anyone else here prejudiced against SS amps?

redcoats1976

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the first amp i ever bought was a late 1990s line 6 spider 50 watt.it was passable until you cranked it up then sounded like ass.after that ive tried to at least get amps with a preamp tube and had a 50 watt peavey classic and a couple of other amps that were all tube.i recently tried an orange crush 35 rt and im amazed at how good it sounds,even cranked up it sounds like a decent tube amp.not going to dethone one of the higher priced fenders or marshalls,but value way above the $300 price point.while i wonr be getting rid of my tube amp any time soon,im impressed.
 

cmjohnson

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There are very few conventional solid state amps that I consider worthy. (That is, not modellers.) But the Marshall Lead Series amps from the 80s are all pretty darned good and a lot of Marshall aficionados like to collect them just as much as they like to collect late 60s and 1970s Marshall tube amps.

I own four Lead series Marshalls myself. All the rest of my amps are tube Marshalls, Mesa, and Fenders.
 

Jeremiah

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I was very prejudiced against solid state amps. But as I’ve researched my favorite bands’ set ups I have to come to understand that a lot of them use solid-state amps and even modelers. It is a great thing for me because I can neither afford these great tube amps nor do I have a place for them in my house (or an understanding enough wife not to throw me out)
 

EasyAce

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Until very recently I wouldn't have touched a solid state amp if you paid me by the minute. But then I saw Fender making solid-state "Tone Master" versions of the Twin Reverb, the Super Reverb, and the Deluxe Reverb, and my curiosity got the better of me. I took a guitar with me to Sam Ash and then Guitar Center and tried out the Twin Reverb Tone Master.

Both times, I was stunned.

The Twin Reverb Tone Master got exactly the same sound and depth as the classic tube Twin Reverb. It also has two things about it that proved irresistible:

Thing One---You can change the power wattage from the standard 85W to 40W, 22W, 12W, 5W, and 1W . . . enabling you to play a gig with it whether you're playing in a full-on club or a malt shop.

Thing Two---It's less than half the weight of the tube Twin Reverb. In other worse, you can carry it without feeling as though you're carrying a coffin by yourself---with the corpus delectus still inside.

I bought one at last a few days ago. Whether one of my Les Pauls or one of my ES-335s, this Twin Reverb Tone Master has just what I love and beyond for getting the sound I've developed for myself over the years.

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ARandall

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^ That twin is perhaps the only version that I would go for. The regular twin is just too big, too loud and too costly. However I could see myself getting that as I've always had a curiosity about the model......and I have tube versions of smaller Fenders which scratch those itches already.
 

joe_cpwe

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Prejudice against? Maybe.
I have three solid state amps. One is a cheap, 25 watt Park that is a real beater and perfect for practicing at home. One is a Marshall Lead 12, I got super cheap. Good at home and I use a mfx pedal in front of it, clean, to play at a small church. My 3rd is a Yamaha G50ii that has georgeous clean tones, reverb, and a parametric EQ. Seriously cool.
Not kidding...I spent a total of $135 acquiring all them.
They were too cheap not to buy, each have a small use to me, but I prefer tube amps to gig with.
 

Mr French

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I've owned a few solid state amps and are okay up to a certain volume. I had also owned Line 6 spider series which was great in early 2000s. Line 6 spider 2 and 3 both combo and half stacks, I think the line 6 spider 3 was 150watts?

Marshall Lead 12 was a very good solid state amp. Vox vt modeling amp was decent and had a single preamp tube.

Still nothing will ever beat the real thing and it just won't have the same tonal characteristics.
 

Mr French

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Peavy had a very good SS non modeling amp that sort of looked like a Fender Bassman but I can't think of the series. Owned one of those and was a great vintage sounding amp.
 

ehb

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No. Not at all....


(except that old Sunn slab POS)
 

ehb

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Peavy had a very good SS non modeling amp that sort of looked like a Fender Bassman but I can't think of the series. Owned one of those and was a great vintage sounding amp.

I have the old like new Peavey Vypyr Tube 60 modeling combo amp with the big ass Sanpera pedal that jumps the presets way up. (Final power amp is all jug)

I don't play through it because it is so damn loud....much too loud for the house....

Damn good amp.... Anything programmable, you must get under the hood and tweak the patches to make it happen....
 

ehb

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Modellers are in a different category from solid state amps.

A bit ambiguous in my opinion. A SS amp has one pretty much model that can be fine tuned with knobs. The sound is the sum of the amp stages, tone stack, and speaker. "Modelers" have multiple voice capability that can be fine tuned with 'logical knobs'.... The Fenders are modelers with one model, either the FDR or FTR. A model of the respective amp... The Roland with the plug for the EJ module is a modeler...and a solid state amp. One can build a stomp with 741s... One can also analyze the 741 circuit and use logic to recreate response of a 741 circuit. What is the difference if the software 741 circuit reacts just as a discrete 741 circuit?

Peavey impressed a lot of folks with their Transtube technology. In essence, the circuit 'modeled' the response of a jug circuit. The argument could be made that a small Peavey amp with Transtube I let my son have technically is a modeler. The difference is that it has no 'memory' capability for multiple models... only one tweakable model.... Difference is memory.

If one has an amp (jug or SS or whatever) and has several stomps in front of it, the argument can be made that the 'system' is a modeler. ;)

What do abacus, mechanical adding machines, and a Cray IV have in common?
They are all computers. The major difference is the Cray has memory so it can repeat a function multiple times without 'reloading from scratch'.. It's all logical addition anyway.

Food for thought.
 

ehb

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Computers running ProTools, Logic Pro, etc., are technically are SS and modelers too with the ability to analyze (encode) and model (convert model to audio out)...

Digital effects pedals are SS 'modelers'....
 

Leumas

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Not at all. My favorite amp I ever had was a bandit 112. That amp served me well for over a decade before it blew.

My current setup is a Marshall DSL40 A/B’d with a boss katana. I use the Marshall for minor dirt rhythm and high gain leads, I use the katana for a super shimmery clean, a processed gain lead with reverb and delay, and then I play with the last two channels for real goofy tones I can sneak into my palette.

I love tube for pure tone, but I also love SS/modeling for versatility.
 
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JohnnyN

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There are some very good solid state amps out there. Unfortunately there are (maybe rather was) some horrible ones too.
It's all about purpose and practicality.

I use tube amps and solid state analog pedals :)
 

gitmohair

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It's all about purpose and practicality.

SS amps have one massive advantage for me - they (well. good ones) don't have a "sweet spot" volume level in the same way tube amps do. So they're great if you're playing in Working Mens Clubs, at weddings and other social events. Organizer asks you to turn up/down? Just adjust the volume knob - with a lot of valve amps you'll be half an hour adjusting everything else to get your tone back, the audience will be pissed off and then they'll finish the meat raffle/speeches/whatever and ask you to turn it back up again :/

Horses for courses, and I'd rather sound consistently OK than awesome for the five minutes before the organizer suggests s/he won't be booking me again. And, as pointed about above, the JC120 is just a wonderful amp :)
 

8len8

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To me they feel different when playing them (very fast response), and they can’t emulate the tone of a tube amp for medium gain settings.
 

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