1983 50 watt JCM 800 or new silver Jubilee?

mokume

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Older Marshalls are a dream to work on. AND they sound great.
 

LongBeach

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I honestly haven't played a S.J.
But, I do own an early 84 2204 (I say early because it has vertical input jacks. 84 they switched over to horizontal) I learned all that good stuff here :thumb:

I love the damn thing.
But, it is soooooooooo LOUD :dude::dude::dude:
 

frankv

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I honestly haven't played a S.J.
But, I do own an early 84 2204 (I say early because it has vertical input jacks. 84 they switched over to horizontal) I learned all that good stuff here :thumb:

I love the damn thing.
But, it is soooooooooo LOUD :dude::dude::dude:

LOUD?....LOOK.. Notice the Master Volume and Gain Knobs.. this is how you play one of these things. Low Input with an Overdrive.. Don't forget the attenuator.. a good one...

20150118_145331_zpsmzotgivv.jpg
 

frankv

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I have a 50watt JMP from 1980 sounds great.:dude::dude:


I want one of those 4 hole versions. I have a modding DVD by Jackson that I want to try out.. Do drilling.. Just tweaks..
 

mdubya

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Guitar Denter compares and contrasts an original Jube to the Reissue.

[ame]www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0_2-jCKSNM[/ame]

Johan demos why 2204's are awesome. That is the tone!!!

[ame]www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbQSpQt2aV8[/ame]

You can boost a 2204 to get the classic NWOBHM sound, too.

My 2204 has a an MV that goes whisper quiet.

TayTay on an old 2204, for good measure.

[ame]www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngXBib3d4Q0[/ame]
 

jimmer_5

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Having board-mounted pots is ok (chassis-mount would be easier for service/replacement), since pots don't make heat.

Yeah. The lessor evil then the two others. Pots are pretty stable beasts and usually clean up pretty well.

The switch to on board pots came as soon as you saw horizontally mounted jacks on 86 JCM's They are mounted that way because they are on the board (and of course it's cheaper for the machine to make) My Studio 15 has this too. Thank god the tubes are chassis mounted. Otherwise I would not own the amp.

That said, because the input jack was board mounted it was nearly impossible to find a replacement for it. Hence another problem when part supplies dry up with these older amps.. Board mounted stuff requires exact replacements while chassis mounted stuff does not..

But the big picture is with the JMP/JCM you are left with an amp that is very simple and easy to service.. Hence a life long friend that needs no replacement.

Great to know - thanks! How thick/robust are the boards on the Jubilees? I'd eventually like to have both a 50 watt Jube and a 50 watt JCM800, but I would prefer the extra gain and channel switching of the Jube.
 

dwk302

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The reissue Jubs don't sound the same as the originals to me. They seem to have less bite and more fizz. I have a 50w '83 JCM800 2x12 vertical input that sounds like a punch to the face! Low input sounds great. I'm running mine with 6550s.
 

babatube

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in the video the reissue sounds more fizzy with less balls.
i found the same thing with the jcm800 reissue they sound fizzy.
they just don't growl like the old ones.
might be tubes but i guess this is more related to a cheaper OT.
i took no chances and built meself a 2204 replica and it sure does sound like an original:dude:
 

50WPLEXI

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JCM no doubt about it. Like a dumbass I sold mine, stupid move.
 

LPV

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Kind of silly to choose an amp like this don't ya think ? Those are 2 very different amps. I love them both but one isn't a substitute for the other. You really have to play them. I only have 3 amps now. All in the Marshall camp. My main amp will always be my 2555 that I bought in november of '87. But my 2204 was a fantastic amp too. So right now my main swiss army knife is my Traynor that I completely reworked to be a 1986/1987 plexi hybrid with a Merren OT and LarMar. That amp is amazing.

But I'm a pentatonic simpleton and that Jubillee with my 412 loaded with v30's is the sound of the 80's. I love it. Its just got a thick dripping spongy midrange that my '83 2204 didn't (at least mine didn't) have. So you need to try them - then buy both :)

If you want a jube too and can't get the scratch together just wait for the reissues to hit the used market. These things are bought by guys with GAS who flip them all the time. You will be able to get a great amp at about 60% retail in a few months.
 

thegaindeli

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Reissue amplifiers, along with most any post 2006 constructed electronics device is constructed using lead-free (RoHS) solder. This stuff is good for nothing! It has zero pliability, excessive reaction to temperature changes, poor adhering properties, requires excessive heat to flow (which damages components), and it is unstable.

I was talking with the former head of TC Electronic Service Denmark who was repairing a TC1210 Chorus about issues concerning lead-free (RoHS) solder. He said to me; "Once the solder material becomes unstable, there is no stopping the process. New surface sealers (conformal coatings) have helped mitigate the process, but is a temporary solution at best. Expect an 8 to 10 year life span out of most RoHS constructed products, maybe more, often less..."

I did some research, and discovered that back when solder was first being developed, lead was added for the specific purpose of stabilizing the material. They call this destabilization process "tin whiskers". It's an interesting read...

Hard-Won Knowledge Mitigates Effects Of Tin Whiskers | Components content from Electronic Design

The reason for banning the use of lead solder in the UK was purely political. The compounds used to construct a simple alkaline battery are infinitely more toxic to the environment compared to lead solder. America has not banned the use of lead solder yet, but if you want to sell products abroad, you must adhere to the RoHS directive.
 

roeg

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Hands down JCM.If you need more gain,pedal it.
 

thegaindeli

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Here's the article I was referring to...

Stubble Trouble

You can rebuild a hand-wired amplifier using leaded solder. With PCB designed amplifiers, you are stuck with the lead-free solder. I totally rebuilt my Cornford RK100 using Kester lead solder. The only remaining RoHS solder is on the back of the pots.

I dig the JCM, but I just love the (Tom Scholtz) LED clipping option of the Jubilee! You can turn the LED's off, for valve only clipping. :dude:
 

frankv

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Reissue amplifiers, along with most any post 2006 constructed electronics device is constructed using lead-free (RoHS) solder. This stuff is good for nothing! It has zero pliability, excessive reaction to temperature changes, poor adhering properties, requires excessive heat to flow (which damages components), and it is unstable.

I was talking with the former head of TC Electronic Service Denmark who was repairing a TC1210 Chorus about issues concerning lead-free (RoHS) solder. He said to me; "Once the solder material becomes unstable, there is no stopping the process. New surface sealers (conformal coatings) have helped mitigate the process, but is a temporary solution at best. Expect an 8 to 10 year life span out of most RoHS constructed products, maybe more, often less..."

I did some research, and discovered that back when solder was first being developed, lead was added for the specific purpose of stabilizing the material. They call this destabilization process "tin whiskers". It's an interesting read...

Hard-Won Knowledge Mitigates Effects Of Tin Whiskers | Components content from Electronic Design

The reason for banning the use of lead solder in the UK was purely political. The compounds used to construct a simple alkaline battery are infinitely more toxic to the environment compared to lead solder. America has not banned the use of lead solder yet, but if you want to sell products abroad, you must adhere to the RoHS directive.


Great post brother. This is why I said many posts back that the circuit boards used today are one time solder boards.. After that you can forget it. Thanks for giving the technical back ground on why.
 

kevinpaul

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The old one made ? Avoid Chinese made electric stuff. That 1983 is kinda long in the tooth.
I would skip and keep looking.
 

CRobbins

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Here's a JCM 800 I once owned.
It was a great sounding amp. I unfortunately
had to sell it.:dude::dude:

 

babatube

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Here's the article I was referring to...

Stubble Trouble

You can rebuild a hand-wired amplifier using leaded solder. With PCB designed amplifiers, you are stuck with the lead-free solder. I totally rebuilt my Cornford RK100 using Kester lead solder. The only remaining RoHS solder is on the back of the pots.

I dig the JCM, but I just love the (Tom Scholtz) LED clipping option of the Jubilee! You can turn the LED's off, for valve only clipping. :dude:

i contribute it more to the inferior transformers.
i doubt lead free solder will effect the sound in a noticeable level.
ENGL amps are pure PCB and are reliable tone monsters.
the more i do DIY electronics i tend to find the whole components/solder type myths to be untrue.
i think a good design with quality transformers will make a good tube amp.
in this case i firmly believe it is low quality transformer the marshall use on the reissues that make them sound fizzy.
let the ****storm begin!!:)
 

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