1979 Les Paul Custom neck

kakao

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:)

Looks like it was a maple neck on models made in 1979 or thereabout.

I was always wondering what is the difference between mahogany and maple necks on LPC's of that era?

:wow:
 

EVH9442

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Nothing but two syllables. Maple or Mahogany used in a NECK, (notice I didn't say body)
will feel no different from one another once coated with some thick 'norlin lacquer. No sound difference either. This tonal wood shit is so laughable, "Hey guys, I recently switched my rosewood fretboard to ebony and now I'm getting a much darker tone!" Little things like that (such as the material used in a neck) will not make any difference in the sound of an electric guitar. However I can very much understand why one would like a different type of wood for cosmetic reasons, or possibly from the manufacturers perspective; to save money. :hippie:

HOWEVER, I'm no Les Paul expert, so Gibson possibly could have crafted the maple necks slightly different then say, a mahogany neck back then. But, if both necks are identical in shape and size, there will be no difference AFTER lacquer.

Now watch the in-denial tone wood freaks give me hell :cool2:
 

BuzzHaze

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I believe the laminated maple neck to be stronger but some may argue. I have both and doubt I could tell the difference short of the thickness differences. I suppose a laminated maple neck may weigh more than a mahogany neck, but then again it depends on the density of the mahogany used. ...in other words, I duinno :laugh2:
 

kakao

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Thank you guys.

Is it possible for a 1979 Custom to come with a TP6 tail piece from the factory and with the pictured hard case?

 

ARandall

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Despite the uniformed views above, wood does make a difference. People who actually build guitars and are experienced in these matter know this.....the monkeys who simply perpetuate myth will say otherwise.

The issue soundwise is whether you can manage to isolate what part of the guitar is contributing what to the final tone. This is where problems arise.......as each piece of wood is different to each other you can only give a general tonal description as to how an average piece of x wood will sound like compared with another species. The neck is a very important part of the whole picture.....having changed necks amongst many fender strats over the years I can quite comfortably say that the profile as well as the wood will make a difference to how the guitar reacts and sounds.......but it is subtle of course - the pickups have their own tone which will sound similar from guitar to guitar.

Maple is quite hard as a wood. Generally I'd say the tone of s mapleneck would be harder and much more biting than mahogany.....or more present.

The TP 6 is very common and could well have come from that era. I'm not sure on the case, but it does look similar to my 80 Deluxe case so its also possible to be original.
 

ZWILDZR1

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Not sure about the TP6. When I bought my 79 Custom back in 1979 the only guitars I saw with that adjustable bridge were the Anniversary models that were at the store. The case my 79 Natural Custom came in was a black outside with the Gibson name in silver on the lower back corner of the top. The lining was a more reddish fuzzy material and it had one pad on the lid that when closed was just below the stop bar area of the guitar. The latches were similar except for the lock was now incorporated into a unit that had a slide button that released the lock. I think the one you have pictured is from around the early to mid 70's. I always thought it was kind of dumb how they would make you pay extra for the case the guitar was shipped in.

Here is a picture of how my 79 case looked like with the spring latch key lock. This one has a blue interior but mine was the same material just in red. The salesman brought it out still in the shipping carton and opened it in front of me so I know for sure this is the case it was shipped in.

 

kakao

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Not sure if all models of that year came in the same type of case however I bought a brand new LP Standard in 1979, in London GB. It came with the 'plastic' chainsaw case which I liked very much.
 

ZWILDZR1

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I found one that is just like what mine came in. It didn't have the extra padding under the front of the body like the blue one and the handle is the same also. You can see there were some variations in the cases. The chainsaw cases were used for some but also the more traditional style case also for the period. I always wanted a purple lined case from the early to mid 70's. The silver Gibson name wore of mine and I was pretty careful with both the guitar and the case.

 

Oranjeaap

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Thank you guys.

Is it possible for a 1979 Custom to come with a TP6 tail piece from the factory and with the pictured hard case?

Yes I think they can both be original to the guitar.

About the maple neck, its gonna sounds different than a les paul with a mahogany neck. I dont know much about tone woods so I cant tell you exactly what difference you should expect to hear.

I can say for sure maple necks are stronger than mahogany. Also, a 79 will have a volute, reducing the chance on a crack/break.
 

Lucidsounds

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I once asked the guys about this on the Norlin forum and the consensus was they preferred maple both for durability (ie resistance to headstock breaks) and tone (slightly brighter snappier tone).

I have a 74 (mahogany) and an 80 (maple). The 80 is brighter for sure, but it also has Shaw pups so how much of it is down to those I dunno. The 74 sounds more like the classic Les Paul tone that I am familiar with, but both are beautiful instruments.
 

audiocheck

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My '79 was built in Nashville and came with Standard stop bar tail piece and a Protector Gen 2 case (3 plastic latches). If the pictured LP was built in Kalamazoo, that could explain the differences.
 

hrfdez

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Despite the uniformed views above, wood does make a difference. People who actually build guitars and are experienced in these matter know this.....the monkeys who simply perpetuate myth will say otherwise.

The issue soundwise is whether you can manage to isolate what part of the guitar is contributing what to the final tone. This is where problems arise.......as each piece of wood is different to each other you can only give a general tonal description as to how an average piece of x wood will sound like compared with another species. The neck is a very important part of the whole picture.....having changed necks amongst many fender strats over the years I can quite comfortably say that the profile as well as the wood will make a difference to how the guitar reacts and sounds.......but it is subtle of course - the pickups have their own tone which will sound similar from guitar to guitar.

Maple is quite hard as a wood. Generally I'd say the tone of s mapleneck would be harder and much more biting than mahogany.....or more present.

The TP 6 is very common and could well have come from that era. I'm not sure on the case, but it does look similar to my 80 Deluxe case so its also possible to be original.

Although your post was kind of informative, the statement in bold says a lot about you, sorry but that was uncalled for IMO.:dunno:
 

JM2112

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The three piece maple neck should be very strong. Once you set your truss rod, you'll likely never have to touch it again unless you live in a jungle or a desert.

Sweet looking guitar, too, enjoy it!!! :thumb:
 

HardCore Troubadour

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you are in Australia, correct?

If you are going to pay that, you can find one closer to you...no reason to purchase (this in in USA) for this price and take the shipping chance IMO.

still...too much for this guitar.
 

kakao

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you are in Australia, correct?

If you are going to pay that, you can find one closer to you...no reason to purchase (this in in USA) for this price and take the shipping chance IMO.

still...too much for this guitar.

Yep, I'm an Aussie.

Such guitar would be close to $5,000 here.

I have purchased numerous guitars and amps from US without any issue.

Do you think $2,500 would be a good deal for this geetar, or wait for another one (I prefer black, but this looks nice too).

:wow:
 

xadamx

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That tailpiece is not uncommon on '79's, at least the ones for sale on eBay. That guitar looks sweet...I'm in the market for a Norlin Tobacco Burst Custom, or Artisan. I think $2500 is a pretty fair price for the age and condition, it's in great shape!
 

DanL

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Nothing but two syllables. Maple or Mahogany used in a NECK, (notice I didn't say body)
will feel no different from one another once coated with some thick 'norlin lacquer. No sound difference either. This tonal wood shit is so laughable, "Hey guys, I recently switched my rosewood fretboard to ebony and now I'm getting a much darker tone!" ...

HOWEVER, I'm no Les Paul expert.....

Now watch the in-denial tone wood freaks give me hell :cool2:
First of all, tone woods do make a difference. According to your theory, you could make the neck out of aluminum and it would sound the exact same. I'm not sure if some of you guys aren't versed in logic or if you simply don't consider counter-examples before making such audacious claims.

Secondly, ebony has a brighter, sharper tone than rosewood so your example was just flat out bogus.

Thirdly, as you said, you are no Les Paul expert, so leave the "fact" sharing and scrutiny to someone who is not only qualified, but also has the confidence to stand behind their statement with evidence.

Maple is cheaper than mahogany, but hey, I won't take your Koolaid away. :laugh2:
 

ARandall

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Although your post was kind of informative, the statement in bold says a lot about you, sorry but that was uncalled for IMO.:dunno:
Sorry if it seems harsh to you, but as other posters have since explained it is quite simply a view of no logic at all, and the original view was expressed just as strongly.
I feel it my obligation to correct such uniformed views......being an amateur luthier myself I have dabbled in construction and wood types and am slowly becoming more aware of wood as a strong factor in a great toned instrument.
 

RRfireblade

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Wood choice definitely makes difference, doesn't mean there are any guaranteed results or that one is better than the other.

A laminated maple neck will be stronger than a baseball bat so yea, you have that going for you too.

Other than that it is an LP so it can be virtually anything until you play it and find out.

:)
 




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