60s to a 50s neck conversion?

kubi

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Anyone converted or gotten used to using a thicker neck from a thinner one? found the perfect guitar but its a 50s neck and im used to a 60s...what are peoples experiences? :slash:
 

RRfireblade

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I can't. Too old. ;)

But... A skilled luthier can take that 50's down to 60's with minimal refinishing and not much cost (IMO) if you like it that much.

Otherwise I'd say keep looking.
 

AlanH

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Looks like it might not be the perfect guitar for you then....
 

1allspub

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I am one whose gone from liking skinny necks to now preferring fatter necks. Once I got my first Trad with its fat neck and actually played it for more than just a few minutes in a guitar shop, I came to absolutely love it and very much prefer it over the 60s necks. I can still play skinny necks, of course, but they feel underwhelming from a tactile perspective.

Another thing that plays into it strongly with my personal preferences is a rounded profile. Flat-D and asym necks feel "lacking" in my hand. My other guitars (Squier Tele & Strat, Ibanez semi-hollow, Yamaha Pacifica... and heck even my Ibanez acoustic) are all more like a 60s neck in regards to fatness/skinniness... but they are all nice and rounded so they don't feel "lacking" in my hand, just skinnier (ie, they still feel like they fit the palm properly). The flat-D and asym necks feel like they weren't designed for my hand at all... they feel like there's a big gap between my hand and the back of the neck (which there is)... and I find this quite disconcerting. So much so that I got rid of my two Epi LPs (which I otherwise really, really liked) because their necks were so flattened. It just annoyed me when going back and forth between them and my nice, rounded, hand filling Gibson LP Trads' 50s necks.

Selling those 2 Epi LPs led me to diversifying a bit and I got the Tele & Strat & semi-hollow... which, as I said, are all more 60s type profiles from a fatness/skinniness perspective... but rounded and therefore more comfortable and properly shaped to fit in my hand. I'm not saying I couldn't own or play a flat-D or asym necked guitar... but it'd have to be because it (the guitar) was something different than what I already own (ie, I couldn't get another flat-D or asym necked LP... the A/B comparison is just too stark). If it was something with an overall different feel to the guitar like an Exlporer or Flying V or SG and it came with a flat-D or asym neck I could live with it (especially if I got a good deal on it!;))... but it would always be my least favorite guitar as a result probably! Ha!

Anyway, loooooooong story short... yeah, I'm one of those whose converted from skinny to fat! :D
 

Left Paw

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Looks like it might not be the perfect guitar for you then....


^^ This ^^ You are most likely looking at one of the volume-produced models. They make these in quantity with both 50s and 60s necks. Find one with the slimmer neck, if that is what you prefer to play. While you may be able to learn to manage the larger neck, it is a bit of a crapshoot and minimized if you simply find the guitar with the neck you like now.
 

Fernandomania

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I started with thinner necks and now prefer a beefier neck. I can play with both though since I have both kinds. Getting used to a fatter neck took more than a few minutes of playing. Felt weird at first but got better pretty quickly.
 

C_Becker

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When I started playing guitar, I definitely preferred a thinner neck. Started out on a Epi LP Special II.

Nowadays I prefer fatter necks, like my Epi 58 Explorer or even Les Paul Traditional. They are more comfortable for longer playing because I don't have to grip so tight. Bad technique ? Probably, but I still like fatter necks better now. Gibson 60s neck is still very comfortable to play, but I probably wouldn't go thinner than that.

And they have to be round in the back. Wide and flat is much worse than just thin. Still talking about guitar necks, keep your mind out of the gutter :laugh2:

I ordered an Allparts fat neck for my Tele last week, almost a full inch at the first fret, because the CVC neck is very skinny. Picking it up from customs next week.
 

jack94

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Ive always used thin necks mostly Ibanez which are REALLY thin, but i prefer my les paul custom neck by miles
 

smk506

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Mark me as one who has gone from skinny to fat.

I never gave it an awful lot of thought when I started playing, I just liked certain guitars and if I could afford them, I bought them. At some point I came to realize I didn't really like ultra skinny necks very much, the Ibanez Wizard profile or the one Jackson uses thats fairly similar to a super skinny classical neck. Ironically enough, I think part of that realization was after playing a classical guitar with a huge neck that a friend of a friends father had built.

In hind sight most of my favorite guitars have had chunky necks, and an even later percentage of the ones I still have do, a fair amount of skinny necks have come and gone.

C_Becker, I think you will like your all parts fat tele neck, I love mine so much I got the same one for my strat too.
 

C_Becker

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C_Becker, I think you will like your all parts fat tele neck, I love mine so much I got the same one for my strat too.

I hope I will, I ordered the thin finish nitro maple version especially from the USA and it wasn't cheap. But other than nut width I hope that it will be close to my LP Traditional. :thumb:
 

foxtrot

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I'm sure a lot of people would get used to a 50s neck pretty quickly, but everyone is different.

I guess I started out on thinner necks but it's never been a big deal to me. I have guitars with thicker necks now too, but I play all of them, so I wouldn't really say I moved from thinner to thicker. My hands adapt pretty quick to whatever I'm playing and neck differences are never that much of a conscious/active thing going through my head (unless I'm playing a Hard V profile or something, but even then, after the initial notice/recognition of it I don't think about it much).

Anyhow, you could probably find someone to work on the neck for you if you really wanted. I would see if you get used to it first though. Or, if this is a guitar you're still looking at and haven't purchased, either spend a lot of time playing it or just hold off until you find the right guitar with more of a 60s neck.
 

jbrew1977

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Personal experience has been the thin ones may be easy to start quickly with, but once a nice fat one (like mine) is experienced it's hard to stop!
 

LP242

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The only time I play on a thin neck, is when I use my Ibanez S470DXQM for some whammy work. On LP's, I prefer the 50's neck. My two '93 Standards have 'em, and so does my BFG. I've got an Epi Custom Black Beauty which was a gift from a friend, and I'm looking to have its neck replaced by a beefier one by my luthier. Sure, it'll involve some work, but I just hate that skinny neck and I don't use it very often because of that. Which is a shame, because it's a decent workhorse guitar...
 

GibsonKramer

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Who says you gotta play one thing?

I love the neck on my SGJ, and that's a "Plastic Guitar," according to a Gibson Snob that commented one day. And I find the fatter neck, actually easier on my old hands. They don't cramp up as much. I don't find it that big of an adjustment, to play. I used to finish up my playing, with the SGJ before my hands got strong enough again, for playing as long as I wanted to. When I first got the '14 LP... I quickly bought the SGJ, so I could get a couple hours of playing in, instead of 30 minutes.

Now, it doesn't really matter.

I think its mostly because growing up, my mom had this old Martin acoustic, that had this little body, wide, flat neck... and just sounded sublime. I'd have bought it off her, had she not sold it... but wasn't in the position, when she needed the money.
 

Roshy Boy

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Give the 50's neck a try. I had one on my Trad Pro II. It was only .83 at the first fret. Some of the 60's necks I've seen on Wildwood's website are .79. That's not a lot of difference.

I think the 50's necks are more rounded. But not much bigger. At least that's my experience on non historic Les Pauls.
 

smorgdonkey

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I got into guitars in the '80s with Kramers, Charvels and all kinds of guitars with smaller necks. I played guitars like that for ages.

I never got my first '50s neck until I had played for 20 years or so and I love the '50s neck. I have since sold almost everything with small necks and now have only a few remaining. Although preferring the '50s neck wasn't the motivating factor for the sell-off, it certainly was a determining factor in which guitars stayed and which guitars were added since.
 

02589

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It's not hard. I prefer the 60s, although I have several 50s which are no problem. Can you play a different scale length guitar, such changing from a LP to a Strat? It's different, but shouldn't be a deal breaker if you have the right mindset.

I find some of the really fat baseball bat necks to be very different but I've never played one for more than a few minutes. But just changing from a 60s to a Trad or Custom or other Gibson 50s is no problem.

If the seller says it's really fat, think twice. If the seller says it's comfortable, give it a go.
 

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