60th Anniversary - What is missing from a real '59

emilxert

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2013
Messages
27
Reaction score
2
Hello, forum! My question is in the title - I've been watching reviews of the 60th anniversary 59 Les Paul and constantly came across minor and semi-major details about the construction of this particular iteration of the R9 like pau ferro, incorrect G letter, incorrect scale, incorrect bridge placement etc.

So now I'm looking for a little assistance here, because I was very eager to get one of these, but a potential regret about this purchase could strike me as soon as Gibson adds a Brazilian board across all future reissues or does something else on a 65th anniversary that would make it yet again closer to a real deal.

So, could anyone enlist "incorrect" parts of the 60th anniversary compared to a real 59 or at least guide me to an existing thread here where it has probably already been discussed a 1000 times? Thanks in advance!
 

Sct13

Premium Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Messages
18,936
Reaction score
23,684
The nitro is industry standard...it has plasticizers for longevity, and it is mixed to conform with EPA guidelines / regulations.. Tuner buttons wont age as the originals (which might be a good thing) ...the binding is from a different company....

But these are very microscopic in comparison to the overall guitar experience. they are great guitars, I have 4 from various years....so go ahead an pull the trigger so I can be jealous
 

Tim Plains

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2008
Messages
13,419
Reaction score
9,663
You'll be waiting an awfully long time for Gibson to make a perfect burst copy. There are 60th Brazilians. You could get one of those.
 

Caretaker

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2007
Messages
7,108
Reaction score
5,715
What`s missing????
Real nitro without plastic.
Correct magnets(metalurgy), wire,etc.
60 years of playing,traveling, cold trunks/trucks, hotter that balls clubs.
The wood used was old then, not like what is used now.
I love the guitar in my avatar.
It is as close to a real burst I have found(and I have played 2 bursts and many 57 goldtops and customs.
But it is not now, never has been and never will be anything close to the real thing.
Even if Gibson opened a vault and everything they used then was there ready to be built, it would still not have the 60 years of being a guitar and developing into what we now.

Let it go, it AIN`T gonna happen, EVER!!!!!!!!!!!
 

swampblues

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
4,695
Reaction score
4,261
60 years of old wood comes to mind for me IMO a guitar is only as good as the wood it was made from
 

mudface

Non-Deadbeat/Non-Prominent
Joined
Aug 29, 2016
Messages
8,600
Reaction score
26,836
Age.


Old pots, old caps,old pickups, old bridge, old tuners, old finish, and yes old wood.

The New Historic reissues are not even made using any of the compositions of materials that the originals were made of..... nothing is the same.

Wood, Finish,Electronics,Glue,Metals, and yes even plastics.....nothing.

They can get close to shape, color, look, feel, construction, and real close to tone,... but none of the materials will be identical to the original.

Therefore a true factory clone can never be made. That is the truth.

If you can accept this fact and just see these instruments for what they are..... really well made guitars that are made in the form of the originals,... with a little more attention to detail then the originals.... you can enjoy them like I do.

Find yourself a great 60 anniversary and enjoy it without all the cork sniffing.:cheers:
 

ARandall

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2012
Messages
14,078
Reaction score
10,120
^ I guess the two of you are saying about the same thing.
The new ones are not made in the same way as the old ones, but unless you only judge a guitars worth based on how close it resembles the old one, then this doesn't prevent the guitar from being good on it own merit.
 

Caretaker

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2007
Messages
7,108
Reaction score
5,715
Todays guitars are good(and bad as with anything else), they just are not what 50`s guitars are and never will be.
 

Tomburst

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2014
Messages
340
Reaction score
447
Regarding old wood I dunno how old the actual mahogany was that Gibson used in 58-60 but when Clapton beck page green kossoff Bloomfield etc made those great sounding recordings they were using 6-10yr old guitars. The same age that a 2009-2013 reissue is today. They weren't using old guitars
 

efstop

Premium Member
Joined
May 29, 2015
Messages
8,275
Reaction score
21,190
I'd put my plywood 2004 Squier Bullet up against any '63 solid wood Teisco any time.
 

1all's Pub

Senior Member
Joined
May 26, 2015
Messages
3,754
Reaction score
3,893
Regarding old wood I dunno how old the actual mahogany was that Gibson used in 58-60 but when Clapton beck page green kossoff Bloomfield etc made those great sounding recordings they were using 6-10yr old guitars. The same age that a 2009-2013 reissue is today. They weren't using old guitars
True this. But, I do believe that the wood Gibson was using back in the 50s to build these guitars was "old growth" wood. So even though, the guitar itself was only a few years old, the wood it was made from was likely a few hundred years old before it was harvested. Whereas today's wood is "new growth" and is harvested much younger.

Now, whether the age of the wood at harvest has *any* affect on the tone of a guitar I honestly couldn't tell you. But it is one variable that can't be replicated in modern Reissues. :)

As to the OP's original question... honestly, this is a tail you can and will chase your whole life if you let yourself get on that path. Every year Gibson is going to "improve" their RIs (at least according to them) to make them more like the originals so every year you will find yourself saying, "If I'd only waited". Sooner or later you just have to either get in the boat or stay on the shore. Best of luck in your choice. :)
 

swampblues

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
4,695
Reaction score
4,261
Sure I’ll catch hell for this but I owned a 1960 and the new Reissues are twice and good as the original 60. I have also played 2 58’s and they were nothing special. I do believe there are unbeatable old Gibson and the same with reissues
 

ARandall

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2012
Messages
14,078
Reaction score
10,120
^ Everybody has their own hearing, and their own style. So even through the same rig 2 players could come to polar opposite conclusions playing the same guitar. In fact 2 players could make opposite conclusions listening to the same player playing the same guitar in the room.

As much as you can say 'only a burst will sound a certain way', the issue is wholly more complex than the false dichotomy that seems to take over the posts when these things are debated.

Take for example the 2 sets of Wizz pickups i own.......1 set wound with his regular wire, 1 from the first run of 1959 wire he acquired.
There is no doubt in my mind these two pickup sets are more than just subtlely different......his offerings don't seem to allow for a different pattern or turn count, so the old wire is the only constructive aspect I can attribute to. So there is obviously something going on with new vs old that is not able to be replicated in this instance.

But pickups don't a whole guitar or tone make........

You still have to mate them with the wood, hardware, frets, strings etc.
And pickups need a good host for them to shine, as my endless swaps in my home made guitars have indicated.
Indeed, the handful of 50s and 6ps p90s I bought before the price bubble arrived also exhibited the same tendencies. So the mere presence of something old does not in any way guarantee stellar results, even if you only ever define this in terms of pure vintage tone.
 

PierM

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2016
Messages
6,289
Reaction score
12,399
I think the OP was not really going into the old wood debate. He was just asking for historical correctness on parts and construction. He didn't really asked about tone.
 

ARandall

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2012
Messages
14,078
Reaction score
10,120
It's still useful Info to have though if you're making a decision. It's amazing how many people assume the vintage correct construction somehow equates to better instrument musically.
And how many RI buyers would sit down with many guitars to play and assess, and yet choose an inferior sounding instrument merely because it had more accurate vintage appointments.
 

Tim Plains

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2008
Messages
13,419
Reaction score
9,663
And how many RI buyers would sit down with many guitars to play and assess, and yet choose an inferior sounding instrument merely because it had more accurate vintage appointments.
How many RI buyers continually dump their older historics merely for newer spec models? Happens all the time.
 

ARandall

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2012
Messages
14,078
Reaction score
10,120
Yeah.....plenty of them swap out its true.

But how many would buy if all the ones they looked at were not a great tone for what they wanted........or would take the old version into the store and try it alongside the new ones and buy a poorer sounding guitar merely because its a more accurate spec??
 


Latest Threads



Top