50s Les Paul standard vs 60s Les Paul standard

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This is peev of min. I don't understand why there are so many different neck profiles. It would be fine if there was a reliable way to cross-reference them but Gibson is like the Wild Wild West of profiles. It would so great if they would at least put up an official "here's what every one of our in-production profiles is" chart. :cool:
with hand sanded parts that is pretty difficult to do. Even 2020 50s LPs have pretty decent variation in 1st fret neck depths: https://wildwoodguitars.com/product-category/electrics/gibson-usa/les-paul-standard-gibson-usa/?orderby=price
 

PauloQS

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^Precisely. The reason PRS has such neck depth consistency is due to the heavy usage of machines. Essentially the neck comes out of the CNC ready to be glued to the guitar save for some very minor touch ups. With Gibson the necks are rough cut on CNC and the final shaping and sanding are done by hand.
 

Pappy35

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...with hand sanded parts that is pretty difficult to do.
With Gibson the necks are rough cut on CNC and the final shaping and sanding are done by hand.
I get both of these points and have been crawling all over Wildwood's site recently waiting for more 50's to come back in and have noted how they vary one after another in the same line (kudos to them for putting those measurements on there BTY).

I wasn't clear. I didn't mean to imply that they had to be exactly the same from one ot the next, just that Gibson should put a cross section up to show the relative difference between them. I know there are comparisons on the web, but the one's I've seen aren't by Gibson.

The variation is perfectly normal but there has to be some way to define what the ideal shape will be for each model. I mean, why advertise a neck shape for a model (Slim Taper, C, etc.) if there isn't some standard they go by? Using the "it's totally random" line of thinking they should stop saying "SlimTaper" (or whatever) and just say "luck of the draw" if they vary. There'd be no way to even guess whether one should target a 50's or a 60's or whatever.

All I'm really saying is that it would help us newbies to decide between models if there was some online source to be able to compare.
 
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I wasn't clear. I didn't mean to imply that they had to be exactly the same from one ot the next, just that Gibson should put a cross section up to show the relative difference between them. I know there are comparisons on the web, but the one's I've seen aren't by Gibson.
They do give us some inclination as to what to expect, and its not really luck of the draw. This is often posted but I think this holds pretty true. In each of their listings, gibson specifies the neck type: 50s round, rounded XL, slim taper, 60s. asymmetrical, etc. If you account for hand-sanding variances, I think this is more or less a good representation.

Even knowing this information, it doesnt really tell the full story, as everyone knows, once you get the guitar in hand, things can feel much different than whats listed on a spec sheet. Furthermore, hundredths of an inch variation between 1st fret neck depths may completely be lost on a "newbie", so its just another data point to convolute the search.

Long story short, if you want a fuller neck, look for anything marketed as "50s". If you dont want a full neck, then your search is that much easier.

My 50s Standard feels like the 2nd listing, 50s rounded D
 

Gtarzan81

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They do give us some inclination as to what to expect, and its not really luck of the draw. This is often posted but I think this holds pretty true. In each of their listings, gibson specifies the neck type: 50s round, rounded XL, slim taper, 60s. asymmetrical, etc. If you account for hand-sanding variances, I think this is more or less a good representation.

Even knowing this information, it doesnt really tell the full story, as everyone knows, once you get the guitar in hand, things can feel much different than whats listed on a spec sheet. Furthermore, hundredths of an inch variation between 1st fret neck depths may completely be lost on a "newbie", so its just another data point to convolute the search.

Long story short, if you want a fuller neck, look for anything marketed as "50s". If you dont want a full neck, then your search is that much easier.

My 50s Standard feels like the 2nd listing, 50s rounded D
Same here for my 50s. Rounded D
 

MiniB

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My last R8 had a 1st .88 to 12th 1.03 and had huge shoulders. By comparison, my 2020 USA Standard has .88 to .98 and felt like a slim taper in comparison. Had to get used to the USA's one for it to feel 'full' again. Much easier as I get older for necks to have less shoulder.
 
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MiniB

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So my USA Standard with 50's neck is like the 2nd/50's rounded 'D' shape, my 2019 Memphis ES-335 Dot has at the 60's style oval 'C' but is a bit thicker front to back at .86 to .99, and my last R9 was more like the first one, the big 'U' shape.

Another thing that makes a big difference in how a neck feels in overall size is the 'rolling' of the fingerboard/binding edges, like on my ES-335.
 

PauloQS

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I’m going to go against the grain here, but I’d describe the neck on both ‘50s I’ve owned and my Slash Standard as the 3rd shape, soft V. And just a clarification, the Standard ‘50s and Slash Standard spec sheet read Vintage ‘50s and the neck profile, not ‘50s rounded.
 

MiniB

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I’m going to go against the grain here, but I’d describe the neck on both ‘50s I’ve owned and my Slash Standard as the 3rd shape, soft V. And just a clarification, the Standard ‘50s and Slash Standard spec sheet read Vintage ‘50s and the neck profile, not ‘50s rounded.
I would agree that it's a pretty even shape and could feel with what's particularly described as a 'Soft-V' in those pics, especially in lower frets. It's just that when I think of a soft V, and with necks that I've owned that have it, there's a more pronounced and noticeable bottom 'hull'/center, a la
'boatneck'.

I think some Historic '59s start to feel more like that. Also, all of those cutaways in that diagram look more like the 12th fret than the 1st.
 

danzego

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I would agree that it's a pretty even shape and could feel with what's particularly described as a 'Soft-V' in those pics, especially in lower frets. It's just that when I think of a soft V, and with necks that I've owned that have it, there's a more pronounced and noticeable bottom 'hull'/center, a la
'boatneck'.

I think some Historic '59s start to feel more like that. Also, all of those cutaways in that diagram look more like the 12th fret than the 1st.
Agreed. All three Custom Shop RI’s I had this year, two 2019 R9’s (which went back) and the 2020 V1 60th/60 I kept all had profiles in the general shape of the “soft V” one (the first R9 actually felt a bit more like a soft V than the others, were are more rounded). My 50s Standard is like the Rounded D picture.

My 2019 Traditional, which was spec’ed as a “59 Rounded” by Gibson, is actually more like the Modern Flat Oval D in shape. Depthwise, it measures .81 at the 1st fret through .97 at the 12th.
 

PauloQS

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I would agree that it's a pretty even shape and could feel with what's particularly described as a 'Soft-V' in those pics, especially in lower frets. It's just that when I think of a soft V, and with necks that I've owned that have it, there's a more pronounced and noticeable bottom 'hull'/center, a la
'boatneck'.

I think some Historic '59s start to feel more like that. Also, all of those cutaways in that diagram look more like the 12th fret than the 1st.
Yup, I’m with you and @danzego, the later R9s (2018-present) are more soft V than Gibson USA vintage ‘50s profile. Shoulders on R9 are slimmer.

I also agree that what the we’re calling soft V here is not as pronounced as other companies, such as Fender, call soft V, which by the way is one of my favorite Fender necks, when they are of reasonable depth, which is not always the case.

I guess what’s happening here is that I’m having a similar reaction to the D profile as you’re having to the soft V. Perhaps because of Epiphone, I associate D profiles with a flat back and heavy shoulders. In the neck diagrams, the D shape has a hint of a flat back. I don’t feel that flat back with my Standard ‘50s or Slash Standard. I feel the back of the neck very evenly rounded.

Funny thing is that I never owned an Epiphone. I went from a Samick Greg Bennett Avion 3, because at that point even a good Epiphone was outside my budget, to a Gibson. When I tried Epiphone LPs, the neck profile was first thing I notice, particularly the shoulders. I tried the inspired by Gibson Standard ‘50s and found the neck to be very different from the Gibson USA counterpart.
 

pondcaster

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I’m going to go against the grain here, but I’d describe the neck on both ‘50s I’ve owned and my Slash Standard as the 3rd shape, soft V. And just a clarification, the Standard ‘50s and Slash Standard spec sheet read Vintage ‘50s and the neck profile, not ‘50s rounded.
I'm thinking like @PauloQS, the few new 50s I've had were (imo) subtly leaning towards soft V, too.

No flat back D shape at all.
 

MiniB

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Yup, I’m with you and @danzego, the later R9s (2018-present) are more soft V than Gibson USA vintage ‘50s profile. Shoulders on R9 are slimmer.

I also agree that what the we’re calling soft V here is not as pronounced as other companies, such as Fender, call soft V, which by the way is one of my favorite Fender necks, when they are of reasonable depth, which is not always the case.

I guess what’s happening here is that I’m having a similar reaction to the D profile as you’re having to the soft V. Perhaps because of Epiphone, I associate D profiles with a flat back and heavy shoulders. In the neck diagrams, the D shape has a hint of a flat back. I don’t feel that flat back with my Standard ‘50s or Slash Standard. I feel the back of the neck very evenly rounded.

Funny thing is that I never owned an Epiphone. I went from a Samick Greg Bennett Avion 3, because at that point even a good Epiphone was outside my budget, to a Gibson. When I tried Epiphone LPs, the neck profile was first thing I notice, particularly the shoulders. I tried the inspired by Gibson Standard ‘50s and found the neck to be very different from the Gibson USA counterpart.
Soft V/Boatneck is one of my favorite profiles as well. Had a Warmoth Strat neck in that profile once and it was great.
 

dimeified

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I got my 50's Standard yesterday, and the neck is way thicker than the 60's Standard that I returned. It's a very comfortable neck, I'm glad I didn't keep the 60s. I'm surprised that people have said that the necks are only slightly different from each other, for me it's a night and day difference. fwiw, I'm going by feel and memory, I didn't actually measure anything.

Also I want to add that I was a little worried that the 50s pickups wouldn't have enough output for my taste, but I'm using an EVH 5150 50w 6L6. The 50s Standard matches up nicely, very crisp and tight, with plennnnnty of gain. Correct me if I'm wrong but EVH usually liked to use medium output pickups anyway, which is why the 5150 amps are gain monsters.
 
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