An odd behaviour with my new 59

Charvel2

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After lusting after one for about a decade, I've just bought a new 2017 59 Les Paul, and so far I'm totally smitten. I was in Glasgow a couple of weeks ago for a gig and went to Guitar Guitar. I tried everything they had, and this one stood out. It had a noticeably more aggressive tone, with a depth and woodiness that spoke to me. It wouldn't have been my first choice of finish - it's based on p102 of Beauty of the Burst - but it's growing on me. See attached pics.

I'm resisting my usual urge to swap the pickups whether it needs it or not, like I do with every guitar. I love the bridge Custombucker, but the neck is less articulate than I'd normally like. Too much "Ooh", not enough "Aah", if you know what I mean. But I'm going to stick with it and try to come to terms with the guitar as it is rather than attempt to make it something else.

Anyway, in listening to the tones closely, I discovered an odd behaviour I've never encountered before in my thirty-odd years as a guitarist: when playing the B note on the fourth fret of the third string, the fundamental dies away after a second or two, leaving only the octave harmonic which continues to sustain. It's like it has a built in Sustainiac, or natural feedback. It's most audible with the aforementioned neck pickup, but it's there acoustically when the guitar's unplugged. The same pitch in other locations on the neck doesn't trigger the harmonic, and neither do different pitches at the same fret. If I tune down a half step, the harmonic sounds at the fifth fret, though not as clearly.

It's actually quite a lovely sound and I don't regard it as a fault at all, more as a quirk of this particular guitar's character, and this Les Paul has a lot of character.

Has anyone else come across this in a guitar before?

LP2017.jpg
lp20173.JPG
lp20172.JPG
 

bossaddict

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Congrats on a real beauty and welcome to the forum!

I've never had that happen specific to a particular note on a guitar, but more so as a result of my amp volume and where I might be positioned relative to it.

Love the top on your R9!
 

Bobby Mahogany

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No answer for you but:

Congratulations on a very nice Les Paul!
And Welcome to the Forum
:thumb:
 

Pappy58

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Beautiful R9 you got there. For that harmonic thing, I would look at the 3rd string bridge saddle... Good luck! :beer:
 

lpthomas

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Looks like many of the CC Donna in terms of color. Is that p. 102 by coincidence? I don't even remember if Donna is in the book.
 

Charvel2

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Looks like many of the CC Donna in terms of color. Is that p. 102 by coincidence? I don't even remember if Donna is in the book.
It's part of a run made for Guitar Guitar in the UK where each guitar is based on a specific entry in BOTB. Checking the Gibson website, the CC Donna is very similar with the darker cherry and the almost bourbon burst on the lower part of the body. I'll need to dig out my copy of BOTB and check if it's the same guitar.
 

freebyrd 69

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No answer for you on the harmonic, but GREAT CHOICE on the axe! Enjoy!!
 

PierM

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Had this same "issue" with my R8, with stock strings. Was getting this on B as well, in couple of spots around the fretboad, very weird stuff. I unplugged the guitar and I've seen was string/note engaging resonance on some other guitar bits, never got what is was. Could have been a saddle, or a screw, I've no idea. They were kind of playing together as soon as the magic note was produced.

BTW, after changing the strings the thing was gone.

Congrats for the beauty!
 
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BBD

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Lovely guitar, good pick. Not had the exact thing you describe, but as others say, the strings or possibly a saddle might be the culprits. Since it doesn't trouble you, see if it goes away as you play the strings in or at next string change.
 

KBMelb

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If I understand correctly, I had a similar thing on my B4 and it turned out to be the saddle screw seat was oddly shaped and let the saddle angle up and the screwed would touch the string.
 

Mick Weiss

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I had a simmilar effect on my 67 ES-330, I found the pickup selector made a small vibration when in the middle position, just on one note.
 

Charvel2

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To be clear, this isn't a sympathetic rattle from some other part of the guitar. The note's actually morphing into a higher octave as it sustains, in a very musical way like controlled feedback, except it does it unplugged. I quite like the effect, as it happens!
 

mdubya

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My ES Les Paul does the harmonic double tone thing when the pickups are dialed in just so. I don't play it acoustically, though.

My SG Classic was doing it last night (P-90's) with a Colorsound Fuzz. :hmm:
 

Redfish

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I have an acoustic that plays a D note an octave higher than the one I'm fretting in several places on the neck. When I play a first position chord that contains a D it sounds like someone else playing a high D over the top of it. I love it. Some call it an overtone. As long as it's in tune and sounds pleasing I call it a bonus. Find ways to work it in your solos. Beautiful guitar BTW.
 
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Farquad

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I have one that does something similar. It has a wired ABR bridge, and the wire is hitting the string and causes that harmonic. I totally dig the sound, and it's only on 1 historic.
(probably only have one with a wired bridge).
 

jenton70

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Every SG I have ever owned has had that issue on the 11th fret of either the G or B string (can't remember which at the moment). Can't recall it with a Les Paul so I think a look at the bridge saddle is in order. Beautiful guitar.
 

jamman

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HNGD ,,,Love the Paint on that 1 .
Why would you swap anything on a guitar that already sounds like you like ? Love ???? Or does it ???? If all but the pups work for you , then Yes , try new pups until you find 1's that get it to where you want it to be .
I wouldn't do a pup swap , just to work on a guitar . For that ,I'd use a guitar I used as a tester for such things ....
 

korus

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HNGD, enjoy it!

As a first step, try lifting the 3rd string out of the slot on the saddle and move it to left or right, then play it again fretted at 4th fret. This test might exclude badly shaped saddle's slot and touching the head of the intonation screw while vibrating as causes, even before the next strings change.
 

guitarded_82

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Thanks for the replies, everyone. To properly illustrate what's going on, I made a little video and stuck it up on the YouTube thingummy. Apologies if you find my accent indecipherable.

My 2001 R9 does that too! It's magic, hold on to it.
 

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