1969 Tele Thinline build

fatdaddypreacher

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i use their standard two way truss rods, but generally carve a volute on mine. i've only built one without a volute, but it doesn't seem that intrusive to me on the headstock. thanks.
 

pshupe

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i use their standard two way truss rods, but generally carve a volute on mine. i've only built one without a volute, but it doesn't seem that intrusive to me on the headstock. thanks.
Yeah, I might have to look at putting in a volute. I'm just not liking this rod for this application. I might switch to the LMII rods. They are double the price but seem to be much simpler to install with the right dimensions.

Regards Peter.
 

fatdaddypreacher

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the standard sm hot rods require a 7/16" deep channel with very little, very very little modification for the adjustment end. isn't a standard lp single action channel 1/2" deep at the headstock, plus the relief for the nut access?
 

LtDave32

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Good afternoon everyone. I hope we are all getting lots of building done while in isolation. I am still working but find myself with a little extra time as I am not spending 4 hrs a day commuting. :dude:

A friend of mine owns a 1969 Tele thinline, which I had a chance to play the other month, pre-COVID. I'm also working on some custom bodies and necks for another Luthier friend of mine who has a line of Tele "esque" builds. I'm just finishing his CAM files and would like to build a test body for the guitar noted above.

Calling LTDave32!!!!

The body is pretty much complete but it is not a thinline, so I will be hogging out a good portion and adding an f hole. This could take me a long time to finish as I am pretty busy with work and have a lot of other guitar , and not, related things going on. But that is not new. I also cut down a large Ash tree about 7 yrs ago and slabbed it up and it has been stickered and air drying since. I've cut a lot of it up for coffee table tops and charcuterie boards but made sure to save a bunch of the nicest pieces for one piece bodies. This is white ash so makes sense to do a completely chambered body.

So here is some of the wood. I'll post them as thumbnails. The slabs are quite large and I have cut them down but only planed the one -
View attachment 463866 View attachment 463862 View attachment 463865 View attachment 463864

and a charcuterie board for my better half. ;-)
View attachment 463863

It's funny the one piece almost looks like korina. I have not weighed it yet but will do that when I get a square piece that I can easily measure.

Cheers Peter.
I didn't see you flag me until now, Peter. ;)

Build them just like a Ric. Hog them out with forstners, rout smooth, leave a 3/4" surface all around for the back to glue on to. Some of them Thinlines have a center block; just don't rout that part. Flip them over and rout the pups in the CB just like any other tele..
 

LtDave32

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I see. Yeah you would want that for a Bigsby. I think my Ash is quite heavy but I have not weighed it yet. I was trying to lighten it up as much as possible.




Ah - I did not know that. It's funny because I noticed that in one of the pics I downloaded. Like a Rickenbacker. I like that idea and I think I will revise my drawings. Thanks.

Cheers Peter.

PS - how would they do the wire channel? It would have to be quite deep to hit the pup route if they routed it from the back and it looks too long to drill? Do you know the thickness of the body and bottom cap?
Did not see this.

Yep, yep and yep.

Guitars are a hair over 1 3/4, so make the body 1 5/8 and the cap 1/4 ought to do.

On wire channels.. anything that works, is what I say.

On Truss rods.. I'm currently working on a way to do a 3/8 dual-adj rod (allparts, LMI) so it adjusts from the headstock on a separate-fretboard neck. little less tall than 7/16 rods..

Hollowing out a 3/8 walnut dowel , installing it like a skunkstripe neck, adjustment through the hole. I'm going to do a thread on it if it works well..
 

valvetoneman

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I used an Allen key adjuster which is only 1/4 inch wide with a 6mm wide rod, the adjuster hole doesn't have to be big

The other way of doing it would be to angle the channel slightly

I'll do a dummy run on scrap first to see how it'll work out
 

valvetoneman

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One other thought was flip the 2 way over with the flat part down because you're putting a strip over the top it'll work the same in principle

That'll bring the adjuster up alot higher
 

LtDave32

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Trouble is, making sure the hole doesn't wipe out the top of the fretboard area behind the nut. If you use a plug to make it look like the originals, it's a 3/8 hole. That gives you very little room in the "scoop" area.

Angling the drill hole by a degree ain't a bad idea.

of course, this is for a separate-fretboard neck.

On a one-piece, you have to rig up a drill jig to hold an extra-long bit at 3 degrees. I've got a how-to thread somewhere..
 

LtDave32

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Yeah, I might have to look at putting in a volute. I'm just not liking this rod for this application. I might switch to the LMII rods. They are double the price but seem to be much simpler to install with the right dimensions.

Regards Peter.
Peter, the allparts rods are exactly the same as the LMI rods. I have both on the bench right now. no diff.

The allparts rods are cheaper in price, same exact construction, 3/8 depth.
 

pshupe

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I used an Allen key adjuster which is only 1/4 inch wide with a 6mm wide rod, the adjuster hole doesn't have to be big

The other way of doing it would be to angle the channel slightly

I'll do a dummy run on scrap first to see how it'll work out
Yeah - The low profile rod adjuster is 9mm wide. Behind the adjuster is 7.35mm and the rod is 6.35mm (1/4"). That's why I have 3 different routes that are different dpeths and widths.
Capture.JPG


You must be talking about the hot rod truss rod.

The low profile rod only has a 4mm hex head option. I also have the tool to drill for the adjuster. It works OK for the angled head stock I just find it has to go really deep into the channel so the adjuster sits just behind the veneer. I was trying to use a 2 screw typ truss rod cover and unless I make the veneer thicker and put a sliver over top of the adjuster there isn't much meat to screw into and the screw hits the adjuster even if it's short. Another thing I do not like about this rod for this application. I think I just have to use different rods for angled head stocks.

As I said I think I will flip these around and use the rest of mine for Fender style necks. I could put a sliver over top of them as well, which should be fine.
Capture.JPG


Cheers Peter.
 

pshupe

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One other thought was flip the 2 way over with the flat part down because you're putting a strip over the top it'll work the same in principle

That'll bring the adjuster up alot higher
I have thought of that but these rods are U shaped on the bottom, which isn't a big deal, I guess.. A strip on top would be necessary to bring the adjuster under the fret board. You'd also have to remember that the adjustment is backwards on that guitar, which just doesn't seem like a good idea to me. Or it at least leaves me thinking I'd rather not bother.

Cheers Peter.
 

pshupe

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Trouble is, making sure the hole doesn't wipe out the top of the fretboard area behind the nut. If you use a plug to make it look like the originals, it's a 3/8 hole. That gives you very little room in the "scoop" area.

Angling the drill hole by a degree ain't a bad idea.

of course, this is for a separate-fretboard neck.

On a one-piece, you have to rig up a drill jig to hold an extra-long bit at 3 degrees. I've got a how-to thread somewhere..
I would like to try a one piece neck. I haven't decided whether it will be on this build though. Yeah, I've seen that thread and I will search it out when I do up my drawings. I might fake the head stock plug and put in the skunk stripe and use the backwards low profile rod. Probably go with a rosewood or ziricote board for this one but I will make another at some point. Thanks for the help.

Cheers Peter.
 

LtDave32

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I would like to try a one piece neck. I haven't decided whether it will be on this build though. Yeah, I've seen that thread and I will search it out when I do up my drawings. I might fake the head stock plug and put in the skunk stripe and use the backwards low profile rod. Probably go with a rosewood or ziricote board for this one but I will make another at some point. Thanks for the help.

Cheers Peter.
Make a drill jig with a 3/8 hole and shave off 3 degrees from the bottom.

Make a routing jig with a curve that's .555 high in the center. It's in that thread somewhere..
 

pshupe

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I had a couple minutes for this build this afternoon. I'm thinking of losing the pickguard and just going with the one piece ash body. I'll add a control cavity opening on the back with cover. I'm thinking two piece walnut back plate with a multilaminate maple walnut neck. Possibly a roasted birdseye maple fret board.

Updated CAD plan -
CAD04.JPG


Updated Fusion body model for CAM -
Fusion-01.JPG


I've got all the parts in hand now so just have to get some time to do some CNC work.

Cheers Peter.
 
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pshupe

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A quick update on this build. I've revised my plan a bit as noted above. I'm also adding some black walnut accents to this build. I'm thinking of a two piece black walnut back plate, black walnut body binding on the top and a black walnut bound f hole.

Here are some images -

front -
Telecaster_69_thinline_render01.jpg


and back -
Telecaster_69_thinline_render02.jpg


I've picked a chunk of ash and marked out a body outline
IMG_0274.JPG


onto the jointer -
IMG_0275.JPG


thickness planed -
IMG_0278.JPG


I really like this ash, it is definitely white and very clear. On to the CNC machine and indexing holes drilled in both sides so I can flip it back and forth and do all the necessary operations with it exactly line up.
IMG_0281.JPG


Cheers Peter.
 

pshupe

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Toying with the idea of cutting the f hole as a inlay inside a larger route in the body and then cutting the shape from the middle and routing from the back. As well as the same thing for the top binding. I will cut a 3/8" strip of walnut and inlay it in the body prior to cutting out the shape. It may be a waste of wood but I can cut control cavity cover and other smaller pieces from the left overs. That will replace my trying to slice a thin piece of walnut and trying to bend it around the shape for binding. It will also be consistent with the other f hole binding and back plate.

cad file -
CAD07.JPG


I've cut the route for the f-hole and sourced a nice piece of walnut the correct size.
IMG_0283.JPG


Cheers Peter.
 

Kennoyce

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Toying with the idea of cutting the f hole as a inlay inside a larger route in the body and then cutting the shape from the middle and routing from the back. As well as the same thing for the top binding. I will cut a 3/8" strip of walnut and inlay it in the body prior to cutting out the shape. It may be a waste of wood but I can cut control cavity cover and other smaller pieces from the left overs. That will replace my trying to slice a thin piece of walnut and trying to bend it around the shape for binding. It will also be consistent with the other f hole binding and back plate.

cad file -
View attachment 483848

I've cut the route for the f-hole and sourced a nice piece of walnut the correct size.
View attachment 483849

Cheers Peter.
I was wondering how you were going to bind the f-hole, this seems like an awesome (and easy to do if you have a cnc) way of doing it!
 

kakerlak

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Running an unbound contrast wood back and a matching thickness+species wood binding on the top is really clever and elegant idea!
 


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