2021 Fretboards

petec

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Hey Folks, hope all is cool! I got the LP bug this year and have ended up buying 3. Bizarrely the boards on my 50s Standard & 60s Classic look completely different in colour despite both being the same wood (according to the specs online). Any thoughts?
 

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Southwest

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My 60s Standard had the same look when it arrived. The board was bone dry. A light touch of lemon oil darkened it nicely.
 

integra evan

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Yeah the board on my 50s Standard I just got is super dark.
 

ehb

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Woods can vary in color.....some all over the map...

A block of ebony below...

1634392985071.png
 

Telechamp

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Try some Music Nomad F-One oil. The F-One considerably darkened up the lighter rosewood board on my 2015 LP Special DC, and the board has stayed the darker color after using the F-One..

Before and after pics - -









 

moreles

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I wonder how the dark RW fretboard "standard" came to be, since neither BRW, the common material in the past, and EIRW, the stuff used today, is rarely super-dark -- look at every RW-bodied guitar, ever -- yet most owners crave super-dark fretboards, and the vintage examples are generally way dark, too. Obviously, finger oil will soak into the board from playing, but nobody plays way up on an acoustic guitar fretboard -- yet all those vintage Martins have uniformly dark boards from nut to bridge. Did Martin, and everyone, treat those boards to make them distinctly dark?
 

Kaicho8888

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Martin uses mainly Richlite... I heard on new guitars... don't know how far back they started.
 

Wuuthrad

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I wonder how the dark RW fretboard "standard" came to be, since neither BRW, the common material in the past, and EIRW, the stuff used today, is rarely super-dark -- look at every RW-bodied guitar, ever -- yet most owners crave super-dark fretboards, and the vintage examples are generally way dark, too. Obviously, finger oil will soak into the board from playing, but nobody plays way up on an acoustic guitar fretboard -- yet all those vintage Martins have uniformly dark boards from nut to bridge. Did Martin, and everyone, treat those boards to make them distinctly dark?
I have my doubts that most people prefer dark boards, but it does seem the people that do are complaining the loudest.

Martin uses mainly Richlite... I heard on new guitars... don't know how far back they started.
Martin uses Richlite on the Road series and X series, Ebony on most others. Not sure when they started using Richlite or if they dye Ebony, which is common with some other guitar makers, but they do recommend against even using lemon oil on their fretboards!

My Martin dread w/ Ebony board has never left a black residue on my fingers, so I kind of doubt they would, especially given that and they are extremely committed to sustainability:



I am of the opinion that people are using way too much oil on their boards, and just playing the guitar does enough. Especially some of the newer Gibsons which look lighter, but aren‘t actually dry, it’s just the fretboard treatment they use which itself dries a lighter shade coating the board.

I wonder do some of these guys actually play the guitar, or do they think it’s a tossed Salad? lol
 

mvenuti1980

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I don’t mind lighter rosewood, but like the other guys I do use some music nomad oil on the fretboard whenever I take possession of a guitar. I’ve only once had an ebony fretboard and it looked just like my darker rosewood guitars. If I ever get a LPC, I want the ebony uniformly dark, even if that means dye is used.
 

MP4-22

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I like variety.... If all my fretboards looked the same it would be boring. Secondly get one with a ebony fret board and then you won't obsess over dark rosewood anymore because none of them will look dark compared to smooth dark ebony board.
 

dro

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Just curious, Does the description say the Rosewood came from the same tree?
 

mr. rj

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Hey Folks, hope all is cool! I got the LP bug this year and have ended up buying 3. Bizarrely the boards on my 50s Standard & 60s Classic look completely different in colour despite both being the same wood (according to the specs online). Any thoughts?
Some people like dark boards, some like grainy boards, some like lighter boards....I for one, love them all!
 

dro

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I like....different.

I don't want to sound like everybody else. I don't want to look like everybody else.

I love the fact that everybody's different.

I love the fact that every guitar is different.
 

gball

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I am of the opinion that people are using way too much oil on their boards, and just playing the guitar does enough. Especially some of the newer Gibsons which look lighter, but aren‘t actually dry, it’s just the fretboard treatment they use which itself dries a lighter shade coating the board.
Agreed. Usually, but not always, when I get a new Gibson it is slightly dry. I oil it once, and then it stays good just by playing it - I have rarely had to oil a fretboard a second time.
 

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