Advice appreciated to fix this Epiphone

Lars Porsenna

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So I got a guitar some time ago from a friend. The idea was to make it a project, fix it and learn to play it.

I put a gallery up on Imgur - link here.

Unfortunately I'm not sure about my options here. I could try and resolder the wires in place and see if it works, but I need a scheme and I found some conflicting information online. I was also thinking of shielding the cavities and changing the pots - what types and brands should I consider? And maybe changing the machine heads?

Ultimately I'm not sure if it is worth it at all. My friend, who's more experienced that me, told me he never got it working, and that it might be a copy in any case. It could be simpler to just hang it on the wall, and buy one that actually works, but it feels... sad to sentence this guitar to never sing.

I would really appreciate your advice!

Edited to add: what makes me uncomfortable and uncertain is the way the wires run out of reach and out of sight. Other guitars have a single large cavity, but in this one they run in a long hole inside the wooden body.
 
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KStopper65

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So I got a guitar some time ago from a friend. The idea was to make it a project, fix it and learn to play it.

I put a gallery up on Imgur - link here.

Unfortunately I'm not sure about my options here. I could try and resolder the wires in place and see if it works, but I need a scheme and I found some conflicting information online. I was also thinking of shielding the cavities and changing the pots - what types and brands should I consider? And maybe changing the machine heads?

Ultimately I'm not sure if it is worth it at all. My friend, who's more experienced that me, told me he never got it working, and that it might be a copy in any case. It could be simpler to just hang it on the wall, and buy one that actually works, but it feels... sad to sentence this guitar to never sing.

I would really appreciate your advice!
Well, viewing the pics, it seems like a good thing to work on.
It has real Grover tuners, don't change 'em
Appears to be made in Jakarta, Indonesia in September 2000.
All you need to do is a simple rewire to get it working.
Change the pots if you wish, and if you do, get CTS pots.
Do not abandon this guitar, it seems like a beautiful player, and a great first guitar.
 

Lars Porsenna

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Well, viewing the pics, it seems like a good thing to work on.
It has real Grover tuners, don't change 'em
Appears to be made in Jakarta, Indonesia in September 2000.
All you need to do is a simple rewire to get it working.
Change the pots if you wish, and if you do, get CTS pots.
Do not abandon this guitar, it seems like a beautiful player, and a great first guitar.
Thanks! I don't like abandoning it, but I can't find a wiring scheme I can be sure of. And there's the way the wires run inside the body, out of sight, so it's going to be a faff to replace them. I updated my original post to include this.
 

ucsteve

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I would bring it to a decent shop and get the whole wire harness replaced. It would be done fairly quickly I figure by an experienced tech. Cant see that wouldnt be a fun guitar to bang around
 

Michael Matyas

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You could shield and rewire the guitar yourself and learn a lot in the process. Everything you need is available at Guitar Fetish, including complete plug in wiring harnesses for a lot of popular guitars. GF also has wiring diagrams. All this stuff is available at very reasonable prices. Check out their website. This is not an expensive guitar, and working on it could be fun, instead of a stressful experience. Good luck!
 

ucsteve

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You could shield and rewire the guitar yourself and learn a lot in the process. Everything you need is available at Guitar Fetish, including complete plug in wiring harnesses for a lot of popular guitars. GF also has wiring diagrams. All this stuff is available at very reasonable prices. Check out their website. This is not an expensive guitar, and working on it could be fun, instead of a stressful experience. Good luck!
I hate soldering...my guy is so much faster at it than i will ever be
 

Hogie34

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This is an easy fix. Like stated, there are several diagrams available to get this wired up. Seymour Duncan, Guitar Fetish and Stew Mac to name a few, have diagrams available. The only issue may be the tone pots. If you look in the control cavity, the mini pots are nearly touching the sides of the control cavity routes. You may not be able to fit a full size pot in those locations . It may just be the angle of the pics, but they look pretty dang close.
 

DrBGood

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JC is probably Indonesia and numbers indicate a 2000.

As for replacing eveything, it will not get it to play or sound better. Don't spend money on this, spend time and use it as a learning tool. You can make it play good as it was designed to start with.

First rotate those pots so tabs all point towards the middle of the cavity (like the diagram below). That will give you some space to work in. But the easiest would be to take them all out and fix them onto a piece of carboard or thin veneer with the same holes configuration. Fix eveything there and reinsert the harness once done and checked.

GJrJWvb.jpg


wiringModern.jpg

Then, once everything electrical is working, give it a good setup. Take strings off, with truss rod get the neck as straight as you can. Then check for high frets. If one seem high, tap it gently, it might just not be seated properly. Hammer and a piece of hadwood or plastic between hammer and fret as not to damage that fret. Then polish them.

Put on new strings, properly set action and intonate with saddles. Then play with pickup height to find their sweet spot. Start with bridge pup close to strings: ± 2 credit card thick. Set the neck pickup at least ¼" lower. Adjust from there. I can send you the whole procedure if you want, neck relief and pup adjustments.

Have fun doing it and take your time, it's worth it.
 

Lars Porsenna

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Set the neck pickup at least ¼" lower. Adjust from there. I can send you the whole procedure if you want, neck relief and pup adjustments.
You make a lot of good points, thanks! I'll stick with what I have to start with, and learn from the experience. I would appreciate it if you could send me the procedure!
 

Skit

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CTS pots are larger than the pots that are in there. It looks like two of them might be too close to the cavity wall to fit larger pots in there. Maybe get some Bourns pots to go in there. I wouldn't put too much money into that guitar it's not really worth it.

Like DrBGood said, it might be a good guitar for you to learn how to do setups. String height, bridge adjustments, neck relief, intonation that sort of thing.
 

Brian16Sg

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Like they said keep it simple for starters . It looks like you got two loose wires to resolder . on at the plug in jack seing one wire still conected there should only be one choice . were the pots are it looks like at the top left you can see a blob of solder with nothing and the length of the wire thats just hanging looks like its belongs there. You can get a soldering gun at you local hard ware store . some times there can be enough sexisting solder were you can just remelt it and at the same time push it and hold til it sets. Good luck
 

Brian16Sg

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Ok i was looking at the picture more and im not sure if that red wire goes on the pot now . dooes it come from were the pick up and selector switch comes from ? its hard to see. mabey a close up picture of the top right in that shot .
 

CB91710

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Don't get hung up on the shielding.
I've never found the lack of shielding to be an issue on humbucker-equipped guitars, and even on Strats, the impact is marginal.

More problems have been caused by poorly-executed shielding jobs than have been solved by good ones.

Wiring is really simple.
The pickups wires come into the big cavity and go to the volume and tone pots.
Those feed the toggle switch, which goes back to the output jack.

The switch and pots could be replaced, but they are probably just fine, and the wiring just needs to be cleaned up.
 

goodguy

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I would only invest the time to re solder the wires back on, new strings, adjust some things like intonation but I wouldn't put much else into it as it's a $100 guitar at best.
 

302mark

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Take your time with your project and after awhile with practice you can move up to something like these
 

Studio Pete

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JC is probably Indonesia and numbers indicate a 2000.

As for replacing eveything, it will not get it to play or sound better. Don't spend money on this, spend time and use it as a learning tool. You can make it play good as it was designed to start with.

First rotate those pots so tabs all point towards the middle of the cavity (like the diagram below). That will give you some space to work in. But the easiest would be to take them all out and fix them onto a piece of carboard or thin veneer with the same holes configuration. Fix eveything there and reinsert the harness once done and checked.

Then, once everything electrical is working, give it a good setup. Take strings off, with truss rod get the neck as straight as you can. Then check for high frets. If one seem high, tap it gently, it might just not be seated properly. Hammer and a piece of hadwood or plastic between hammer and fret as not to damage that fret. Then polish them.

Put on new strings, properly set action and intonate with saddles. Then play with pickup height to find their sweet spot. Start with bridge pup close to strings: ± 2 credit card thick. Set the neck pickup at least ¼" lower. Adjust from there. I can send you the whole procedure if you want, neck relief and pup adjustments.

Have fun doing it and take your time, it's worth it.
Do not make the neck as straight as possible with the truss rod.
You need to leave an amount of 'relief'.. In essence a small amount of 'bowing' in the neck.
This is a perfect guitar to learn repairs on.
Plenty info on Youtube for setup infos.
Yes indeed you could make this 'sing' and enjoy hours of playing and sharing it around friends and family as it isn't higher end.
As another reply said, Enjoy this repair and learning experience.
 

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