2017 Gibson Custom Shop Historic 1960 Les Paul MF Spec

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Hey ya'll, I'm in fairly uncharted territory here insofar as I have limited knowledge of 'Burst' reissues. Hell, I never thought I'd be seriously considering a regular ol' Standard, much less any form of R0. Anyway, I've got an offer on the table between 40%-45% less than list (same as the sale price they had a couple weeks ago) on one of these Musician's Friend spec'd R0s:

Gibson Custom Historic 1960 Les Paul Standard PSL

In addition to the price markdown, I get 16% (as opposed to the usual 8%) kickback in MF bucks. But, despite some pretty extensive research in the last couple of weeks, I don't feel I know enough about these or any other Historics to tell if they're worth it or not. From what I've been told by my sales guy is that what separates these from the "standard" 2017 R0s is some of the wiring and that these finishes weren't offered at the time.

While I know I could scour the used market for some nice deals, the 0% for 48 months financing offer here is really the only reason I am even considering this. So, it's kind of a one-off thing.

Anyway, given my limited expertise in this area, I ask the wiser among you, is this a worthy deal on a three-year old NOS?
 

Gtarzan81

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$3600 for that new is a decent deal. Used R0 go for low 3k range or so.
 

jamman

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OK, i'll give some thoughts. 1st . Do you like the guitar ? Do you like the price ? since that is relative to who is paying for it . Did you look at the Dark Burst on that page listing ? It's is a lighter weight , which I like with a LP .
IMO , it's an average top (both) but acceptably nice .
My problem with buying a guitar from the big box stores is GC and MF don't normally get the "best" from Gibson .
Plus , You can not test it before you buy . So I would figure part of the big picture that you may send it back .
When I was in the States and checking guitars at GC I never tried 1 that I felt was worth buying (after buying my 1st. USA LP in 2005 which is a fine guitar be not a CS ).... So ....
I'd be looking elsewhere and shopping around . $$$ is a huge factor ,but , better pay more for a better guitar for a little more $$$ then spending less for 1 you never bind with .

BTW a CS LP is made different ,with different specs than a USA model Gibson . IMO , It will be apparent has soon as you have in hand and play it ... For me it was a huge difference and I don't even look at a USA LP's anymore . But I'm not buying any ,anymore . I have all I need Good Luck
 
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Thanks a lot @jamman and @Gtarzan81! I appreciate your help. Just what I was looking for.

I think it’s probably best to just wait it out until I can scoop up a decent used R8. I don’t care too much about the top being figured, just want a well-made player that looks “bursty.”
 

TH58Burst

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just my double pennies. It’s WAY easier to spend someone else’s $$$ for sure. But, if you were to buy this guitar (a beauty, IMO) you’re basically paying ‘used’ price for a new guitar. So in the case that you don’t bond with it, which could happen, you wouldn’t lose your rear-end on selling it. You MIGHT even be able to sell it for more than what you paid, don’t quote though!!! Others on here would know more than me. My thought would be to get the guitar, and chances are you’ll love it, but if ya don’t, you can sell it and get one that you do bond with. I’m only thinking this because of the drastic price cut you’re getting on it, and that’s what I would do if I was in your predicament. I’ve bought two CS Gibson’s online, and both have been stunners that you’d have to pry outta my cold dead hands to get away from me. That doesn’t happen all the time though.
 

simon connor

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I have a 2017 R0 that I bought here on MLP several months ago. I paid $3500 for it. It looks just like that one at MF actually. My two cents is that you’re getting a new custom shop guitar for a used guitar price. I believe MF have a 30 day return policy - it might even be 45 - so you’d have plenty of time to decide whether you wanted to keep it. Also FYI an R8 is going to have quite a different feel to it than an R0, as the R8s have thicker necks.
 

Thunder Dump

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I just saw those remaining ones listed on their site for $3999 which is a decent price for a NOS Historic R0, but their original asking price of $7099 (and up for some of the others) was just stupid--not even Wildwood marks up their PSL R0s that much, so the actual deal you're getting isn't quite as good as it seems. Nonetheless, the guys running the Private Reserve over at MF are pretty decent--they'll answer all your questions and get you some natural light photos if you ask. At the end of the day, these are really good R0s that have slightly different specs (mostly color) than what Gibson was producing as a standard R0 in 2017.

At that price you're not stealing it, but you're not getting ripped off either. If the financing is what makes it more attractive, then so much the better.
 

simon connor

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PS: As far as I can tell (and I have researched this pretty extensively), there is no difference between the MF guitar and a regular R0. Sometimes the color is specifically chosen by MF/Guitar Center, but other than that it is a normal R0 - same neck size and shape, same pickups, same frets, hide glue etc. It also doesn't have the "GC" on the serial number like some of the Guitar Center models do, and which significntly reduces it's resale value. It is a 'real" R0, with the color selected by Musician's Friend. Even that looks pretty much the same as a "regular" R0 in Lemonburst to me. Also, it isn't used, it is new, but three years old.
 
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PS: As far as I can tell (and I have researched this pretty extensively), there is no difference between the MF guitar and a regular R0. Sometimes the color is specifically chosen by MF/Guitar Center, but other than that it is a normal R0 - same neck size and shape, same pickups, same frets, hide glue etc. It also doesn't have the "GC" on the serial number like some of the Guitar Center models do, and which significntly reduces it's resale value. It is a 'real" R0, with the color selected by Musician's Friend. Even that looks pretty much the same as a "regular" R0 in Lemonburst to me. Also, it isn't used, it is new, but three years old.
Thanks for the info! Speaking of the neck shape, I heard it’s supposed to be the V2. Can anyone verify that?
 

simon connor

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As I understand it the V2 neck is the one that is the same as a standard R0 neck - which is to say it is slightly thinner than an R9. The three sizes are, in order of thickest to thinnest, the same thickness as an R9, then the normal R0 size, then a slightly thinner than "normal" R0 size, respectively. The idea was to represent the transition from the thicker R9 neck at the beginning of the 1960 model year through gradients of thickness to a quite thin neck by the end of that year. I have all three (not V1, V2 and V3, but three Gibson neck thicknesses) and I have to say I like them all. ES 335 - 0.80" at the first fret, R0 - 0.85/1st fret, and R9 - 0.90"/1st fret. My opinion: you can't go wrong with that R0. I absolutely love mine. I love my R9 too, but that neck is pretty thick - and the R8s are even thicker! And if you don't like it just return it!
 
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As I understand it the V2 neck is the one that is the same as a standard R0 neck - which is to say it is slightly thinner than an R9. The three sizes are, in order of thickest to thinnest, the same thickness as an R9, then the normal R0 size, then a slightly thinner than "normal" R0 size, respectively. The idea was to represent the transition from the thicker R9 neck at the beginning of the 1960 model year through gradients of thickness to a quite thin neck by the end of that year. I have all three (not V1, V2 and V3, but three Gibson neck thicknesses) and I have to say I like them all. ES 335 - 0.80" at the first fret, R0 - 0.85/1st fret, and R9 - 0.90"/1st fret. My opinion: you can't go wrong with that R0. I absolutely love mine. I love my R9 too, but that neck is pretty thick - and the R8s are even thicker! And if you don't like it just return it!

Thanks, Simon! That's actually good news. I'm not the biggest fan of the Slim Taper D, but my hands are definitely closer to "small" than "big.". I prefer a "C" shape profile, as I play mostly Fenders with fatter backs and round Cs. But I actually do quite like these to have fat necks. However, with 12" radius fretboards, I've found I lean toward a slightly thinner neck to mitigate the increase in width -- I just don't much care for the "D" shaped profiles I've found on a good number of Gibson and Epiphone necks (whether Lesters or 335s).

And I appreciate your input! Though, I know if I get one in my hands, there's little chance I'm going to want to send it back! Even if it means I'll likely have to sell a good chunk of my existing collection.
 

simon connor

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Thanks, Simon! That's actually good news. I'm not the biggest fan of the Slim Taper D, but my hands are definitely closer to "small" than "big.". I prefer a "C" shape profile, as I play mostly Fenders with fatter backs and round Cs. But I actually do quite like these to have fat necks. However, with 12" radius fretboards, I've found I lean toward a slightly thinner neck to mitigate the increase in width -- I just don't much care for the "D" shaped profiles I've found on a good number of Gibson and Epiphone necks (whether Lesters or 335s).

And I appreciate your input! Though, I know if I get one in my hands, there's little chance I'm going to want to send it back! Even if it means I'll likely have to sell a good chunk of my existing collection.

My R9 is a 2012. It is 0.90" at the first fret. I really wanted to know if an R0's smaller neck would work better for me (my ES335 is 0.80"/1st fret and I like it a lot.) So I bought a lightly used 2017 R0. It has a 0.85"/1st fret neck, so right in between the 335 and the R9. After playing the new R0 for awhile I realized there is another difference, which is the shape of the neck, and more specifically what are known as the "shoulders." As far as I can tell that is the difference between a D and a C shape, and it refers to the beginning of the curve, just below the neck binding. Anyway, my R0 seems to have less shoulder than the R9. People say that the shoulders have been reduced on the newer R models, so now I want to a newer R9 as well. But buying loads of these things just to experiment with different neck shapes seems pretty ridiculous, especially as I seem more able to buy them, than I am to sell them! I still have the R9 - It's harder to play for some things, and easier for others. But then there is this: I think my less-shoulders R0 still has more "D" shape than some guitars do - I used to have a great Carvin CT6 that had both a thinner and more C shaped neck. So it seems to be about a combination of thickness AND shape. But then there's maybe the most important thing - these Custom Shop Gibsons are just very, very fine instruments. I get them in my hands and I'm just astonished by them. I think that might be the most important element here (although obviously I do not know what other guitars you have.) The Custom Shops are just so impressively well made that they just kind of suck you into their excellent world and you fall in love with them.
 

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