1974 Les Paul truss rod cover

wiltel24

Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2013
Messages
68
Reaction score
11
Picture 8.jpg

Question for any and all '74 Standard experts. Does this truss rod cover look authentic, meaning it is truly from a 1974 Les Paul Standard? The guitar has the full size t-top pups and everything else seems to be ok from what I know, but curious if it was a deluxe model that was rerouted or not. How can I tell?

Thanks.
 

Kris Ford

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2011
Messages
4,751
Reaction score
4,123
View attachment 150612

Question for any and all '74 Standard experts. Does this truss rod cover look authentic, meaning it is truly from a 1974 Les Paul Standard? The guitar has the full size t-top pups and everything else seems to be ok from what I know, but curious if it was a deluxe model that was rerouted or not. How can I tell?

Thanks.

YES
That is what is known as the "Small script" Standard, and not a very common one at that.
It's the real deal.:thumb:
But I would ask for a pic of the routes just to be sure.
 

wiltel24

Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2013
Messages
68
Reaction score
11
Thanks, Kris. So what do I look for as far as rerouting goes? Also, what is the going rate for a 74 these days? This one suffered the dreaded neck break, but was repaired by professional luthier back in the late 70's.
 

Kris Ford

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2011
Messages
4,751
Reaction score
4,123
Thanks, Kris. So what do I look for as far as rerouting goes? Also, what is the going rate for a 74 these days? This one suffered the dreaded neck break, but was repaired by professional luthier back in the late 70's.

A factory route will look like a new one would with the square with ears on the corner, and a uniform shape..A routed Deluxe will be very easy to spot, there will be "ears" to mount the pickup ring added..if you aren't sure, get a pic and I could tell you for sure.
As far as value, see them on eBay go for anywhere from 2100ish and up..I saw one for $6495, which is very optimistic to say the least..
 

Xrun Morzov

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2015
Messages
642
Reaction score
316
I one one '74 Standard. Its quite a rare guitar as only 2000-something were produced this year and in 75 they changed to maple necks.
I wouldn't judge by truss rod cover as its easily replaceable. Better pull the pups out and see the cavities. The neck break should significantly lower the price.
If a '74 in nice shape can get $4000, I'd say the fair price for the repaired one should be no more than $2500.
BTW the stock pickups on those are amazing for old school rock!
 

wiltel24

Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2013
Messages
68
Reaction score
11
I one one '74 Standard. Its quite a rare guitar as only 2000-something were produced this year and in 75 they changed to maple necks.
I wouldn't judge by truss rod cover as its easily replaceable. Better pull the pups out and see the cavities. The neck break should significantly lower the price.
If a '74 in nice shape can get $4000, I'd say the fair price for the repaired one should be no more than $2500.
BTW the stock pickups on those are amazing for old school rock!

Kind of what I figured on the price. Funny thing is, a highly respected guitar tech (that shall remain nameless) I asked about the neck breakage issue said this era Les Paul guitar actually breaks pretty easily, and that repairing and gluing them correctly back together makes them stronger.
 

HardCore Troubadour

V.I.P. Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2012
Messages
12,397
Reaction score
13,912
lol....lots more to it being a 74 than just the small script logo OP.

pics and plenty of them......

price will depend on actual date, originality of hardware, finish, repair, routes etc. etc.


anything other numbers here are just like pissing in the ocean.
 

Mayuiers

V.I.P. Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2011
Messages
828
Reaction score
609
Kind of what I figured on the price. Funny thing is, a highly respected guitar tech (that shall remain nameless) I asked about the neck breakage issue said this era Les Paul guitar actually breaks pretty easily, and that repairing and gluing them correctly back together makes them stronger.

I am also a luthier (albeit, part time). There's nothing about the necks on Norlin Les Pauls that make them more susceptible to breakage. If anything, they should be ever so slightly stronger compared to Les Pauls of other eras.

Except for the years of '68 thru '82-ish where the headstocks were angled at 14 degrees, Gibson used a 17 degree headstock angle. From an engineering standpoint the relatively flatter headstock angle of 14 degrees should result in less force being placed on the neck if a fall should happen, but in reality even a shallow fall can still create more than enough force to snap the neck.

Gibson tried adding volutes of varying sizes to strengthen the neck where it transitions into the headstock, but their efforts didn't have much of an effect.

Whether we're talking about Gibsons, Martins, or any other brand, it's simply in the nature of ALL angled headstocks to be prone to catastrophic failure following a fall.

The only mass manufactured guitar necks that won't break are the old aluminum Kramers and Travis Beans. I've seen photos of those necks placed between two chairs with a grown man standing on them!!
 

chasenblues

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2007
Messages
21,324
Reaction score
32,299
The only mass manufactured guitar necks that won't break are the old aluminum Kramers and Travis Beans. I've seen photos of those necks placed between two chairs with a grown man standing on them!!

Fender did that before they did..:naughty:

images

imgext.php
 

Mayuiers

V.I.P. Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2011
Messages
828
Reaction score
609
Very very cool. I've never seen those photos before.

Thanks for sharing !!
 

moreles

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2011
Messages
5,335
Reaction score
4,146
Neck breakage is old territory on the LPF. Most of us find that well-repaired neck cracks are stable and have no audible effect. Many can indeed be stronger than the original build. But -- and it's a bit but -- a neck break does cause diminished value in the marketplace and so the seller, and not the buyer, should take the "hit" on that. We would say the same thing about a major crack in a guitar top. And that's fair. Broken-and-fixed, for any object of value, is cause for major devaluation in price, though not necessarily in use. It is a major mistake to pay full freight for an instrument that has been broken in this manner.
 

Six Gun

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2012
Messages
1,024
Reaction score
1,479
That Fender Ad the guy is standing on an Ash Body Lap Steel Guitar. The Ash is like baseball bat wood. The Alder is much softer and not as strong. I have a 56 with Ash body in the blonde translucent finish.
 

Latest Threads



Top