7 Albums

rogue3

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I wanted to fit this thread into 5,but couldn't.

Your biggest influence.I realize people will pipe in with current influences...and retro memories,depending on age.Its's all cool,just go for it.
limit 7

because i'm an old guy...my seven:

Dark Side of The Moon
Who's Next
In Rock
Yesterdays
Led Zeppelin IV
Lynyrd Skynyrd
Black Sabbath

that's it.

ironically,my oldest daughter has re-discovered these albums.of course,it has nothing to do with me.
 
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Percy

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Elvis..Elvis
Led Zep 1

Grand Funk Rail Road
The Guess Who
Pink Floyd Wish You Were Here
Rush
Suzie Quatro
April Wine
Cars
Garth Brooks
Oops i went ten
 
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sLowBrian

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The Allman Brothers Band At Fillmore East
Eat A Peach
Leon Live
Mad Dogs and Englishmen
Thin Lizzy Live and Dangerous
Gov't Mule At Roseland Ballroom
Chuck Berry The London Sessions
 

Rds

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Led zeppelin
Ted nugent
Ted Nugent- double live gonzo
Black sabbath- paranoid
Ozzy osbourne- diary of a madman
Foghat- fool for the city
Jimi Hendrix- are you experienced

Many more than this.
 

EasyAce

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Only seven? Well, I'll try. In no order of preference . . .

Mike Bloomfield, Al Kooper, Steve Stills, Super Session
The Butterfield Blues Band, East-West
Miles Davis, In a Silent Way
Grant Green, Grant's First Stand
Howlin' Wolf, Moanin' at the Moonlight
Robert Johnson, King of the Delta Blues Singers
B.B. King, Completely Well
 

Leumas

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Man. This is always a rotating list for me, but at this point I’d have to go with

GnR - Appetite for Destruction
Carole King - Tapestry
Best of Stray Cats
The Refreshments - Fizzy, Fuzzy, Big and Buzzy
Beatles - Revolver
Ween - Quebec
Freddie King - Shelter Records Years
 

prs97

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Rush, A Show of Hands (first time I heard them. Not my favorite release but most nostalgic)
Gov't Mule, first album (tone to die for!)
SRV, In Step
The Who, Whos Next
ABB, 2nd Set (Warren and Dickey pair at their peak)
Mastodon, Crack The Skye (thank you MLP for turning me onto this)
Eric Clapton, Journeyman (was the latest release when I picked up playing guitar)
 

scrumm21

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Johnny Winter 'And Live
Live at Leeds
Leon Live
1st Black Sabbath
Who's Next
Love it To Death
Schools Out
 

MooCheng

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Fairport liege & lief
Richard Thompson mirror blue
Poco running horse
TVZ Delta momma blues
Highwaymen American outlaws
Tracy Chapman telling stories
Hefner greedy ugly people
 

Pappy58

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Duane Allman - Fillmore East
Warren Haynes - Any
Ed King - Second Helping
Jimi - At Monterey
Terry Kath - Chicago Transit Authority
SRV - Couldn't Stand the Weather
Eric Clapton - Derek and the Dominoes (Honorable Mention to Duane here)
 

mdubya

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Jimi Hendrix - Are You Experienced? Axis, Bold As Love, Electric Ladyland
Ron Asheton and James Williamson - The Stooges, Fun House, and Raw Power
Angus and Malcolm - Powerage, Dirty Deeds, and Highway to Hell
Eric Clapton - Beano, Fresh Cream, and Disraeli Gears
Jeff Beck - Truth, Beck-Ola, and The Yardbirds - Roger the Engineer
Ray Hanson - Thee Hypnotics - Come Down Heavy and Soul, Glitter, and Sin
Tony Iommi - Black Sabbath s/t and Paranoid
Daniel Ash - Bauhaus - Press Eject and Give Me the Tape and Love and Rockets - Express
Billy Duffy - The Cult - Love
Jimmy Page - LZ I, II, Physical Graffiti
Pete Townshend - all of the singles and Live at Leeds up to 1971 (anything pre-Who's Next).
Mick Ronson - Ziggy Stardust
Marc Bolan - all of it


You asked for 7 albums, I listed 15 players and about 30 albums. And that only scratches the surface.

Honorable mentions:

Curtis Mayfield
Leigh Stephens - Blue Cheer - Vincebus Eruptum
Sweet
Slade
Mott the Hoople
Parliament/Funkadelic - Osmium, Up for the Down Stroke, Chocolate City

These are primary influences! Not even Secondary. :p :jam: :lol:
 

NotScott

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It is really hard for me to pick only 7 of my most influential so hopefully this isn't cheating:

Led Zeppelin II - When I was a kid, I found my aunt's record collection in the attic, Doors, Hendrix, Woodstock, Cream and some others, but the only one that really grabbed me was Led Zeppelin II. I loved Page's attitude and his guitar mixed out front. THE SONG REMAINS THE SAME just cemented his spot on my influence list.

ROBIN TROWER LIVE - A friend turned me on to this when he knew I played. To this day, I still think this is one of the best recorded Strat tones ever that had me chasing Strats and Marshalls since I was a teenager. Trower has one of the most expressive left hands and just kicks ass all over this album. He was the first one that I heard that approached solos like a composition instead of just a series of three-finger blues riffs strung together.

Jeff Beck WIRED - I first heard tunes from this album on the radio and was immediately struck by the way he fused a rock attitude with more complex ideas than the typical rock tunes of the day. Beck gave me an appreciation for more complex compositions.

Be-Bop Deluxe LIVE IN THE AIR AGE - I grew up in a neighborhood filled with killer musicians. The jazz guys took a liking to me and turned me on to more interesting material than standard rock. My favorite was this album. Bill Nelson could smoke the doors off of any rock guitarist of the day and he wrote such interesting material. He had killer tone and that fluid, melodic style that I loved but what really impressed me was his solos were like a song in a song. They had starts, middles and ends and they added to the song. An honorable mention for the same effect also goes to Larry Carlton's ROOM 335. Also, Tony Williams Lifetime BELIEVE IT gave me an appreciation for how important it is to play with the best musicians you can find. The guys on that album were all scary good!

Ozzy BLIZZARD OF OZZ - Randy Rhoads had a huge influence on me. He took the attitude, techniques and compositions of my other influences, mixed them up with some classical ideas and amped them all up to 10. I couldn't get enough RR when I was 18 and just starting to play out in clubs. An honorable mention has to go to Michael Shenker's MSG. He was another one with attitude and advanced technique and melodic, composed leads.

Gary Moore STILL GOT THE BLUES - SRV caught my ear because of his great tone and fluid ferocity. He is the one who kept me from going full bore into the progressive rock thing. However, when one of my favorite rock guitarists decided to throw his hat into the blues ring, it forever changed my direction. I loved how Moore played with such attitude and passion. He always made me feel something no matter what he played and he had one of my favorite Les Paul tones ever. He is also the guy that lead me to Peter Green and a deeper appreciation for BB King which really helped me to better understand where many of the guys I mentioned above got their inspiration from.
 

Pappy58

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Jimi Hendrix - Are You Experienced? Axis, Bold As Love, Electric Ladyland
Ron Asheton and James Williamson - The Stooges, Fun House, and Raw Power
Angus and Malcolm - Powerage, Dirty Deeds, and Highway to Hell
Eric Clapton - Beano, Fresh Cream, and Disraeli Gears
Jeff Beck - Truth, Beck-Ola, and The Yardbirds - Roger the Engineer
Ray Hanson - Thee Hypnotics - Come Down Heavy and Soul, Glitter, and Sin
Tony Iommi - Black Sabbath s/t and Paranoid
Daniel Ash - Bauhaus - Press Eject and Give Me the Tape and Love and Rockets - Express
Billy Duffy - The Cult - Love
Jimmy Page - LZ I, II, Physical Graffiti
Pete Townshend - all of the singles and Live at Leeds up to 1971 (anything pre-Who's Next).
Mick Ronson - Ziggy Stardust
Marc Bolan - all of it


You asked for 7 albums, I listed 15 players and about 30 albums. And that only scratches the surface.

Honorable mentions:

Curtis Mayfield
Leigh Stephens - Blue Cheer - Vincebus Eruptum
Sweet
Slade
Mott the Hoople
Parliament/Funkadelic - Osmium, Up for the Down Stroke, Chocolate City

These are primary influences! Not even Secondary. :p :jam: :lol:
You cheated M :rofl:
 

El Pablo

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ACDC Back in Black
Def Leppard Pyromania
Jeff Beck Emotions and Commotions
SRV Couldnt Stand The Weather
Van Halen Van Halen and 1984
The Cars Greatest Hits
Satriani Surfing with Alien
Eric Johnston Ah Via Musicom
 

Spiteface

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Here are mine, not in any order of preference, just as they came to me.

Oasis - Definitely Maybe

It was 1997, I was 14-ish growing out of my "pop" phase. Oasis were already massive, and I got caught up in the Be Here Now hype-train. I started to "get" them, and my dad had bought their debut album a few years prior so I went back to that. Put it this way, Noel Gallagher playing Johnny Marr's burst is why I started and also part of why I like Les Pauls, more than 20 years later. Noel Gallagher from 1992-1996 was on one of the hottest streaks of any british songwriter. So much brilliance. Curse him for making it seem so fucking easy.

Manic Street Preachers - Everything Must Go

Again, something I got into through my dad. He'd got a few of their albums around the time this one came out, as it was a comeback for the band (Look up the disappearance of Richey Edwards), and took them to bigger heights. Earlier albums were either them trying a bit too hard to be Guns N Roses (Generation Terrorists) or too dark and would take me a while to understand what made them awesome (The Holy Bible, actually my favourite by them), but this is where my love for them started to grow. Great songs with an intelligence otherwise missing from UK guitar music at the time.

Manic Street Preachers - The Holy Bible

Cheating to pick 2 by one band, don't care. Like I said, took me a while to get this one. But when I did, I understood. This is effectively the Welsh "In Utero" in some regards (the bulk of the lyrics were written by Richey Edwards, who was clearly suffering some shit), but these are also songs about things that no other UK band was writing about at the time - Anorexia (4st 7lb), the Holocaust (The Intense Humming of Evil), Death Penalty (Archives of Pain), the alleged sexual preferences of dictators (Revol) and Political Correctness/repression of free speech (PCP). All set to some of the best music James Dean Bradfield has ever written (one of my favourite guitarists ever, and the one responsible for shaping these lyrics into songs). Their masterpiece and I am so glad I got to see them perform it live in full 5 years ago.

Mogwai - Come On Die Young

Instrumental Rock. Those two words might put you in the mindset of the likes of Joe Satriani and Steve Vai. In my first couple of years of guitar playing, I was reading magazines and that's what I was led to believe, too. Then I heard a track by this band on a convermount CD with Melody Maker (A now defunct music newspaper, later magazine). The quiet/LOUD/quiet thing had been done plenty by the late-90s (the Pixies creating a template, Nirvana perfecting it), but this was different, way more downbeat, and no vocals. It seemed like the soundtrack to a horror movie you never saw. It changed what I thought "rock" music could be, and led me down a rabbit hole of discovering other bands I would hold dear to my heart. Which brings me to...

My Bloody Valentine - Loveless

Like Mogwai, MBV were a band that changed what I thought rock music could sound like. At the same time, while MBV spawned many imitators and an entire genre of music (Shoegaze), Loveless sounded like nothing that came before or since. Kevin Shields' way with a Fender Jazzmaster tremolo and reverse reverb created a unique voice in late-80s/early-90s indie. Then with closing track "Soon" also made it somewhat danceable.

Smashing Pumpkins - Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness


I got into the Pumpkins a bit too late (2001, they split the previous year and Billy Corgan had formed Zwan), but when I did, I found something I feel was missing from many of their contemporaries in and around the "grunge" scene. Ambition. None of the other bands would have had the balls to release, as a third album, a sprawling double CD, with songs in excess of 7 minutes. This is one of those albums that does a thing I like in the context of a back catalogue - it feels like a perfect nexus of what they were about up to that point while also hinting at where they could go next (1979 feels like it could have fit on Adore)

Ramones - Road to Ruin

What elevated this one above the rest of their prime 70s output is that this is the first time the studio albums matched the live shows in terms of power. At the same time there's a bit more dynamics and variation in the songs, and the songwriting is just better than the first three albums.
 


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