3D Printed Gun Company....

geochem1st

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3D-printed gun company gets machinery repossessed by manufacturer

3dgun.jpg


It's beginning to look as if someone doesn't want Defense Distributed to manufacture and distribute the world's first open-source 3D printed firearm, as the company responsible for the 3D printer used to design the prototype has reclaimed its machine for fear of illegality.


Plans to create the world’s first open-source fully operational firearm – created on a 3D printer – have hit a slight snag with the news that the manufacturer that created the printer being used in the design process has seized the machine being used by the people behind the project, claiming that it is not willing to allow its hardware to be used for a project that violates federal firearms laws.

We reported on Defense Distributed’s Wiki Weapon project last week after it reached its $20,000 crowdfunding goal essentially solo, having been pushed out by IndieGoGo for, again, concerns surrounding the legality of actually creating a working gun via 3D printer with an aim of then releasing the plans online for free, so that anyone with access to 3D printing technology could, worryingly easily, create a firearm of their own. The project is the brainchild of one Cody Wilson, a law student from Texas who defended it in the abstract under the constitution’s right to bear arms – “People say you’re going to allow people to hurt people, well, that’s one of the sad realities of liberty.

People abuse freedom, but that’s no excuse not to have these rights or to feel good about someone taking them away from you,” he said in response to criticism – but also admitted that there may be valid legal concerns about the project moving forward. “I haven’t felt any real heat yet, but I think it’s very possible the project might happen outside of America or the files might be hosted outside of America,” he’s said when asked about potential legal threats. “The point of manufacture might also have to be outside of the United States.”

Apparently, that point of design may need to be outside of the United States as well, following new developments.

Stratsys, the company that created the uPrint SE 3D printer being used by Defense Distributed in the creation of the prototype, has released a statement about its seizure of the equipment, saying that it acted after discovering that Defense Distributed didn’t have a firearm manufacturer license. “It is the policy of Stratasys not to knowingly allow its printers to be used for illegal purposes,” the company explained in a letter to Wilson himself. That’s a charge that Wilson denies, saying “Our intentions are not to break the law. This is America; I don’t need to register a thing.”

If that sounds a little over-the-top and defiant to you, Wilson can apparently back it up. He told the Guardian newspaper that he approached the US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives about Wiki Weapon, and was told that there were no clear guidelines on whether or not a license was necessary. “Basically, the law has not anticipated this,” Wilson explained. “Current laws rely on conventional ideas of what a gun is.”

Wilson isn’t deterred by this latest setback, having applied for a manufacturer’s license, and started work on turning Defense Distributed into a company in the traditional sense. “We’ll get there,” he said of the project’s ultimate aim, “but I guess I’ve got to turn into a capitalist before it’s all said and done.”


Read more: 3D-printed gun company gets machinery repossessed by manufacturer | Digital Trends


Related:

Can you really just print your own working firearm with a 3D printer? | Digital Trends
 

PraXis

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3D printers are awesome. I'm looking forward more to the ability to print my own car parts and avoid the dealer rape.
 

bertzie

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Why would they be worried about it? 3d printing metal is a very involved process that very few people have the financial resources to do.
 

bertzie

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really... works just fine.

The heat from the first round would melt any rifling in the barrel. And that's making the assumption the barrel doesn't explode the first shot.
 

bildozr

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I'm not concerned over this as the kind of resources you need to print this means you've got a lot of money.
So you print their gun. What's it shoot, .22lr? I bet you could get one shot then you'd have to discard it.

But regardless their idea is sort of stupid. Erbody and their mother knows I'm all about ownership, but I don't think you should have access to firearms without passing a background check. That's why Felons can't own guns.
 

Arzachel

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typical mankind, makes a wondrous new invention whats he do with it?
 

Comanche

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I'm printing 1980's model Heather Locklear and Pheobe Cates and making a Comanche sammish.
 

sonar1

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typical mankind, makes a wondrous new invention whats he do with it?



Yeah.

The guy that invented the Bic lighter didn't even smoke.

He was just trying to come up with something to light his farts, and look how many people killed themselves lighting cigarettes with his brilliant fart lighting invention.
 

lespaul01

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Yeah.

The guy that invented the Bic lighter didn't even smoke.

He was just trying to come up with something to light his farts, and look how many people killed themselves lighting cigarettes with his brilliant fart lighting invention.


killed by lighting cigarettes? Don't they have to smoke them?
 

sonar1

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killed by lighting cigarettes? Don't they have to smoke them?


Bear with me, I'm stretching to make a joke.

Apparently we rode different kinds of school buses. Lighting farts was all the rage in Junior High (or was that upper division College)?
 

Actinic

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What about printing a guitar? Sounds stupid at first, but not every part has to be produced by a 3D printer. With the right composite materials for the body and the neck, it might not be as far-fetched as you might think. It would probably sound better than a Firebird X.
 

Roberteaux

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typical mankind, makes a wondrous new invention whats he do with it?

Ah, but ain't that the way of it?

***************

Very interesting!

It sort of sounds to me as if the company that built the machinery is either avoiding potential future legal entanglements, or is making some sort of "statement" via this confiscation. Or perhaps both.

Whatever: the whole thing ultimately registers as a sort of "so what?" development in light of the fact that the USA is already awash in firearms. Depending on who you ask, there are already somewhere between 200-300 million of them in circulation already. Legal or illegal, pretty much anybody who wants one (or more) is already in possession of them, and pretty much anybody who doesn't want one still doesn't have one and can't do much other than to disapprove of-- and attempt to "reeducate" or otherwise persuade-- those who do.

So really, this whole matter is more or less machts nichts from the get go. The Vietnamese were known to manufacture parts for weapons-- and in some case, entire weapons-- on wooden lathes that they hand-built in the middle of the jungle. Ultimately, it's only the primers of the individual cartridges that would be exceptionally difficult to reproduce without very specialized equipment-- but even that can be gotten around in any of several ways.

It's also worth noting that the prospective illicit firearms shop doesn't need anything high-tech or difficult to obtain as part of the tool-up anyway. In fact, one doesn't even need much by way of machine tools or welding skills. There are all sorts of ways to create firearms using very common hand tools... and metal working isn't exactly rocket science, CDC machine tools and computerized assembly lines notwithstanding. Anybody who wants to take it to the next level by learning machine tool skills and welding needs only to procure the equipment, study the craft's literature, and set about to practicing it. It's a lot easier to learn to do such things well than it is to play the guitar, trust me.

A person with a very inexpensive (like, 300 dollar) Chinese-made hobby lathe and very basic machining and welding skills can crank out firearms all day long so long as he's at least borderline competent. A great many of any weapon's parts can be fabricated from most any sort of scrap metal out there, except that the firearm's bolt, chamber and barrel must be made of steel-- but there's no shortage of that out there. Any place that handles sheet metal can mass produce those things that it would be less efficient (but classier) to machine.

And if you have a lathe you can make a mill, as well as more lathes. And if you have a mill, it's easy to make a sheet metal bender... just two junked cars on blocks in front of the ol' trailer and maybe a bit of bar stock of both the liquid and ferrous type, and you, too, can become a small-time weapons magnate!

Next time you go by a lawnmower repair shop, be afraid! :laugh2:

Next up: how to turn pig shit into high explosives. Seriously, folks: it can be done!

--R :D
 

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