1975 Gibson Les Paul Deluxe Gold Top

ARandall

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2012
Messages
16,478
Reaction score
14,090
Well no mater how thin the glue is, it still creates a void = less resonance
Man, its better if you don't know things and just make wild guesses simply to stay silent - that way you don't prove just how much you don't know to everybody.

Its proven time and time again that not only is glue joint mechanically stronger and more rigid than the surrounding wood fibres, but that glues occupy the pore spaces more than the interface; that clamping as part of a joint process forces the glue into said gaps; a well jointed pair of wood slabs do not have voids, and glues tend to pull the sides together as they dry.

Please cease to pollute this thread with your nonsense.
 

msalama

Senior Member
Joined
May 6, 2021
Messages
333
Reaction score
321
Your worrying is nonsensical, because as stated already, a proper glue joint is harder, structurally stronger and more rigid than the wood surrounding it. And how is such a "void", as you put it, harmful anyway? Every Fender (kind of) has one in the neck-body junction and they resonate just as well as anything.
 
Last edited:

ARandall

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2012
Messages
16,478
Reaction score
14,090
Mark me down as one of the 'worriers'. But my original post was about my surprise that Gibson would do such a thing.
Surprise at a glue joint??? Why?
I mean your picture also showed the pancake stripe right down the length of the body.

Gibsons are made from at minimum 10 pieces of wood - you guessed it.....glued together. And thats the vintage style Les Paul. The Norlin construction version (from mid 69) is at minimum 14!!!
So why anyone thinks having glued bits of wood in a Les Paul guitar is a surprise is beyond sense and reason. And even beyond that, why say a 15th or 16th bit is suddenly going to be the straw that broke the camel's back.

But just so you can learn rather than spout nonsense, laminates or multipice construction is stronger and more dimensionally stable than single pieces. Its why the Norlin era construction went to the pancake body and the 3 piece neck in the first place.
Then there are guitars like ES335's - these come with the top/sides and back being a thin 3-ply maple/poplar/maple laminate as its stronger than a single bit of wood at the same dimension.
 

rogue3

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2017
Messages
4,326
Reaction score
5,883
Without actually hearing the instrument plugged in...well, this is just a cosmetic observation/criticism at best.An oddity. For all we know ,that beast rings like a bell.Or the wood may be dead .The truth is somewhere in between,i'll wager.

Greeny was in a car accident with Gary Moore. Apparently,it was in so many pieces,including a headstock break,and subsequent re-attachment(with glue).So i've read,and,is well documented. No complaints about the way it sounds, apparently.Or looks.Or worth(well, Kirk didn't complain!).

After looking at the ad deftone posted(thanks), i would say it is a nice piece of history.Unmolested,except for the brass bridge, Grovers,and wear and tear, with a very intriquing variation in the pancake. Heavily giged and loved.I'll bet that brass bridge and Grovers does help it ring like a bell.

The proof is in plugging in.No idea what is a good price.Norlins are changing.Good on the owner for posting the body shot, though.Looks very nice. That block insert is an amazing identifier.Like a fingerprint.

If the op wants to use empirical logic on the glue joint,then use the same on a dried out, 46 year old piece of dense old growth Central American Mahogany. Gotta be good,right?( in truth, it could be anywhere on the spectrum).But again,i'll wager it does sound very nice,by the way it has been played.That i can see.
 

mudface

Boo Bee
Double Platinum Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2016
Messages
11,555
Reaction score
35,211
The inner piece of mahogany is more likely a three piece or an off center two piece.... the seam running from north/south or neck to bottom....the waist cut was deep enough to expose the other half leaving a small square plug like piece.... which it is not. Common on multi piece bodies, though not common on pancake Norlin bodies as both halves have mostly been solid one piece.

The pancake body can have 5 layers.

1)..Mahogany

2)..Maple thin piece.

3)..Mahogany

4)..Another thin piece of Maple

5)..Then the Maple cap

Though not all pancake construction had the thin maple between the maple cap and inner mahogany.... tho many do.

This method of construction was expensive and time consuming, not the cost saving or corner cutting process that many like to argue.

It worked very well and many players had no problem with performing and recording with them. Thin Lizzy comes to mind.
 

Prometheus

Senior Member
Joined
May 22, 2012
Messages
2,260
Reaction score
3,452
Gibsons are made from at minimum 10 pieces of wood - you guessed it.....glued together. And thats the vintage style Les Paul. The Norlin construction version (from mid 69) is at minimum 14!!!

10? Care to elaborate? Let's say 2pc or 3pc hog body, 2pc maple cap, 1 hog neck, and veneer on the headstock lands at 7?

Right, forgot about wings on the headstock, so 9?
 

mudface

Boo Bee
Double Platinum Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2016
Messages
11,555
Reaction score
35,211
10? Care to elaborate? Let's say 2pc or 3pc hog body, 2pc maple cap, 1 hog neck, and veneer on the headstock lands at 7?

Right, forgot about wings on the headstock, so 9?

Fretboard and maple strip to hold the truss rod in place under the fretboard.
 
Last edited:

1981 LPC

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2010
Messages
2,474
Reaction score
1,979
Greeny was in a car accident with Gary Moore. Apparently,it was in so many pieces,including a headstock break,and subsequent re-attachment(with glue).So i've read,and,is well documented. No complaints about the way it sounds, apparently.Or looks.Or worth(well, Kirk didn't complain!).
If I'm not mistaken, Peter Green said it sounded better after the headstock break repair. I guess he would know.
 

ARandall

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2012
Messages
16,478
Reaction score
14,090
^ On the subject of 'pieces'.....
I have a scratch build that is based on an ES 347....and odd model from the late 70's/early 80's mainly distinguishable by the huge bridge/tailpiece gap.
Ok so this guitar's neck is actually pretty cobbled together. When building guitars the typical neck blank you buy from a luthier supplier for a set neck is actually enough to comfortably make 2 Gibson style necks 'top and tailed' from the blank. Some blanks also have enough dimension for you to patch together a 3rd neck - but its not pretty.
This guitar has a 3 piece black korina stock that we are working from. But its to thin for the 17degree headstock angle so there is a scarf joint. 6 pieces so far.
Its also too short for the Gibson headstock so there is a second cut halfway down the headstock....9 pieces now...plus the wings makes 11.
Its also too thin for the heel/tenon so another bit of the 3 ply korina is grafted on there......14 bits total.
Then there is a heel cap.....15.

Damn nice guitar to play and is a bit of a screamer too (although the fitted Tom Holmes humbuckers help a bit there I'm sure).

Moral of the story - don't count the pieces. its in no way a tonal determinant.

@HardCore Troubadour - who do we think has 'returned'
 

ARandall

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2012
Messages
16,478
Reaction score
14,090
Those were the key elements from the start
 

Daniel.S

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2018
Messages
838
Reaction score
1,089
I thought everything was just put together with hopes and dreams. :doh:
 

Jennysan

Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
52
Reaction score
146
What I was trying to say, however poorly, was that it seemed to me that one solid piece of wood, would have more resonance than multiple pieces glued together. Talking about solid body LP's and not any other model. And my surprise that Gibson did this. Anyway this is a tired thread. Sorry I started it. Nuff Said..
 

Latest Threads



Top