A Promise is a Promise, After All...

Roberteaux

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Many years ago-- so long ago that the Mad Hatter thread was still named OneHippie-- I made a promise to a fellow member in the aforementioned thread.

The member was my buddy, @BlankinLoud , and the promise I made to him was to provide him with a recipe for a very powerful bruise liniment that was compounded by a specialist in Chinese herbal medicine, which was thence transmitted to me.

The medicinal substance involved is a decoction, in liquid form. It's very simple to make, really: one simply adds 10 - 12 different herbs commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine to a mixture of ethyl alcohol and clean water. Following this, one stores the mixture in a cool-ish (but not cold) dark place, usually in a dark glass bottle or opaque ceramic container. Every few days one agitates the mixture slightly to ensure that the liquid portion of the formula circulates. The reason we use alcohol and water together is because the active ingredients in some of these herbs are soluble in alcohol, while others are soluble in water.

We age the stuff for at least 60 days before it's ready to be used, even though the liniment actually continues to grow in strength and effectiveness up to about three years. At that point, the stuff stabilizes-- and though it doesn't get any stronger it doesn't get weaker either, so long as it has been handled properly all along.

I was taught this, along with the formula itself, but since I first began compounding these liniments back in 1984, I have had the opportunity to observe at first hand that what I was taught and mentioned above is true: this particular formula doesn't get stronger (or weaker) after three years.

Others may, but if they do I have never compounded or used them myself-- even though over the last four decades I experimented with several formulas I was able to acquire by one means or another and it was all pretty much the same.

Another curious aspect to the various Chinese herbal-medicinal compounds, liniments, and what-have-you that I have made and experimented with over the years was this: that with the exception of but three outliers, every formula (a dozen or so, I believe) had far more in common with yet other remedies than differences in content. I found this to be very, very interesting because my informants came from such far-flung places as Guangdong Province, China to Singapore to West Germany and back to Orlando.

Weirdly, however, it's also the fact that this stuff I'm teaching the reader to make in this thread came to me by way of a specialist in Chinese herbal medicine who is not only not an ethnic Chinese person, but he's even a weird-looking red-haired white boy who lives in Trenton, New Jersey.

He's never been to China in his entire life, but he *was* able to study as an apprentice under yet another practitioner (also known to me) of herbal medicine who once vended raw herbs, various herbal compounds, and various Asian "patent medicines" out of a shop on Canal Street in NYC. He was born and raised in China, and was trained in traditional Chinese medicine before he arrived in NYC. Sadly, he passed away many years ago, but he sure did teach his red-haired student very well.

In fact, the liniment prescription I will present in this thread is the student's invention-- specifically his-- and that was the first (and last) time I ever actually knew the actual guy who came up with a given recipe. In all other cases, the identity of the person who originally formulated a given type was unknown-- even to the person who gave me the formula. Most of these decoctions could be proven to have existed for centuries befor my tired old ass was even born.

But, when it comes to how effective this New Jersey Brew happens to be... well, I'd say that as what I'd call a "Type 1" formula, it's the best of the best that I am personally aware of.

***************​

So, how good is that? The truth is that if you manage to get whacked, or to fall, or whatever, and now you are puffy and swelling up and red-- soon to be black-and-blue-- if you apply this liniment to the injured area immediately and apply the liniment about three or four times per day, the chances are good-to-excellent that you won't end up with that purplish bruise at all, period.

If you've already got a purplish bruise going, this shit will make it go away in about two or three days instead of the week or two weeks it usually takes to vanish completely.

That's how good it is after sixty days of aging. After three years, it's strong enough that you use a much smaller amount of the liniment to achieve the same end result.

***************​

For a laugh:

I was getting ready to make a new batch of my favorite Type 1 liniment (I ended up making just two liniments after studying several), when somehow I flashed onto having discussed this bruise liniment in a OneHippie post I made... like, I dunno... had to be at least six years ago... and BL expressed an interest in learning how to make this shit.

I solemnly promised to provide said instruction, but of course promptly forgot having done so. For his own part, BL maybe didn't want to bug me about it or something, but he sure as hell didn't forget.

You see: a couple of weeks ago I got pretty low-- this was a batch I made about four years ago-- and so I set about to purchasing fresh herbs to create a fresh batch of liniment... perhaps for the last time, as I'm no longer quite so physically active or in need of this sort of preparation as I used to be. Plus, I made a lot of it this time around-- possibly a full supply for whatever is left of my life.

While tracking down fresh herbs sold by the ounce, I suddenly remembered my promise to BlankinLoud-- a long-term friend of mine whom I have a great deal of respect for... most especially when it comes to his tolerance of me and various of my peculiarities as a being. That poor guy has put up with SO much shit from me over the years, that I'd go straight to hell if I didn't at least come across with this promise I made to him over half a decade ago... :laugh2:

But here's the funny part: I started sending PM's to the guy, to tell him that I was finally going to fulfill a promise I made to him. As I hoped, the guy said that he forgot me ever making some promise to him.

So I sent him two clues... and they were both so vague and nebulous that I cackled wickedly to myself as I considered odds of him ever remembering any of it. These clues were deliberately contrived to be misleading, even... but don't you know: about twenty seconds after I sent them, BlankinLoud wrote back with his correct guess as to what I was alluding to! :shock: :shock: :shock:

That guy? He's worse than me, man-- he don't forget nothin'! :eek2:

Scary dude, man! If you ever really piss the guy off, don't come running to me about the horrible payback he laid on you about seven years later! :rofl:

***************
Okay, with no further fanfare, this is what we've got-- these are our raw herbs:

raw herbs.jpg


Okay, I figure that I should start with the easily identified red-colored stuff in about the 8:00 position on the plate in the photo... after that, I will proceed clockwise, ending with the yellow-white shit that looks like somebody ran over a mushroom in the center of the plate.

I will first identify each herb by its Latin name as used by Western botanists, followed by some of the common names (if there are any), but will end with a phonetic version of its Chinese name, as it is most likely to be listed by those who vend this stuff as "Chinese herbs".

As it happens, some of these herbs aren't strictly Chinese and instead grow in several parts of the world. Several of these medicinal herbs will be found in various herbal remedies of a strictly Western tradition-- though almost always used in a way that is strikingly similar to the purposes of Chinese traditional medicine.

So, starting with the red shit, here we go!

1. Carthamus tinctoris, aka "Safflower"... usually sold as Hung Hua
This red stuff is a very powerful herb that tends to increase localized blood flow and to prevent excessive clotting that ends up being the black-and-blue bruise... it's really just a big blood clot, visible under the surface of the skin. However, heed this warning: if Hung Hua is taken by pregnant women-- even if only absorbed through the skin-- the active principles of this herb might actually cause miscarriage because it will attack an early embryo as though it were a blood clot, thus aborting the development of the fetus.

The Chinese have been using this shit as a substance to provoke an abortion, literally for centuries. Of course, Hung Hua is not the *only* herb to be found in the infusion that was developed to abort a developing fetus, but it's probably the strongest herb one would find in such an infusion-- and it's one of the strongest herbs in this formula as well.

I'm not kidding about this: you absolutely MUST keep Hung Hua the hell away from pregnant women, most especially in the earliest stages of pregnancy. Likewise, do not use "Red Flower Oil" as a tea for colds and flu if the patient is a pregnant woman.

I'm being serious as a heart attack here, people: keep the shit away from pregnant women!


2. Scutellaria baicalensis, aka Skullcap Root... usually sold as Huang Sun
This is the yellow stuff at the 9:00 position in the photo. There are over 100 types of "skullcap" growing on the earth, but Huang Sun grows only at the farthest east end of the Eurasian continent, especially in Russia, China, Mongolia, and Korea. Its purpose in this formula is that it is an anti-inflammatory agent that reduces swelling. In Chinese internal medicine, however, this stuff has been used to treat a great many disorders, from diabetes and dysentary to ulcerative colitis.

Do not expose people to this shit if they're taking warfarin or any other blood thinner. It's also good to avoid this herb if one taking statins, as one of its active ingredients (norwogonin) has appeared to interfere with uptake of statins in human test subjects.


3. Boswellia glabra, aka Frankincense... usually sold as Ru Hsiang
This is what the little whitish-yellow "pebbles" at the 10:00 position in the photo are: little chunks of Frankincense. The substance is made up of the dried, resinous extrusion of a plant that grows in the Middle East and has been used as a medicine in that region for at least 2,500 years.

It's kind of a newcomer to Chinese herbal medicine, though, having only been introduced to China by the Mongols during the reign of Genghis Khan... meaning that the Johnny-come-lately substance has only been in use in China for a little under 1,100 years.

This is still long enough for the Chinese to have found what it's really good for: it's another substance that breaks down blood clots, even if applied externally. Thus, you gotta keep this one away from the pregnant ladies as well.


4. Cinnamonium cassia, aka Cinnamon twigs... usually sold as Kuei Pi Chih
This is just good ol' cinnamon-- same as the spice. The only difference is that instead of just using the bark, here we'll be using the entire twig. Sometimes these twigs will be cut into sections, as in the photo... but other times you'll get actual little twigs.

You cannot substitute grocery store cinnamon for this ingredient, as some of the active ingredients of this herb are found in the bark, while other principals are in its heartwood.

The function of this stuff is to bring localized warmth to the area under treatment, to reduce swelling, and to improve electrolytic functioning in the localized nervous system adjacent to the wound.


5. Commiforma malmal, aka Myrrh... usually sold as Mo Yao
Yes, this stuff contains both Frankincense and Myrrh. Add a small bag of gold dust to the brew, and they'd call you a Magi.

This stuff is yet more resin squeezed from a root-- but it's a different root than what we get Frankincense from.

As you can see, however, the stuff looks more or less like little blobs of cat shit. When you heat it up, it becomes gooey and like Frankincense, it smells absolutely divine. I should add here that I have never seen a bruise liniment (or any other preparation) that contained one ingredient without also the other. That is, they are almost always found together when used for medical purposes, whether the preparation is to be taken internally or externally.

The Myrrh's purpose in this mixture is identical to that of both Safflower and Frankincense, above; i.e., it breaks down blood clots, even via absorption through the skin. Thus, the warnings about pregnant women are in effect here, as well as warnings not to use this shit if you're on blood thinners such as Warfarin because it will act to make the blood too thin for the health of the user.

The history of Myrrh in Chinese herbal medicine is identical to that of Frankincense; the two together arrived in China at the same period of time and for the same reason: the Mongols, under Hulagu Khan (the grandson of Genghis) went to the Middle East, put an ass-kicking on the Abbisid Caliphate that was ruling that area until the Mongols showed up, and discovered the value and usefulness of Myrrh-- thence spreading the substance to all parts of the Mongol Empire.


6. Gynura pinnatafida, aka Pseudo-Ginseng... usually sold as Tien Chi
This grayish stuff at about the 2:00 position looks a lot like Ginseng-- hence its popular name. Like Ginseng, it's a "tonic herb", meaning that it's good for homeostasis in all the systems and subsystems of the human anatomy, as well as being useful for things such as our liniment, where it acts primarily as an anti-inflammatory.

As a tonic herb, it is *not* superior to Ginseng. However, as a "medicinal herb" (especially in internal medicine), it has more uses than Ginseng. Besides use in osteopathic liniments, it's also used to treat epistaxis, bleeding ulcers, hepatitis, liver problems, intestinal cancer, and a few other very serious ailments. That's why this herb is often found as the most expensive ingredient in our witches' brew.


7. Paeonia albiflora, aka White Peony... usually sold as Pai Shao
Another Asian import, both the red and white version of this herb do the same thing, which is tonify blood, establish a higher pain threshold, and to reduce muscle cramps and swelling.

It's the stuff that looks kind of like short tongue depressors at the 3:00 position in the photo.


8. Glycyrrhiza uralensis, aka Chinese Licorice... usually sold as Kan Tsao
This a the yellow-colored, twiggy-looking shit at the 4:00 position in the photo.

There is literally so much to say about this particular herb that I'm going to say almost nothing about it. Seriously: if we wanted to get down to it with this one, I'd have to write about half a book on acupuncture, another half a book on qigong, and then I could finally start talking about how to actually use the shit.

What a pita! So, instead of all that I will say here only that this is one of the most important of the "50 Essential Herbs of Chinese Medicine" and it's capable of some mind-blowing shit. However, in this formula of ours, the herb is mainly in there to act as a sort of catalyst that both buffers the other herbs, and also encourages the active ingredients to co-mingle- to literally combine chemically to produce third compounds that aren't found in any of the other herbs at all.

In the very quaint, super old-school parlance of the Chinese apothecary, it is said that Licorice is a match-maker in that it "causes the other herbs to marry and have children".

God, how I wish I could talk more about this one. It's some crazy, crazy shit. But if I told you, you wouldn't believe me... and for knowing better, I wouldn't care. :p


9. Rehmannia glutinosa, aka Rehmannia... usually sold as Shen Di Huang
This is the stuff that looks like a blackish-brown patch of tar at about the 5:30 position in the photo. The herb is sold in two forms: raw and another type that is steamed in vinegar. You want the raw form-- the black, ugly root. :p

This is yet another tonic herb-- in this case, however, it's especially good for the health of the blood. It removes toxins from the blood. It does this more readily when taken internally, but we'd save that use for treatment of internal injuries. The herb is powerful enough to deal with superficial bruising as a topical application.

Because this stuff likes to dissolve blood clots, you keep it away from people who take Warfarin and of course, women who are pregnant.


10. Nelumbo nucifera, aka Lotus Root... usually sold as Lien Tzu
Lotus Root is actually a foodstuff in a great many parts of East Asia and Southeast Asia, though it is the seeds that are eaten and not the roots. The roots are, obviously, used as a medicinal herb and its purpose is to promote rebuilding of damaged capillaries and veins, as well as to reduce pain and swelling. Taken internally, it also stymies internal bleeding while offsetting the more harsh synthetic pharmaceuticals that may also be in to staunch internal bleeding.

There's a ton of folklore and quite a few spiritual beliefs associated with this plant... to the point that I have even seen it referred to as the "holy lotus plant" in secular publications that weren't even discussing the medicinal use of the species.

And of course, I'd love to go on about this unto prolix, but then I'd have to ban myself for religious posting. :facepalm:


11. Angelica sinensis, aka Angelica or Dong Qai.... usually sold as Dong Qai
After Ginseng, this is probably the most widely-abused Chinese herb out there. It's a superior tonic, but what makes it very attractive to Asian consumers is that it is a more effective sort of tonic herb for females than Ginseng is. This is why it's sometimes called "female ginseng".

This stuff comes in two forms: as a small radix that's about as hard as a rock, but also as a much larger radix that is considerably softer. This is the stuff in the center of the photo that looks like a squashed jellyfish or a flattened mushroom or something. In our formula, either type may be used to nourish the blood and to dissolve clots. Thus, this is the 5th of our ingredients that you do NOT give to pregnant women or even expose them to.

This might seem a bit ironic, after I informed you that this same stuff is also noted as "ginseng for women". The disparity here is only that while this is a good tonic for women who are not pregnant, it's not good for ladies who are with child. However, it's not as powerful as Safflower, Myrrh, Frankincense, or Rehmannia. This gives a woman who has become aware that she's pregnant a safe "window of time" within which to stop taking the stuff for the sake of her child.


***************
Okay-- so there are our ingredients, and as we've seen the majority are found only in Asia, while a couple are from the Middle East and one or two might be found elsewhere on this earth.

Some have been "tonic" herbs-- meaning that they may be taken as a preventative measure against various diseases and for the sake of physical maintenance in general-- while other herbs are "medicinal" in the sense that you only use them for very specific purposes. From this one might also conclude that while all tonic herbs are medicinal, not all medicinal herbs are tonics.

***************
I do realize that this is a lot to digest in one fell swoop, but to do justice to you-- and to the topic itself-- it was necessarily gonna be a slightly lengthy production.

And to think: I haven't even gotten around to telling you how to prepare the herbs, how to put all this shit together once you've got that sorted, and how to really get it going.

:facepalm:

But anyway: I'm a little tired now and figure to leave this for you to chew on until I come back to it tomorrow. That is, my next post in this thread will be to discuss how to prepare it, how to put it all together, how to store it, and finally, how to actually USE it.

And then I'll go away! :rofl:

This next post won't be such a bear as this opener has been. But again: I figured that if you were going to do this shit for real, then I should give you the requisite information so that you at least knew what you were handling, there. There are safety concerns and such that you should be aware of. It would be irresponsible of me to address this topic without plopping a bunch of info on the table for your consideration.

But the next post is gonna be a lot easier for you to read-- and for me to write. :p

I'll be back! :squint:

:laugh2:


--R :thumb:
 
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BlankinLoud

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Many years ago-- so long ago that the Mad Hatter thread was still named OneHippie-- I made a promise to a fellow member in the aforementioned thread.

The member was my buddy, @BlankinLoud , and the promise I made to him was to provide him with a recipe for a very powerful bruise liniment that was compounded by a specialist in Chinese herbal medicine, which was thence transmitted to me.

The medicinal substance involved is a decoction, in liquid form. It's very simple to make, really: one simply adds 10 - 12 different herbs commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine to a mixture of ethyl alcohol and clean water. Following this, one stores the mixture in a cool-ish (but not cold) dark place, usually in a dark glass bottle or opaque ceramic container. Every few days one agitates the mixture slightly to ensure that the liquid portion of the formula circulates. The reason we use alcohol and water together is because the active ingredients in some of these herbs are soluble in alcohol, while others are soluble in water.

We age the stuff for at least 60 days before it's ready to be used, even though the liniment actually continues to grow in strength and effectiveness up to about three years. At that point, the stuff stabilizes-- and though it doesn't get any stronger it doesn't get weaker either, so long as it has been handled properly all along.

I was taught this, along with the formula itself, but since I first began compounding these liniments back in 1984, I have had the opportunity to observe at first hand that what I was taught and mentioned above is true: this particular formula doesn't get stronger (or weaker) after three years.

Others may, but if they do I have never compounded or used them myself-- even though over the last four decades I experimented with several formulas I was able to acquire by one means or another and it was all pretty much the same.

Another curious aspect to the various Chinese herbal-medicinal compounds, liniments, and what-have-you that I have made and experimented with over the years was this: that with the exception of but three outliers, every formula (a dozen or so, I believe) had far more in common with yet other remedies than differences in content. I found this to be very, very interesting because my informants came from such far-flung places as Guangdong Province, China to Singapore to West Germany and back to Orlando.

Weirdly, however, it's also the fact that this stuff I'm teaching the reader to make in this thread came to me by way of a specialist in Chinese herbal medicine who is not only not an ethnic Chinese person, but he's even a weird-looking red-haired white boy who lives in Trenton, New Jersey.

He's never been to China in his entire life, but he *was* able to study as an apprentice under yet another practitioner (also known to me) of herbal medicine who once vended raw herbs, various herbal compounds, and various Asian "patent medicines" out of a shop on Canal Street in NYC. He was born and raised in China, and was trained in traditional Chinese medicine before he arrived in NYC. Sadly, he passed away many years ago, but he sure did teach his red-haired student very well.

In fact, the liniment prescription I will present in this thread is the student's invention-- specifically his-- and that was the first (and last) time I ever actually knew the actual guy who came up with a given recipe. In all other cases, the identity of the person who originally formulated a given type was unknown-- even to the person who gave me the formula. Most of these decoctions could be proven to have existed for centuries befor my tired old ass was even born.

But, when it comes to how effective this New Jersey Brew happens to be... well, I'd say that as what I'd call a "Type 1" formula, it's the best of the best that I am personally aware of.

***************​

So, how good is that? The truth is that if you manage to get whacked, or to fall, or whatever, and now you are puffy and swelling up and red-- soon to be black-and-blue-- if you apply this liniment to the injured area immediately and apply the liniment about three or four times per day, the chances are good-to-excellent that you won't end up with that purplish bruise at all, period.

If you've already got a purplish bruise going, this shit will make it go away in about two or three days instead of the week or two weeks it usually takes to vanish completely.

That's how good it is after sixty days of aging. After three years, it's strong enough that you use a much smaller amount of the liniment to achieve the same end result.

***************​

For a laugh:

I was getting ready to make a new batch of my favorite Type 1 liniment (I ended up making just two liniments after studying several), when somehow I flashed onto having discussed this bruise liniment in a OneHippie post I made... like, I dunno... had to be at least six years ago... and BL expressed an interest in learning how to make this shit.

I solemnly promised to provide said instruction, but of course promptly forgot having done so. For his own part, BL maybe didn't want to bug me about it or something, but he sure as hell didn't forget.

You see: a couple of weeks ago I got pretty low-- this was a batch I made about four years ago-- and so I set about to purchasing fresh herbs to create a fresh batch of liniment... perhaps for the last time, as I'm no longer quite so physically active or in need of this sort of preparation as I used to be. Plus, I made a lot of it this time around-- possibly a full supply of whatever is left of my life.

While tracking down fresh herbs sold by the ounce, I suddenly remembered my promise to BlankinLoud-- a long-term friend of mine who I have a great deal of respect for... most especially when it comes to his tolerance of me and various of my peculiarities as a being. That poor guy has put up with SO much shit from me over the years, that I'd go straight to hell if I didn't at least come across with this promise I made to him over half a decade ago... :laugh2:

But here's the funny part: I started sending PM's to the guy, to tell him that I was finally going to fulfill a promise I made to him. As I hoped, the guy said that he forgot me ever making some promise to him.

So I sent him two clues... and they were both so vague and nebulous that I cackled wickedly to myself as I considered odds of him ever remembering what I told him I was about to keep my promise. These clues were deliberately contrived to be misleading, even... but don't you know: about twenty seconds after I sent them, BlankinLoud wrote back with his correct guess as to what I was alluding to! :shock: :shock: :shock:

That guy? He's worse than me, man-- he don't forget nothin'! :eek2:

Scary dude, man! If you ever really piss the guy off, don't come running to me about the horrible payback he laid on you about seven years later! :rofl:

***************
Okay, with no further fanfare, this is what we've got-- these are our raw herbs:


Okay, I figure that I should start with the easily identified red-colored stuff in about the 8:00 position on the plate in the photo... after that, I will proceed clockwise, ending with the yellow-white shit that looks like somebody ran over a mushroom in the center of the plate.

I will first identify each herb by its Latin name as used by Western botanists, followed by some of the common names (if there are any), but will end with a phonetic version of its Chinese name, as it is most likely to be listed by those who vend this stuff as "Chinese herbs".

As it happens, some of these herbs aren't strictly Chinese and instead grow in several parts of the world. Several of these medicinal herbs will be found in various herbal remedies of a strictly Western tradition, though almost always used in a way that is strikingly similar to the purposes of Chinese traditional medicine.

So, while some of what you see up there is most commonly found in Asia, quite a bit of it is stuff that I harvested myself here in Florida, as the shit grows wild. I will make various comments regarding each herb as I list them.

So, starting with the red shit, here we go!

1. Carthamus tinctoris, aka "Safflower"... usually sold as Hung Hua
This red stuff is a very powerful herb that tends to increase localized blood flow and to prevent excessive clotting that ends up being the black-and-blue bruise... it's really just a big blood clot, visible under the surface of the skin. However, heed this warning: if Hung Hua is taken by pregnant women-- even if only absorbed through the skin-- the active principles of this herb might actually cause miscarriage because it will attack an early embryo as though it were a blood clot, thus aborting the development of the fetus.

The Chinese have been using this shit as a substance to provoke an abortion, literally for centuries. Of course, Hung Hua is not the *only* herb to be found in the infusion that was developed to abort a developing fetus, but it's probably the strongest herb one would find in such an infusion-- and it's one of the strongest herbs in this formula as well.

I'm not kidding about this: you absolutely MUST keep Hung Hua the hell away from pregnant women, most especially in the earliest stages of pregnancy. Likewise, do not use "Red Flower Oil" as a tea for colds and flu if the patient is a pregnant woman.

I'm being serious as a heart attack here, people: keep the shit away from pregnant women!


2. Scutellaria baicalensis, aka Skullcap Root... usually sold as Huang Sun
This is the yellow stuff at the 9:00 position in the photo. There are over 100 types of "skullcap" growing on the earth, but Huang Sun grows only at the farthest east end of the Eurasian continent, especially in Russia, China, Mongolia, and Korea. Its purpose in this formula is that it is an anti-inflammatory agent that reduces swelling. In Chinese internal medicine, however, this stuff has been used to treat a great many disorders, from diabetes and dysentary to ulcerative colitis.

Do not expose people to this shit if they're taking warfarin or any other blood thinner. It's also good to avoid this herb if one taking statins, as one of its active ingredients (norwogonin) has appeared to interfere with uptake of statins in human test subjects.


3. Boswellia glabra, aka Frankincense... usually sold as Ru Hsiang
This is what the little whitish-yellow "pebbles" at the 10:00 position in the photo are: little chunks of Frankincense. The substance is made up of the dried, resinous extrusion of a plant that grows in the Middle East and has been used as a medicine in that region for at least 2,500 years.

It's kind of a newcomer to Chinese herbal medicine, though, having only been introduced to China by the Mongols during the reign of Genghis Khan... meaning that the Johnny-come-lately substance has only been in use in China for a little under 1,100 years.

This is still long enough for the Chinese to have found what it's really good for: it's another substance that breaks down blood clots, even if applied externally. Thus, you gotta keep this one away from the pregnant ladies as well.


4. Cinnamonium cassia, aka Cinnamon twigs... usually sold as Kuei Pi Chih
This is just good ol' cinnamon-- same as the spice. The only difference is that instead of just using the bark, here we'll be using the entire twig. Sometimes these twigs will be cut into sections, as in the photo... but other times you'll get actual little twigs.

You cannot substitute grocery store cinnamon for this ingredient, as some of the active ingredients of this herb are found in the bark, while other principals are in its heartwood.

The function of this stuff is to bring localized warmth to the area under treatment, to reduce swelling, and to improve electrolytic functioning in the localized nervous system adjacent to the wound.


5. Commiforma malmal, aka Myrrh... usually sold as Mo Yao
Yes, this stuff contains both Frankincense and Myrrh. Add a small bag of gold dust to the brew, and they'd call you a Magi.

As you can see, however, the stuff looks more or less like little blobs of cat shit. When you heat it up, it becomes gooey and like Frankincense, it smells absolutely divine. I should add here that I have never seen a bruise liniment (or any other preparation) that contained one ingredient without also the other. That is, they are almost always found together when used for medical purposes, whether the preparation is to be taken internally or externally.

The Myrrh's purpose in this mixture is identical to that of both Safflower and Frankincense, above; i.e., it breaks down blood clots, even via absorption through the skin. Thus, the warnings about pregnant women are in effect here, as well as warnings not to use this shit if you're on blood thinners such as Warfarin because it will act to make the blood too thin for Ahealth of the user.

The history of Myrrh in Chinese herbal medicine is identical to that of Frankincense; the two together arrived in China at the same period of time and for the same reason: the Mongols, under Hulagu Khan (the grandson of Genghis) went to the Middle East, put an ass-kicking on the Abbisid Caliphate that was ruling that area until the Mongols showed up, and discovered the value and usefulness of Myrrh-- thence spreading the substance to all parts of the Mongol Empire.


6. Gynura pinnatafida, aka Pseudo-Ginseng... usually sold as Tien Chi
This grayish stuff at about the 2:00 position looks a lot like Ginseng-- hence it's popular name. Like Ginseng, it's a "tonic herb", meaning that it's good for homeostasis in all the systems and subsystems of the human anatomy, as well as being useful for things such as our liniment, where it acts primarily as an anti-inflammatory.

As a tonic herb, it is *not* superior to Ginseng. However, as a "medicinal herb" (especially in internal medicine), it has more uses than Ginseng. Besides use in osteopathic liniments, it's also used to treat epistaxis, bleeding ulcers, hepatitis, liver problems, intestinal cancer, and a few other very serious ailments. That's why this herb is often found as the most expensive ingredient in our witches' brew.


7. Paeonia albiflora, aka White Peony... usually sold as Pai Shao
Another Asian import, both the red and white version of this herb do the same thing, which is tonify blood, establish a higher pain threshold, and to reduce muscle cramps and swelling.

It's the stuff that looks kind of like short tongue depressors at the 3:00 position in the photo.


8. Glycyrrhiza uralensis, aka Chinese Licorice... usually sold as Kan Tsao
This a the yellow-colored, twiggy-looking shit at the 4:00 position in the photo.

There is literally so much to say about this particular herb that I'm going to say almost nothing about it. Seriously: if we wanted to get down to it with this one, I'd have to write about half a book on acupuncture, another half a book on qigong, and then I could finally start talking about how to actually use the shit.

What a pita! So, instead of all that I will say here only that this is one of the most important of the "50 Essential Herbs of Chinese Medicine" and it's capable of some mind-blowing shit. However, in this formula of ours, the herb is mainly in there to act as a sort of catalyst that both buffers the other herbs, and also encourages the active ingredients to co-mingle- to literally combine chemically to produce third compounds that aren't found in any of the other herbs at all.

In the very quaint, super old-school parlance of the Chinese apothecary, it is said that Licorice is a match-maker in that it "causes the other herbs to marry and have children".

God, how I wish I could talk more about this one. It's some crazy, crazy shit. But if I told you, you wouldn't believe me... and for knowing better, I wouldn't care. :p


9. Rehmannia glutinosa, aka Rehmannia... usually sold as Shen Di Huang
This is the stuff that looks like a blackish-brown patch of tar at about the 5:30 position in the photo. The herb is sold in two forms: raw and another type that is steamed in vinegar. You want the raw form-- the black, ugly root. :p

This is yet another tonic herb-- in this case, however, it's especially good for the health of the blood. It removes toxins from the blood. It does this more readily when taken internally, but we'd save that use for treatment of internal injuries. The herb is powerful enough to deal with superficial bruising as a topical application.

Because this stuff likes to dissolve blood clots, you keep it away from people who take Warfarin and of course, women who are pregnant.


10. Nelumbo nucifera, aka Lotus Root... usually sold as Lien Tzu
Lotus Root is actually a foodstuff in a great many parts of East Asia and Southeast Asia, though it is the seeds that are eaten and not the roots. The roots are, obviously, used as a medicinal herb and its purpose is to promote rebuilding of damaged capillaries and veins, as well as to reduce pain and swelling. Taken internally, it also stymies internal bleeding while offsetting the more harsh synthetic pharmaceuticals that may also be in to staunch internal bleeding.

There's a ton of folklore and quite a few spiritual beliefs associated with this plant... to the point that I have even seen it referred to as the "holy lotus plant" in secular publications that weren't even discussing the medicinal use of the species.

And of course, I'd love to go on about this unto prolix, but then I'd have to ban myself for religioTaus posting. :facepalm:


11. Angelica sinensis, aka Angelica or Dong Qai.... usually sold as Dong Qai
After Ginseng, this is probably the most widely-abused Chinese herb out there. It's a superior tonic, but what makes it very attractive to Asian consumers is that it is a more effective sort of tonic herb for females than Ginseng is. This is why it's sometimes called "female ginseng".

This stuff comes in two forms: as a small radix that's about as hard as a rock, but also as a much larger radix that is considerably softer. This is the stuff in the center of the photo that looks like a squashed jellyfish or a flattened mushroom or something. In our formula, either type may be used to nourish the blood and to dissolve clots. Thus, this is the 5th of our ingredients that you do NOT give to pregnant women or even expose them to.

This might seem a bit ironic, after I informed you that this same stuff is also noted as "ginseng for women". The disparity here is only that while this is a good tonic for women who are not pregnant, it's not good for ladies who are with child. However, it's not as powerful as Safflower, Myrrh, Frankincense, or Rehmannia. This gives a woman who has become aware that she's pregnant a safe "window of time" within which to stop taking the stuff for the sake of her child.


***************
Okay-- so there are our ingredients, and as we've seen the majority are found only in Asia, while a couple are from the Middle East and one or two might be found elsewhere on this earth.

Some have been "tonic" herbs-- meaning that they may be taken as a preventative measure against various diseases and for the sake of physical maintenance in general-- while other herbs are "medicinal" in the sense that you only use them for very specific purposes. From this one might also conclude that while all tonic herbs are medicinal, not all medicinal herbs are tonics.

***************
I do realize that this is a lot to digest in one fell swoop, but to do justice to you-- and to the topic itself-- it was necessarily gonna be a slightly lengthy production.

And to think: I haven't even gotten around to telling you how to prepare the herbs, how to put all this shit together once you've got that sorted, and how to really get it going.

:facepalm:

But anyway: I'm a little tired now and figure to leave this for you to chew on until I come back to it tomorrow. That is, my next post in this thread will be to discuss how to prepare it, how to put it all together, how to store it, and finally, how to actually USE it.

And then I'll go away! :rofl:

This next post won't be such a bear as this opener has been. But again: I figured that if you were going to do this shit for real, then I should give you the requisite information so that you at least knew what you were handling, there. There are safety concerns and such that you should be aware of. It would be irresponsible of me to address this topic without plopping a bunch of info on the table for your consideration.

But the next post is gonna be a lot easier for you to read-- and for me to write. :p

I'll be back! :squint:

:laugh2:


--R :thumb:
Ohhhh, this is gonna be epic.

I've already purchased a 40 lb sack of dried corn, and am contemplating how best to pour a hip high concrete pedestal in my cellar.
 

BlankinLoud

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Cinder blocks will get it for at least the first 100 days. ;)

--R :thumb:

Perhaps.

Cinder blocks were my first thought, laid sideways with 2x6's down the voids.

Not sure how that would hold up long term because the force might go down through the wood and blast out sideways at the base. :hmm:
 

Roberteaux

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Cliff notes please.






:lol:

Can't dumb this one down, bud. Almost every little bit of what I said up there needed to be there.

You see, the subject involves the medicinal use of herbs, some of which have properties that would be deleterious or harmful to a given user under various circumstances-- all of which I pointed out up there. This is a topic that calls for a degree of ethical responsibility in presentation.

It wasn't just me bloviating. I'm seriously warning folks here, because that's the right thing to do.

This is real shit that can do real things to real people. And if you fuck it up? You can really hurt somebody or really get hurt yourself.

So, I wrote what had to be written. And the warnings I posted? They're no joke. You can really fuck yourself or somebody else up, if you don't know what you're doing. No foolies.

I also wished for BL to be able to research behind what I'm writing. This is a habit of his: I say something, he looks for more info. Sometimes he comes back with new questions and such. So, I wanted to leave the brother with at least one million solid clues as to what else he can look at. He has a very serious purpose in mind; he deserves the best I've got.

Every single plant I mentioned will be found on multiple sites-- some of them legitimate research sites, such as those affiliated with various medical research clinics (such as the Mayo Clinic). Every bit of what I spoke of is taught in the official medical establishments of the People's Republic of China, as traditional medicine is integrated with "Western" medicine in that nation.

Wikipedia is very worth looking at. Find the "50 Essential Chinese Herbs" article, and you'll find yourself in one hell of a deep rabbit hole if ever there was one. You can study this shit for your entire life and never cease to learn-- never learn it all.

Because of all this, it is most necessary for me to inform all readers that this website cannot be held responsible for any misuse of the information presented above, and good luck suing me.

I'm warning all readers one last time: you fuck with this shit, it's on you. I don't need a license merely to speak of the subject, and whoever wants to play with this shit is solely responsible for whatever happens as a consequence.

--R :thumb:
 

Roberteaux

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Perhaps.

Cinder blocks were my first thought, laid sideways with 2x6's down the voids.

Not sure how that would hold up long term because the force might go down through the wood and blast out sideways at the base. :hmm:

OMG, dude... you're not going to be using any follow-through force for quite a while-- and almost never while in training for the first 100 days.

You've got to change a bit of thinking. You're thinking too much of brute force, whereas there won't be a whole lot of that going on for several months. And at that point, you won't be using downward motion in conditioning quite as much as you'll be striking bags that are suspended from above. That's what we might think of as "Phase Two" of the process.

Ooooh, you're gonna HATE this! I love it! :laugh2:

You have to get that "empty striking" thing dialed in-- no muscular tension when your hand makes contact with the bag, no further muscular effort other than what was needed to launch... so, it even taxes one's patience at first.

Again, you launch really hard and strike swiftly from overhead, yes... but you must abandon the muscular effort completely the very instant before your hand whacks into that bag... get it?

Whoo, it sure does hurts like hell for a quite a while there. Stings mostly. Son of a bitch, it also bruises the shit out of your hands... and you're not EVEN using the kind of force you're envisioning here...

...which actually kind of makes it hurt even worse! You don't even get to tense up to buffer the pain! :laugh2:

***************​

Then comes your third and final phase. But we won't discuss that at all until we get to where it's time to go there.

However: I do hope for you to continue to perform all types of research beyond merely what I am telling you. Best to think of me as the Moose Out Front who will tell you where to find what in this crazy-ass shit you're interested in. I'm also here to answer questions and help in any other way possible.

Dude, this is gonna be fun! We're on!

--R :applause:
 
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BlankinLoud

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OMG, dude... you're not going to be using any follow-through force for quite a while-- and almost never while in training for the first 100 days.

You've got to change a bit of thinking. You're thinking too much of brute force, whereas there won't be a whole lot of that going on for several months. And at that point, you won't be using downward motion in conditioning quite as much as you'll be striking bags that are suspended from above. That's what we might think of as "Phase Two" of the process.

Ooooh, you're gonna HATE this! I love it! :laugh2:

You have to get that "empty striking" thing dialed in-- no muscular tension when your hand makes contact with the bag, no further muscular effort other than what was needed to launch... so, it even taxes one's patience at first.

Again, you launch really hard and strike swiftly from overhead, yes... but you must abandon the muscular effort completely the very instant before your hand whacks into that bag... get it?

Whoo, it sure does hurts like hell for a quite a while there. Stings mostly. Son of a bitch, it also bruises the shit out of your hands... and you're not EVEN using the kind of force you're envisioning here...

...which actually kind of makes it hurt worse!

***************​

Then comes your third and final phase. But we won't discuss that at all until we get to where it's time to go there.

However: I do hope for you to continue to perform all types of research beyond merely what I am telling you. Best to think of me as the Moose Out Front who will tell you where to find what in this crazy-ass shit you're interested in. I'm also here to answer questions and help in any other way possible.

Dude, this is gonna be fun! We're on!

--R :applause:
In regards to the pedestal I was thinking of what I can do now if I *really* want to in my "9 months past my expiration date" condition and extrapolating from there. Glad to see I can scale back to a reasonable bill of materials.
 

BlankinLoud

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OMG, dude... you're not going to be using any follow-through force for quite a while-- and almost never while in training for the first 100 days.

You've got to change a bit of thinking. You're thinking too much of brute force, whereas there won't be a whole lot of that going on for several months. And at that point, you won't be using downward motion in conditioning quite as much as you'll be striking bags that are suspended from above. That's what we might think of as "Phase Two" of the process.

Ooooh, you're gonna HATE this! I love it! :laugh2:

You have to get that "empty striking" thing dialed in-- no muscular tension when your hand makes contact with the bag, no further muscular effort other than what was needed to launch... so, it even taxes one's patience at first.

Again, you launch really hard and strike swiftly from overhead, yes... but you must abandon the muscular effort completely the very instant before your hand whacks into that bag... get it?

Whoo, it sure does hurts like hell for a quite a while there. Stings mostly. Son of a bitch, it also bruises the shit out of your hands... and you're not EVEN using the kind of force you're envisioning here...

...which actually kind of makes it hurt even worse! You don't even get to tense up to buffer the pain! :laugh2:

***************​

Then comes your third and final phase. But we won't discuss that at all until we get to where it's time to go there.

However: I do hope for you to continue to perform all types of research beyond merely what I am telling you. Best to think of me as the Moose Out Front who will tell you where to find what in this crazy-ass shit you're interested in. I'm also here to answer questions and help in any other way possible.

Dude, this is gonna be fun! We're on!

--R :applause:
The "No muscular tension" is gonna be a bugbear initially, but I'll get through it. Kinda like launching a white tiger strike from a hip impulse but not the same.:hmm:
 

Roberteaux

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Is that like Zheng Gu Shui?

Well... they're both in the same category: both are topical preparations that are used to treat more superficial osteopathic injuries, ailments, and related disorders.

But Zheng Gu Shui is different in a few senses... for instance, it arrives as a cream instead of a liquid solution, the most active ingredient in the preparation looks to be camphor... and also, this is what we'd call a Chinese "patent" medicine. That is: the prep, the name, and so forth are all patented products, and it's not (necessarily) mostly just raw herbs.

Sometimes when I get to talking about "patent medicine", people think I am dissing the medication at hand. Nothing could be further than the truth, however, as some of the patent medicines out there work like a champ and aren't such a fuss to use as this liquid shit I wrote of above.

For approximately three years, I was lucky enough to study under a Singaporean dude who had a better grip on this subject than I do. He was in the states to attend college, and just by happenstance I came upon him and got the guy to teach me a lot of things.

He had a weird, outlier liniment that was based in wintergreen oil... it was a rather pungent solution, fairly icky and unpleasant to use... but it worked very well and would still be a preferred solution in my case... except that I dislike its oily texture and consistency, the powerful scent of it... and in purely herbal terms, the stuff is too "hot" for me to favor it.

But it does work! :thumb:

***************
So, that's some shit. But here's another ha-ha for those susceptible to really stoopid humor:

One time I got gut-sick as hell and was barfing about it. My instructor became aware of it when I called to inform him that I wouldn't be available for the usual Wednesday night ass kicking he handed me as one form of "instruction".

He was concerned enough to drive to my house, and brought a small container of an herbal preparation made up of a mixture of raw herbs. This stuff had an ornate mandala on the lid of the container. I was informed that this was a patent medicine he brought with him from Singapore.

One small spoonful of whatever that shit was, and 15 minutes later my gut was settled. An hour later it was as if I hadn't spent much of the night and the following morning on my knees, praying at the white porcelain throne of the god of shit, piss, and puke.

Those three years sped by like a fence post when viewed from the cockpit of a racing Corvette. God, how I miss Lai Yin-- the evil bastard that he was... :laugh2:

A year after he returned to Singapore, he rang me up to see how I was doing. I remembered the patent medicine he gave me and asked him what it was called. I had searched for this stuff in the apothecary shops of Little Vietnam (part of Orlando), and came up with nothing. I couldn't even remember what it was called.

His reply was that he wasn't sure if the stuff was exported to the US. Then he told me that I was a dope for not remembering that he told me the shit came from India. I retorted that he'd told me he brought it from Singapore.

He said I was an idiot again, stated that he had for sure told me of its Indian origin, and reminded me that he said he "brought it" from Singapore. Not that it was actually *made* there.

"The mandala on the lid should have given you a clue, nitwit," he said with a laugh. "You see that shit, and it's almost certainly something from either Tibet or India. And with the CCP running the show in Tibet, it's very likely to be from India and not Tibet."

"How the hell would I know that?" I asked him. "When I look at places such as Singapore and Thailand, I see what appears to have been a cultural train wreck between India and China anyway!"

He was laughing his head off as he jeered, "You're just smart enough to be extremely dangerous, did you know that? Dammit, the shit is from India and I certainly did tell you that!"

He chuckled again, then said, "A cultural train wreck, huh? You want to see a real train wreck, just go take a look in the nearest mirror and your 'train wreck' will be right there, gazing back at you!" :laugh2:

So that was one of my cruel mentors-- Lai Yin. He was also my most favorite teacher, of the many I've had over the years... :)

He once told me that the only thing he enjoyed more than dumping me on my ass was to insult me verbally. :rofl:

Despite all that, I really DO miss the bastard! :laugh2:

--R :thumb:
 
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James R

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Many years ago-- so long ago that the Mad Hatter thread was still named OneHippie-- I made a promise to a fellow member in the aforementioned thread.

The member was my buddy, @BlankinLoud , and the promise I made to him was to provide him with a recipe for a very powerful bruise liniment that was compounded by a specialist in Chinese herbal medicine, which was thence transmitted to me.

The medicinal substance involved is a decoction, in liquid form. It's very simple to make, really: one simply adds 10 - 12 different herbs commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine to a mixture of ethyl alcohol and clean water. Following this, one stores the mixture in a cool-ish (but not cold) dark place, usually in a dark glass bottle or opaque ceramic container. Every few days one agitates the mixture slightly to ensure that the liquid portion of the formula circulates. The reason we use alcohol and water together is because the active ingredients in some of these herbs are soluble in alcohol, while others are soluble in water.

We age the stuff for at least 60 days before it's ready to be used, even though the liniment actually continues to grow in strength and effectiveness up to about three years. At that point, the stuff stabilizes-- and though it doesn't get any stronger it doesn't get weaker either, so long as it has been handled properly all along.

I was taught this, along with the formula itself, but since I first began compounding these liniments back in 1984, I have had the opportunity to observe at first hand that what I was taught and mentioned above is true: this particular formula doesn't get stronger (or weaker) after three years.

Others may, but if they do I have never compounded or used them myself-- even though over the last four decades I experimented with several formulas I was able to acquire by one means or another and it was all pretty much the same.

Another curious aspect to the various Chinese herbal-medicinal compounds, liniments, and what-have-you that I have made and experimented with over the years was this: that with the exception of but three outliers, every formula (a dozen or so, I believe) had far more in common with yet other remedies than differences in content. I found this to be very, very interesting because my informants came from such far-flung places as Guangdong Province, China to Singapore to West Germany and back to Orlando.

Weirdly, however, it's also the fact that this stuff I'm teaching the reader to make in this thread came to me by way of a specialist in Chinese herbal medicine who is not only not an ethnic Chinese person, but he's even a weird-looking red-haired white boy who lives in Trenton, New Jersey.

He's never been to China in his entire life, but he *was* able to study as an apprentice under yet another practitioner (also known to me) of herbal medicine who once vended raw herbs, various herbal compounds, and various Asian "patent medicines" out of a shop on Canal Street in NYC. He was born and raised in China, and was trained in traditional Chinese medicine before he arrived in NYC. Sadly, he passed away many years ago, but he sure did teach his red-haired student very well.

In fact, the liniment prescription I will present in this thread is the student's invention-- specifically his-- and that was the first (and last) time I ever actually knew the actual guy who came up with a given recipe. In all other cases, the identity of the person who originally formulated a given type was unknown-- even to the person who gave me the formula. Most of these decoctions could be proven to have existed for centuries befor my tired old ass was even born.

But, when it comes to how effective this New Jersey Brew happens to be... well, I'd say that as what I'd call a "Type 1" formula, it's the best of the best that I am personally aware of.

***************​

So, how good is that? The truth is that if you manage to get whacked, or to fall, or whatever, and now you are puffy and swelling up and red-- soon to be black-and-blue-- if you apply this liniment to the injured area immediately and apply the liniment about three or four times per day, the chances are good-to-excellent that you won't end up with that purplish bruise at all, period.

If you've already got a purplish bruise going, this shit will make it go away in about two or three days instead of the week or two weeks it usually takes to vanish completely.

That's how good it is after sixty days of aging. After three years, it's strong enough that you use a much smaller amount of the liniment to achieve the same end result.

***************​

For a laugh:

I was getting ready to make a new batch of my favorite Type 1 liniment (I ended up making just two liniments after studying several), when somehow I flashed onto having discussed this bruise liniment in a OneHippie post I made... like, I dunno... had to be at least six years ago... and BL expressed an interest in learning how to make this shit.

I solemnly promised to provide said instruction, but of course promptly forgot having done so. For his own part, BL maybe didn't want to bug me about it or something, but he sure as hell didn't forget.

You see: a couple of weeks ago I got pretty low-- this was a batch I made about four years ago-- and so I set about to purchasing fresh herbs to create a fresh batch of liniment... perhaps for the last time, as I'm no longer quite so physically active or in need of this sort of preparation as I used to be. Plus, I made a lot of it this time around-- possibly a full supply of whatever is left of my life.

While tracking down fresh herbs sold by the ounce, I suddenly remembered my promise to BlankinLoud-- a long-term friend of mine whom I have a great deal of respect for... most especially when it comes to his tolerance of me and various of my peculiarities as a being. That poor guy has put up with SO much shit from me over the years, that I'd go straight to hell if I didn't at least come across with this promise I made to him over half a decade ago... :laugh2:

But here's the funny part: I started sending PM's to the guy, to tell him that I was finally going to fulfill a promise I made to him. As I hoped, the guy said that he forgot me ever making some promise to him.

So I sent him two clues... and they were both so vague and nebulous that I cackled wickedly to myself as I considered odds of him ever remembering any of it. These clues were deliberately contrived to be misleading, even... but don't you know: about twenty seconds after I sent them, BlankinLoud wrote back with his correct guess as to what I was alluding to! :shock: :shock: :shock:

That guy? He's worse than me, man-- he don't forget nothin'! :eek2:

Scary dude, man! If you ever really piss the guy off, don't come running to me about the horrible payback he laid on you about seven years later! :rofl:

***************
Okay, with no further fanfare, this is what we've got-- these are our raw herbs:


Okay, I figure that I should start with the easily identified red-colored stuff in about the 8:00 position on the plate in the photo... after that, I will proceed clockwise, ending with the yellow-white shit that looks like somebody ran over a mushroom in the center of the plate.

I will first identify each herb by its Latin name as used by Western botanists, followed by some of the common names (if there are any), but will end with a phonetic version of its Chinese name, as it is most likely to be listed by those who vend this stuff as "Chinese herbs".

As it happens, some of these herbs aren't strictly Chinese and instead grow in several parts of the world. Several of these medicinal herbs will be found in various herbal remedies of a strictly Western tradition-- though almost always used in a way that is strikingly similar to the purposes of Chinese traditional medicine.

So, starting with the red shit, here we go!

1. Carthamus tinctoris, aka "Safflower"... usually sold as Hung Hua
This red stuff is a very powerful herb that tends to increase localized blood flow and to prevent excessive clotting that ends up being the black-and-blue bruise... it's really just a big blood clot, visible under the surface of the skin. However, heed this warning: if Hung Hua is taken by pregnant women-- even if only absorbed through the skin-- the active principles of this herb might actually cause miscarriage because it will attack an early embryo as though it were a blood clot, thus aborting the development of the fetus.

The Chinese have been using this shit as a substance to provoke an abortion, literally for centuries. Of course, Hung Hua is not the *only* herb to be found in the infusion that was developed to abort a developing fetus, but it's probably the strongest herb one would find in such an infusion-- and it's one of the strongest herbs in this formula as well.

I'm not kidding about this: you absolutely MUST keep Hung Hua the hell away from pregnant women, most especially in the earliest stages of pregnancy. Likewise, do not use "Red Flower Oil" as a tea for colds and flu if the patient is a pregnant woman.

I'm being serious as a heart attack here, people: keep the shit away from pregnant women!


2. Scutellaria baicalensis, aka Skullcap Root... usually sold as Huang Sun
This is the yellow stuff at the 9:00 position in the photo. There are over 100 types of "skullcap" growing on the earth, but Huang Sun grows only at the farthest east end of the Eurasian continent, especially in Russia, China, Mongolia, and Korea. Its purpose in this formula is that it is an anti-inflammatory agent that reduces swelling. In Chinese internal medicine, however, this stuff has been used to treat a great many disorders, from diabetes and dysentary to ulcerative colitis.

Do not expose people to this shit if they're taking warfarin or any other blood thinner. It's also good to avoid this herb if one taking statins, as one of its active ingredients (norwogonin) has appeared to interfere with uptake of statins in human test subjects.


3. Boswellia glabra, aka Frankincense... usually sold as Ru Hsiang
This is what the little whitish-yellow "pebbles" at the 10:00 position in the photo are: little chunks of Frankincense. The substance is made up of the dried, resinous extrusion of a plant that grows in the Middle East and has been used as a medicine in that region for at least 2,500 years.

It's kind of a newcomer to Chinese herbal medicine, though, having only been introduced to China by the Mongols during the reign of Genghis Khan... meaning that the Johnny-come-lately substance has only been in use in China for a little under 1,100 years.

This is still long enough for the Chinese to have found what it's really good for: it's another substance that breaks down blood clots, even if applied externally. Thus, you gotta keep this one away from the pregnant ladies as well.


4. Cinnamonium cassia, aka Cinnamon twigs... usually sold as Kuei Pi Chih
This is just good ol' cinnamon-- same as the spice. The only difference is that instead of just using the bark, here we'll be using the entire twig. Sometimes these twigs will be cut into sections, as in the photo... but other times you'll get actual little twigs.

You cannot substitute grocery store cinnamon for this ingredient, as some of the active ingredients of this herb are found in the bark, while other principals are in its heartwood.

The function of this stuff is to bring localized warmth to the area under treatment, to reduce swelling, and to improve electrolytic functioning in the localized nervous system adjacent to the wound.


5. Commiforma malmal, aka Myrrh... usually sold as Mo Yao
Yes, this stuff contains both Frankincense and Myrrh. Add a small bag of gold dust to the brew, and they'd call you a Magi.

As you can see, however, the stuff looks more or less like little blobs of cat shit. When you heat it up, it becomes gooey and like Frankincense, it smells absolutely divine. I should add here that I have never seen a bruise liniment (or any other preparation) that contained one ingredient without also the other. That is, they are almost always found together when used for medical purposes, whether the preparation is to be taken internally or externally.

The Myrrh's purpose in this mixture is identical to that of both Safflower and Frankincense, above; i.e., it breaks down blood clots, even via absorption through the skin. Thus, the warnings about pregnant women are in effect here, as well as warnings not to use this shit if you're on blood thinners such as Warfarin because it will act to make the blood too thin for the health of the user.

The history of Myrrh in Chinese herbal medicine is identical to that of Frankincense; the two together arrived in China at the same period of time and for the same reason: the Mongols, under Hulagu Khan (the grandson of Genghis) went to the Middle East, put an ass-kicking on the Abbisid Caliphate that was ruling that area until the Mongols showed up, and discovered the value and usefulness of Myrrh-- thence spreading the substance to all parts of the Mongol Empire.


6. Gynura pinnatafida, aka Pseudo-Ginseng... usually sold as Tien Chi
This grayish stuff at about the 2:00 position looks a lot like Ginseng-- hence its popular name. Like Ginseng, it's a "tonic herb", meaning that it's good for homeostasis in all the systems and subsystems of the human anatomy, as well as being useful for things such as our liniment, where it acts primarily as an anti-inflammatory.

As a tonic herb, it is *not* superior to Ginseng. However, as a "medicinal herb" (especially in internal medicine), it has more uses than Ginseng. Besides use in osteopathic liniments, it's also used to treat epistaxis, bleeding ulcers, hepatitis, liver problems, intestinal cancer, and a few other very serious ailments. That's why this herb is often found as the most expensive ingredient in our witches' brew.


7. Paeonia albiflora, aka White Peony... usually sold as Pai Shao
Another Asian import, both the red and white version of this herb do the same thing, which is tonify blood, establish a higher pain threshold, and to reduce muscle cramps and swelling.

It's the stuff that looks kind of like short tongue depressors at the 3:00 position in the photo.


8. Glycyrrhiza uralensis, aka Chinese Licorice... usually sold as Kan Tsao
This a the yellow-colored, twiggy-looking shit at the 4:00 position in the photo.

There is literally so much to say about this particular herb that I'm going to say almost nothing about it. Seriously: if we wanted to get down to it with this one, I'd have to write about half a book on acupuncture, another half a book on qigong, and then I could finally start talking about how to actually use the shit.

What a pita! So, instead of all that I will say here only that this is one of the most important of the "50 Essential Herbs of Chinese Medicine" and it's capable of some mind-blowing shit. However, in this formula of ours, the herb is mainly in there to act as a sort of catalyst that both buffers the other herbs, and also encourages the active ingredients to co-mingle- to literally combine chemically to produce third compounds that aren't found in any of the other herbs at all.

In the very quaint, super old-school parlance of the Chinese apothecary, it is said that Licorice is a match-maker in that it "causes the other herbs to marry and have children".

God, how I wish I could talk more about this one. It's some crazy, crazy shit. But if I told you, you wouldn't believe me... and for knowing better, I wouldn't care. :p


9. Rehmannia glutinosa, aka Rehmannia... usually sold as Shen Di Huang
This is the stuff that looks like a blackish-brown patch of tar at about the 5:30 position in the photo. The herb is sold in two forms: raw and another type that is steamed in vinegar. You want the raw form-- the black, ugly root. :p

This is yet another tonic herb-- in this case, however, it's especially good for the health of the blood. It removes toxins from the blood. It does this more readily when taken internally, but we'd save that use for treatment of internal injuries. The herb is powerful enough to deal with superficial bruising as a topical application.

Because this stuff likes to dissolve blood clots, you keep it away from people who take Warfarin and of course, women who are pregnant.


10. Nelumbo nucifera, aka Lotus Root... usually sold as Lien Tzu
Lotus Root is actually a foodstuff in a great many parts of East Asia and Southeast Asia, though it is the seeds that are eaten and not the roots. The roots are, obviously, used as a medicinal herb and its purpose is to promote rebuilding of damaged capillaries and veins, as well as to reduce pain and swelling. Taken internally, it also stymies internal bleeding while offsetting the more harsh synthetic pharmaceuticals that may also be in to staunch internal bleeding.

There's a ton of folklore and quite a few spiritual beliefs associated with this plant... to the point that I have even seen it referred to as the "holy lotus plant" in secular publications that weren't even discussing the medicinal use of the species.

And of course, I'd love to go on about this unto prolix, but then I'd have to ban myself for religious posting. :facepalm:


11. Angelica sinensis, aka Angelica or Dong Qai.... usually sold as Dong Qai
After Ginseng, this is probably the most widely-abused Chinese herb out there. It's a superior tonic, but what makes it very attractive to Asian consumers is that it is a more effective sort of tonic herb for females than Ginseng is. This is why it's sometimes called "female ginseng".

This stuff comes in two forms: as a small radix that's about as hard as a rock, but also as a much larger radix that is considerably softer. This is the stuff in the center of the photo that looks like a squashed jellyfish or a flattened mushroom or something. In our formula, either type may be used to nourish the blood and to dissolve clots. Thus, this is the 5th of our ingredients that you do NOT give to pregnant women or even expose them to.

This might seem a bit ironic, after I informed you that this same stuff is also noted as "ginseng for women". The disparity here is only that while this is a good tonic for women who are not pregnant, it's not good for ladies who are with child. However, it's not as powerful as Safflower, Myrrh, Frankincense, or Rehmannia. This gives a woman who has become aware that she's pregnant a safe "window of time" within which to stop taking the stuff for the sake of her child.


***************
Okay-- so there are our ingredients, and as we've seen the majority are found only in Asia, while a couple are from the Middle East and one or two might be found elsewhere on this earth.

Some have been "tonic" herbs-- meaning that they may be taken as a preventative measure against various diseases and for the sake of physical maintenance in general-- while other herbs are "medicinal" in the sense that you only use them for very specific purposes. From this one might also conclude that while all tonic herbs are medicinal, not all medicinal herbs are tonics.

***************
I do realize that this is a lot to digest in one fell swoop, but to do justice to you-- and to the topic itself-- it was necessarily gonna be a slightly lengthy production.

And to think: I haven't even gotten around to telling you how to prepare the herbs, how to put all this shit together once you've got that sorted, and how to really get it going.

:facepalm:

But anyway: I'm a little tired now and figure to leave this for you to chew on until I come back to it tomorrow. That is, my next post in this thread will be to discuss how to prepare it, how to put it all together, how to store it, and finally, how to actually USE it.

And then I'll go away! :rofl:

This next post won't be such a bear as this opener has been. But again: I figured that if you were going to do this shit for real, then I should give you the requisite information so that you at least knew what you were handling, there. There are safety concerns and such that you should be aware of. It would be irresponsible of me to address this topic without plopping a bunch of info on the table for your consideration.

But the next post is gonna be a lot easier for you to read-- and for me to write. :p

I'll be back! :squint:

:laugh2:


--R :thumb:
This is great, Rob, thanks for posting!

I enjoy making tinctures, tropicals, ointments, etc.
I usuallyuse one main medicinal ingredient along with a few essential oils, depending on the purpose, but I think I'm going to attempt to source these ingredients and try it out.

I wonder if I could add some of my favorite medicinal ingredient to the recipe.
Any idea why that would or could present an issue at all?
 

spoony

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Roberteaux, thanks for sharing this and passing along some wisdom.

My favorite liniment is mainly comprised of comfrey.

s
 

Roberteaux

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This is great, Rob, thanks for posting! th

I enjoy making tinctures, tropicals, ointments, etc.
I usuallyuse one main medicinal ingredient along with a few essential oils, depending on the purpose, but I think I'm going to attempt to source these ingredients and try it out.

I wonder if I could add some of my favorite medicinal ingredient to the recipe.
Any idea why that would or could present an issue at all?

Not surprised that you're into medico-herbal pursuits at all, brother. Over the years I've noticed that we have a lot more than just that in common, though. :thumb:

New formulations are constantly being experimented with, and other formulas are tinkered with by various individuals. For instance, in the recipe I posted as OP, the original prescription involved 12 herbs, not 11.

What happened there was that I realized that the 12th herb wasn't quite necessary. Speaking to the progenitor of the type, I asked him if we couldn't eliminate that last herb, Ligusticum lucidum, as it appeared to be a bit of overkill.

I found out then what the reason that this shit-- which is commonly called "River Parsley"-- was in there for happened to be... and it had more to do with numerology than medicine! :shock:

So later, I was motivated to dispense with the stuff. It never did make any difference one way or the other.

My advice to you is this:

Pick up a copy of Ron Teeguarden's book, "Chinese Tonic Herbs"

cth.jpg


This is an excellent place to start because one will find the "tonic" herbs (as I spoke of previously) in virtually all traditional preparations.

An awareness of how these herbs work is explained to a sufficient degree, though it's weird as shit to find that actually, the entire basis of traditional Chinese herbal medicine comes to us from a form of Chinese alchemy that probably pre-dates the Bronze Age in that part of the world. This would be the Chinese "5 Element Theory".

5el.jpg


There's your basis for studying herbal meds a la Chinese, right there. Obviously, I'm not about to go into it.

LOL I wasn't kidding when I said you could study this shit for your entire life and never cease to make new realizations. The topic itself is very, very deep... and extremely broad in scope.

But the author does a good job of simplifying that particular subject, and one is at once introduced to the tonic herbs used in Chinese herbal medicine while also getting some insight as to what the nature of a given herb (whether tonic or medicinal) happens to be... how it may be classified. And that gives you a very, very good idea of how to use it.

Really, this is mandatory reading for those who mean to go where I think you would like to go. I'm not an affiliate marketer-- Teeguarden doesn't sponsor me or even know me from Adam. But his book is truly excellent.

Another valuable reference that comes to us by a more peculiar source would be "The Barefoot Doctor's Manual". This tome of a book is an excellent reference for those who are interested in all three legs of the "tripod" of traditional Chinese medicine, which are qigong, herbal medicines, and acupuncture.

The book was written after Chairman Mao sent forth squads of doctors who were trained formally in both traditional Chinese medicine as well as in Western medicine because Mao was fully aware of the extremely high value of the systematic practice entailed within Chinese medicine in general.

He also wanted to rid the country of numerous fraudulent practitioners, because these guys know nothing and are just out to stick it to those who are less aware than they are of how the shit really works.

Consider Mr. Carpetbagger, from "The Outlaw Josie Wales"...

3584c-carpetbagger.tiff_.jpg

The man didn't even know what was in the bottle-- but there he was selling the shit anyway. :p

Well, at one point China was fairly crawling with mountebanks of his sort-- and worse. So, while compiling the book that came to be known as "The Barefoot Doctor's Manual", those same doctors were also having phonies arrested and sentenced to prison for being a false practitioner.

Consider this, James: the Chinese were performing various types of surgery that are relatively sophisticated in nature... but they were doing these thing many hundreds of years before some of their medical practices actually made it to Europe.

What sort of procedures? Things such as successful cesarean sections by about 1200 BC, appendectomies a few hundred years after that. By about 250 BC, Chinese dentists were performing successful root canals! :shock:

Mao knew all this, and he also understood the value of medical procedures (and medications) that did not originate in China... he seems to have understood that the ultimate package would be to integrate traditional practices with those procedures that the doctors felt were superior to some of the traditional methods of China and were instead developed elsewhere.

So, this book is way more advanced... but it is of almost incredible value as a resource for herbalists and etc. At one thousand pages in length, I'd say about three hundred are dedicated to the subject of herbal medicine, including drawings and other information of great value.

bf.jpg


The book will cost you at least ten times what Teeguarden's book costs... but it's worth it.

Best luck!

--R :thumb: :thumb: :thumb:
 
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Bigfoot410

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This all seems like a lot of work.

I have an easier recipe: It's a bruise. Suck it up, buttercup. :)
 

James R

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Not surprised that you're into medico-herbal pursuits at all, brother. Over the years I've noticed that we have a lot more than just that in common, though. :thumb:

New formulations are constantly being experimented with, and other formulas are tinkered with by various individuals. For instance, in the recipe I posted as OP, the original prescription involved 12 herbs, not 11.

What happened there was that I realized that the 12th herb wasn't quite necessary. Speaking to the progenitor of the type, I asked him if we couldn't eliminate that last herb, Ligusticum Lucidum, as it appeared to be a bit of overkill.

I found out then that the reason that this shit-- which is commonly called "River Parsley" was in there for... and it had more to do with numerology than medicine! :shock:

So later, I was motivated to dispense with the stuff. It never did make any difference one way or the other.

My advice to you is this:

Pick up a copy of Ron Teeguarden's book, "Chinese Tonic Herbs"

View attachment 620164

This is an excellent place to start because one will find the "tonic" herbs (as I spoke of previously) in virtually all traditional preparations.

An awareness of how these herbs work is explained to a sufficient degree, though it's weird as shit to find that actually, the entire basis of traditional Chinese herbal medicine comes to us from a form of Chinese alchemy that probably pre-dates the Bronze Age in that part of the world. This would be the Chinese "5 Element Theory".

View attachment 620174

There's your basis for studying herbal meds a la Chinese, right there. Obviously, I'm not about to go into it.

LOL I wasn't kidding when I said you could study this shit for your entire life and never cease to make new realizations. The topic itself is very, very deep... and extremely broad in scope.

But the author does a good job of simplifying that particular subject, and one is at once introduced to the tonic herbs used in Chinese herbal medicine while also getting some insight as to what the nature of a given herb (whether tonic or medicinal) happens to be... how it may be classified. And that gives you a very, very good idea of how to use it.

Really, this is mandatory reading for those who mean to go where I think you would like to go. I'm not an affiliate marketer-- Teeguarden doesn't sponsor me or even know me from Adam. But his book is truly excellent.

Another valuable reference that comes to us by a more peculiar source would be "The Barefoot Doctor's Manual". This tome of a book is an excellent reference for those who are interested in all three legs of the "tripod" of traditional Chinese medicine, which are qigong, herbal medicines, and acupuncture.

The book was written after Chairman Mao sent forth squads of doctors who were trained formally in both traditional Chinese medicine as well as in Western medicine because Mao was fully aware of the extremely high value of the systematic practice entailed within Chinese medicine in general.

He also wanted to rid the country of numerous fraudulent practitioners, because these guys know nothing and are just out to stick it to those who are less aware than they are of how the shit really works.

Consider Mr. Carpetbagger, from "The Outlaw Josie Wales"...

The man didn't even know what was in the bottle-- but there he was selling the shit anyway. :p

Well, at one point China was fairly crawling with mountebanks of his sort-- and worse. So, while compiling the book that came to be known as "The Barefoot Doctor's Manual", those same doctors were also having phonies arrested and sentenced to prison for being a false practitioner.

Consider this, James: the Chinese were performing various types of surgery that are relatively sophisticated in nature... but they were doing these thing many hundreds of years before some of their medical practices actually made it to Europe.

What sort of procedures? Things such as successful cesarean sections by about 1200 BC, appendectomies a few hundred years after that. By about 250 BC, Chinese dentists were performing successful root canals! :shock:

Mao knew all this, and he also understood the value of medical procedures (and medications) that did not originate in China... he seems to have understood that the ultimate package would be to integrate traditional practices with those procedures that the doctors felt were superior to some of the traditional methods of China and were instead developed elsewhere.

So, this book is way more advanced... but it is of almost incredible value as a resource for herbalists and etc. At one thousand pages in length, I'd say about three hundred are dedicated to the subject of herbal medicine, including drawings and other information of great value.

View attachment 620171

The book will cost you at least ten times what Teeguarden's book costs... but it's worth it.

Best luck!

--R :thumb: :thumb: :thumb:
Thanks so much, Rob, I really appreciate your time and knowledge with this post.

I'm off to find a copy of one, if not both of those books, and am stoked to jump down the rabbit hole!
 

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