Any high-quality UK guitar kit makers post-Brexit?

MetroFox3000

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Hi. I’ve been looking at Thomann, contemplating the additional Import Duties I’ll pay now on a Les Paul Standard post-Brexit, i was thinking about making a Les Paul kit to my desired Burst specs. Does anyone in the UK (EU and North America are now too prohibitively expensive with extra costs on top) make and sell good quality guitar kits? It occurs to me, if not, then UK builders could perhaps jump on this opportunity, and start making enviable instrument kits. I’d pull the trigger on a Stew Mac kit if they didn’t have those ugly litigation-dodging cutaway horn . If anyone on the forum knows of UK kits, or even custom builders who take orders, I’d love to know. Thanks!
 

mono

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Hi mate. I like to think I have my ear to the ground on UK replica and 'burst building including kits, and I am not aware of any of decent quality. There are plenty of UK sellers who have kits made cheaply in the East and then import to the UK to sell here, but the market for a high quality version akin to the Bartlett kit must be miniscule I reckon.
 

dubster82

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I don't think you should be paying any import duties, that's part of the deal isn't it?
 

Zylo

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I don't think you should be paying any import duties, that's part of the deal isn't it?
Nope

All thomman do now on their website is to quote price excluding 20% vat
 

dubster82

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Nope

All thomman do now on their website is to quote price excluding 20% vat
So we pay them price excluding tax, and the vat is declared during the shipping, but no additional duty shall be paid?
 

villager

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uk pays vat on all EU imports from 1st Jan...
 

Jock

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That does not make sense, it is down to the UK Government how much sales tax they add. I do not see this as an EU issue. Exported good get Taxed when they are received in the UK so prices in Germany will be 19% less than they were last year. You will add on the Sales tax that the UK want to add, along with any Duty. Just like importing from Japan. Or are the Germans trying to Double Dip us?
 

Jock

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HB Benton SC-Special TV Yellow
DE €239
UK £177
Exchange rate €239 = £215
UK Sales Tax ?20% = £212 plus any duty the UK State add
 

Zylo

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Its a special arrangement

Only pay one set of tax
Thomaan would have registered with hmrc
 

dubster82

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Exported good get Taxed when they are received in the UK so prices in Germany will be 19% less than they were last year. You will add on the Sales tax that the UK want to add
Exactly. You can see on the website the price is plus vat now and it all works out to be about 20% cheaper than it was pre brexit so the VAT will just get added on during the shipping process instead of it being included in the sales price like it was previously. I don't see the issue?
 

Brek

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Oh I am really confused now, so the eu seller collects vat on hmrc’s behalf? Sounds better than importing from rest of world as shipper skims a % off as well as the vatmans cut. If it’s business as usual makes it worthwhile still.
 
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MetroFox3000

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HB Benton SC-Special TV Yellow
DE €239
UK £177
Exchange rate €239 = £215
UK Sales Tax ?20% = £212 plus any duty the UK State add
From what I can tell, now the UK has left the EU, we pay:
(Seller’s price + any postage) + 20% VAT
+2% Import Tax on the gross cost
Paid in order to release from Customs.
 

Zylo

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No

there is no import tax or tarriffs
 

Jock

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I may be wrong, and often are, but buying from the EU should be no different than buying from Japan. We should not have to pay any duty, current duty added to Japanese guitars coming into the UK is around 1.5%/2%. When we receive our goods from the Shipper, we then have to pay the handling fee for the shipper then the 2% duty on the cost of the guitar. We then have to pay 20% Sales Tax all of those costs then the guitar is delivered to us.

So I would expect that somewhere in that process things will need to move faster or people will stop buying from the EU, but I should never have to pay Sales tax more than once. Or let me say "I Will Never pay Sales Tax Twice"

Free Trade as it works today only deals with added Duty and limited volumes of goods. Real Free trade is agreeing a price with a seller and then paying them that price and exchanging the goods. At no point should the State get involved, that is where we have the problem. The State act as a middle man, this is where the word "Free" is removed from the equation. Apologies for the Politics but when they are involved things go wrong and cost more.
 

Zylo

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Tbh
The best thing right now is to let things settle down
If you are buying from the eu just contact the retailer direct and see how they are managing the sales
One upside might be the eu retailers will now need to be more competitive with UK retailers so we consumers may benefit
 

Brek

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The irony is VAt was introduced in the U.K. to pay for our membership of the EU, unless your are a certain age you won’t know that. So when are they scrapping it? :hmm:
 

Zylo

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Taxes are like your guitar collection
Never goes down always goes up lol
 

MetroFox3000

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Thanks all for the input. I did come across this Les Paul kit (in the States) and have ordered one, taking into account what I *think* will be the VAT and Import Duties once it reaches the UK! It's a solid flame maple top from what I can see, with tidy routes, and looks to have the Gibson style truss rod route and nut?

 

murmel

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I may be wrong, and often are, but buying from the EU should be no different than buying from Japan. We should not have to pay any duty, current duty added to Japanese guitars coming into the UK is around 1.5%/2%. When we receive our goods from the Shipper, we then have to pay the handling fee for the shipper then the 2% duty on the cost of the guitar. We then have to pay 20% Sales Tax all of those costs then the guitar is delivered to us.

So I would expect that somewhere in that process things will need to move faster or people will stop buying from the EU, but I should never have to pay Sales tax more than once. Or let me say "I Will Never pay Sales Tax Twice"

Free Trade as it works today only deals with added Duty and limited volumes of goods. Real Free trade is agreeing a price with a seller and then paying them that price and exchanging the goods. At no point should the State get involved, that is where we have the problem. The State act as a middle man, this is where the word "Free" is removed from the equation. Apologies for the Politics but when they are involved things go wrong and cost more.
The „free“ trade deal is way more complicated than people think, because it‘s only „free“ if most of the product has been made in either the U.K. or the EU. So Marshall can „free“ trade an amp into the EU, because it‘s basically U.K. made. Andertons on the other hand cannot “free“ trade a Mesa Boogie amp into the EU, because it‘s American made.
This is because the U.K. has left the customs union. The U.K. Is now free to define their own import taxes. That means if the U.K. for example had an import tax on U.S. made amps of 10%, but the EU only had 2.5 % probably all U.S. made amps would be shipped first to the EU and then from there to the U.K. to avoid the 10% U.K. tax.
 


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