Any other people have this kind of paint wear?

TLespaul

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My LP Studio had this small worn-off area between the two pickups for I-don't-know-how-long. I did buy it slightly used in 2012, but it probably didn't have this at the time.

IMG_20181119_061947.jpg


I don't think it's actually from the pick. What I did notice is that the way I place my picking hand has the lower fingers going on and off the guitar's body, and if my nails are not completely trimmed I suppose it might slightly but consistently rub material off the finish and eventually off the paint itself.
 

ARandall

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Everyone is a bit different.
I brace with my pinky a lot of the time.....my strats for example have a quite a bit of pickguard scratching and I really don't play each guitar an awful lot (having quite a few).
 

somebodyelseuk

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My LP Studio had this small worn-off area between the two pickups for I-don't-know-how-long. I did buy it slightly used in 2012, but it probably didn't have this at the time.

I don't think it's actually from the pick. What I did notice is that the way I place my picking hand has the lower fingers going on and off the guitar's body, and if my nails are not completely trimmed I suppose it might slightly but consistently rub material off the finish and eventually off the paint itself.
Congratulations. That's the upside/downside of nitro-cellulose.
Look on the bright side. It happened to Gary Moore, too.
People pay a lot of money to have that done to their new guitars.
 

TLespaul

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Congratulations. That's the upside/downside of nitro-cellulose.
Look on the bright side. It happened to Gary Moore, too.
People pay a lot of money to have that done to their new guitars.
Any reason for using the nitro finish vs other more durable ones, then? Though the wear on my guitar (other than a few dings at the edges) is very much contained to that spot, which looks a bit weird vs what you'll usually might see.

No, because pickguard, on.
Yeah, it didn't have one when I bought it and I guess I didn't think of adding one.
 

rockstar232007

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Any reason for using the nitro finish vs other more durable ones, then? Though the wear on my guitar (other than a few dings at the edges) is very much contained to that spot, which looks a bit weird vs what you'll usually might see.
The two main reasons for the use of lacquer are the fact that it's a easier to repair, and it helps enhance the look of the wood.
 

TLespaul

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Not weird at all for a nitro finished guitar. It's called mojo.......:)

Yeah, but yours is kind of spread around and mine is just that small smudge.

And how come the wood color revealed underneath is so different between our two Les Pauls? They should both be mahogany, no? Or perhaps I didn't wear the coating off completely so it still whitens the wood a bit?

EDIT: I just looked around at pictures elsewhere and noticed this same worn guitar, so... I guess you don't own it, lol.
 
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somebodyelseuk

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Any reason for using the nitro finish vs other more durable ones, then? Though the wear on my guitar (other than a few dings at the edges) is very much contained to that spot, which looks a bit weird vs what you'll usually might see.
Nitro gets used by the higher end manufacturers, because it 'ages gracefully'.
Whether it "looks better"... to paraphrase a post I made in another thread - there is no such thing as sound quality, just sound, and opinion... same applies to looks, you either like something or you don't, that's just your opinion...
Todays nitro is not the same as it was back in 'the golden era'. It takes ages to cure. It's horrible to spray - easy to spray, but bad for yer health. It sinks into the wood grain eventually. It's not very chemically resistant.
Poly is rock hard, so when your new Strat is 60 years old, it'll still look the same - if you buy polish for a poly finish, you're wasting your money. It takes a lot of abuse, but when it reaches 'breaking point' it chips. It dries quick and is enviromentally less unfriendly than nitro. After the apocalypse, the only things that will survive will be cockroaches and poly finished guitars.
The main reason why poly is much more common than nitro is that it's cheaper to use.
Unless you're custom ordering a guitar, it's all irrelevant. Most of the world uses poly. I think, only Gibson, and maybe Ricenbacker, are the only mass production manufacturers using nitro exclusively, anyone else using nitro is only doing it on their topend and/or custom models.

As for the wood underneath and it's colour... maple and mahoghany aren't that different in colour - maple is almost white, mahoghany is actually similiar in colour to what most people think maple is. Also, maple gets dirty very quickly when exposed.
 
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gcbike

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Tops are maple.That mark is from oils from your fingers.same thing happens on neck over time
 

TLespaul

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Nitro gets used by the higher end manufacturers, because it 'ages gracefully'.
Whether it "looks better"... to paraphrase a post I made in another thread - there is no such thing as sound quality, just sound, and opinion... same applies to looks, you either like something or you don't, that's just your opinion...
Todays nitro is not the same as it was back in 'the golden era'. It takes ages to cure. It's horrible to spray - easy to spray, but bad for yer health. It sinks into the wood grain eventually. It's not very chemically resistant.
Poly is rock hard, so when your new Strat is 60 years old, it'll still look the same - if you buy polish for a poly finish, you're wasting your money. It takes a lot of abuse, but when it reaches 'breaking point' it chips. It dries quick and is enviromentally less unfriendly than nitro. After the apocalypse, the only things that will survive will be cockroaches and poly finished guitars.
The main reason why poly is much more common than nitro is that it's cheaper to use.
Unless you're custom ordering a guitar, it's all irrelevant. Most of the world uses poly. I think, only Gibson, and maybe Ricenbacker, are the only mass production manufacturers using nitro exclusively, anyone else using nitro is only doing it on their topend and/or custom models.
It sounds like there are no real upsides to nitro for anyone involved other than for Gibson asking for a supposedly justified premium for it.
 

PierM

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EDIT: I just looked around at pictures elsewhere and noticed this same worn guitar, so... I guess you don't own it, lol.
Ahahah no! This is a famous burst! Check out the goldfinger too, you'll be amazed by what fingers and playing position can do to your finish....


As I said, all my LPs sports a pickguard. ;)
 

TLespaul

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Tops are maple.That mark is from oils from your fingers.same thing happens on neck over time
Ah, that could be it. If it's not all-mahogany then the revealed light wood color underneath isn't as aesthetic, in my opinion.
 

JohnnyPhatsaqs

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Was just talking about this kinda of wear in my thread. Exactly why I’m adding a pick guard to my 2018 Classic. My pinky rests there quite a bit.
 




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