones, as varied by physical controls and or software. They are designed to sound and perform like many, many different tube amps, just with SS and Digital components. In theory, it could be accomplished with the same kinds of components as the Lead amp above, but it would be very expensive to do so.

The only real difference in the two is the scope, or array of amp tones they mimic.
 

ehb

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EVERY knob on that SS amp, as you are defining it, programs the components. That gain pot tells the underlying op amps or FETs how they operate, or which are used, it changes the circuit, i.e. programs it.

Boom go da dynamite! My elusive but somewhat deranged point upstream a bit....

Any amp is a modeler.....just a singular model. If you (speaking generally, not pointing at you specifically) make a copy of the knob layout in the manual, do a spreadsheet of different combinations of knobbery, punch those in the fields of spreadsheet, you have a modeler with multiple models... Just because you have to manually change settings makes not a damn bit of difference....

Now, as far as that modeler running a program with RAM, ADC/DAC, RAM, DSP, etc., it is the same as reading from the spreadsheet and turning knobs with your hand.

It is really at base, analog shit going on inside that processor....still transistors, resistors, caps, and other shit....just little.....

See if this sinks in.... Go to a movie...Watch all that hattnin' up on a screen.
Ain't a damn thing moving...not one damn thing.

Go in the kitchen at night with lights off. Turn the light on and off as quickly as possible. Count to ten.
Pretty dark ain't it. Do it again and count to two in between pulses of light. Seems brighter.
Now have an actuator flip it on&off with only 500ms in between. Hella brighter. DO it with 10ms in between.... Bright as hell. More pulses per unit time but pulse magnitude is the same.

Voltage never changed. Voltage pulses over time did. Overall a hella brighter in the kitchen. Digital to analog conversion....redneck style.....

The movie is mazactly like we drew stick figures on the page corners in a notebook in school, each a bit different. Then fan the pages....a short movie. Bugs bunny and gang cartoons went away because it became too expensive to do it that way. So many hand drawn and hand painted cels per second to appear as real as Bugs and the rest, much too expensive to pay a building full of artists to do it... Next time you see Bugs, watch even his whiskers as he chews a carrot. At about 30 visual events per second, the brain sees fluid motion. Much more than that visually gets into overkill... Most cartoons suck ass in comparison to the old ones.... That's why. Event's per second...

Maybe oversimplification and there are a lot of stuff I didn't mention but a 'computer' so to speak becoming a particular model from RAM, where the rubber meets the road, is just a bunch of switches and shit....

That damn Jacquard started all this shit in 1801 with his gawd damn modeler..rat bastid.....
 

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