>1 Les Paul: Why?

flamesarewicked

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When I own guitars that overlap.. I tend move the one I care less for.. I can’t imagine wanting a room full of cherry sunburst LPs.. I guess if I were in a big name touring band and I needed identical backups.. no chances of that ever happening. If I get something to add to the stable, I usually go for something that brings something different to the table. Hey, I just made a rhyme lol. I’d like to get a P90 goldtop of some sort or maybe a single cut junior with a P90..that would cover P90 tones. I guess I’m speaking in terms of my current financial means. If I won the lottery, I would buy whatever sparked my interest regardless if I had one or 5 of the same at home.

After much thought, looks like I can’t live without my R9 that I have listed here. If I really wanted to move it I would of priced it to move. I didn’t.. it’s a lot of dough on one chunk of firewood but it’s a spectacular guitar in every way.. may toy with different pickups in it later for shiz and giggles. It would take something incredibly special for it to trump this one..

Part of me does enjoy trying new stuff.. different eras, finishes, models of LPs. I’ll probably always keep a guitar that I can sell or trade to get another.. so many that I would like to try out.. I don’t live in a part of the world where I have access to test drive various stuff.. the local GC has a handful of the current models which is fine if that’s what I wanted.. it’s helped me learn about what I like and don’t like.. nearly every time I’ve lost money on the deal. I tell myself that it’s the price I pay for being more informed lol..

At the very least when it comes to multiple LPs, different colors are usually what I go for..
 

Truth011

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I'll play, like a lot of people here I have bought and sold several reissues over the years trying to find THE ONE. what I have realized is that every guitar sounds a little different. Some play easier, some tops are prettier, some necks more supple, some have better action, better sustain, better pickups, lighter weights.....

On top of that I have found my tastes have changed over time. I used to like wide flamed Lemmon burst tops, now I prefer a tea burst with moderate flame and tight grain or a gold top . I find 8-8.5 lb's to be a good weight. I used to love a chunky neck with a little shoulder ,now I seek out guitars with more of a R0 V2 profile.

The past year I decided to shuffle the deck and settled on my go to Historic makeovers R9 that I bought new in 2010 and sent to Kim for a full makeover, an incredible sounding CC#5 Donna and 2 vintage LP's(1969 BB Custom & 1953/1957 Goldtop Conversion with PAF'S - both 9 lbs even by chance) . Do I need 4 Les Paul's? well no and I have given some thought to going down to 3 but choosing between Donna and the R9 proved to be too painful. Weather you have 20 les pauls or one good one isn't the point. Do you love what you have. I'm not looking anytime soon...... YMMV
 

frozenotter

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The thing I've learned is that regardless of how many guitars and types you have, there is no stopping that one will call you back over all. You can pick and choose all you want but you can't get away from the one that will keep calling you back. For me it's always been and will probably always be my '96 Standard.

 

GT40

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I have my once in a life time les Paul. It was the first one I got and I stopped looking after that.
I enjoy seeing other people's LPs but I have no interest owning another one.
Same thing with my strat.

I take both to shows and each is the backup for the other.
If I ever broke a string on both, I'd have to figure out a five string arrangement on the fly I guess.
 

jwehrman

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I now have two Murphy aged and painted LP's. At the time I could not afford them, nor did I think I would have access to seeing/playing them; that is until my local dealer had a couple come in used. I was hooked, but they sold faster than I was ready. Prior to that, I had a '16 TH and a CC Reeder. Those were my first experiences with reissues and I learned what I liked and didn't. I'm a sucker for Cherry and Lemons only, you can keep all the rest. So to me it only makes sense to have a pair in my favorite colors. But I will not be getting a third of any kind. I have no practical need or use for a third LP. They are expensive and require losses when buying/selling.
 

filtersweep

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An R8- something a bit special.

A Custom Lite- hotter pickups and was cheap- an everyday guitar.

A Tribute with P90s! P90s! P90s!

The real question is why I also own an SG.
 

Mockbel

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My excuse for owning similar guitars was always “different tunings”... now I got the Digitech Drop pedal which is really beautiful.. the “need” for similar guitars has gone but I realized that the “passion” for new guitar has never gone.. I have one Les Paul but this is because they way too expensive here in Egypt so I can’t really afford another good one.. on the other hand I have 4 other superstrats which are somehow very close to each other.. I just like getting more guitars :)
 

asapmaz

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I've been through more LP's than I can remember in my lifetime, Yarons, other replicas, CC's, Braz's, historics, prehistorics, etc.
Right now, I'm down to just one, my all-time #1, a 1997 R8. Even though it's got a top that rivals some uber bursts of the late 50's, it's become and remained my #1 and survived through a lot of LP's due to its tone.
E5D44C6B-B7BA-4290-A8DC-080CAD46A055.jpeg

Looks are nice but I promised myself that any LP that ends up replacing this one has to sound better to my ears, period.
At the end of the day, the pleasure I get from playing it and listening to it definitely outweighs the pleasure of looking at it. Looks fade, tone doesn't. :)
Do I still lust after a lot of new historics? Of course! It's fun to do and gas is inevitable and there are some killer looking Gibby's out there. But then I think to myself, man, even a single second LP is a lot of money that could be put toward something else, vacation, different gear, awesome amps, etc. So, rather than collecting or even having a second LP, I've come to appreciate the one that's survived it all and want to focus more on making music and bonding with it.
If I find an LP that sounds better than my R8, sure, it'll get replaced. But, I'm not actively searching. If I happen to run across one, perfect. All supposed to be fun in the end anyways.
I have the same rule with my Strat.
 

decoy205

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Those late 90s R8s were killer! You should post more pics of that bad boy.

My 2005 R8 is a great guitar. I think I got lucky with it. I played a few in some shops after I got it and mine was still better. I’ve since got a replica that has a way different top and much more custom appointments. It is also a great guitar and sounds more ‘vintage’ to my ears. Definitely different tones but both great.

If I had endless money I’d get more but for now these cover the bases I need. I will say the custom shop has put out some amazing guitars since I got mine in 2008. It’s very tempting!
 

Duane_the_tub

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I've been through more LP's than I can remember in my lifetime, Yarons, other replicas, CC's, Braz's, historics, prehistorics, etc.
Right now, I'm down to just one, my all-time #1, a 1997 R8. Even though it's got a top that rivals some uber bursts of the late 50's, it's become and remained my #1 and survived through a lot of LP's due to its tone.
View attachment 372092
Looks are nice but I promised myself that any LP that ends up replacing this one has to sound better to my ears, period.
At the end of the day, the pleasure I get from playing it and listening to it definitely outweighs the pleasure of looking at it. Looks fade, tone doesn't. :)
Do I still lust after a lot of new historics? Of course! It's fun to do and gas is inevitable and there are some killer looking Gibby's out there. But then I think to myself, man, even a single second LP is a lot of money that could be put toward something else, vacation, different gear, awesome amps, etc. So, rather than collecting or even having a second LP, I've come to appreciate the one that's survived it all and want to focus more on making music and bonding with it.
If I find an LP that sounds better than my R8, sure, it'll get replaced. But, I'm not actively searching. If I happen to run across one, perfect. All supposed to be fun in the end anyways.
I have the same rule with my Strat.
Awesome guitar, Al. Glad that you, like me, found a true keeper.

Funny thing is, you called "dibs" on mine right after I bought it. If I ever do move on from it, you're in for another amazing instrument.
 

goodvibes

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Why? Why would you want to make love to more than one beautiful woman in your lifetime?
 

Marco Giampa

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If you gig or feel like 2 of the same guitars for different tunings or slide for example, then two of the same guitar is alright as long as there different in a way. A guitar can feel the same and play the same, but can look different and sound different and inspire you to play different things, making you use them more
 

Cygnus X-1

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I have 4 LP currently...3 are all R8's, and 2 are both Eb tuned, with the same pickups but different finishes. So I guess in that case I'm guilty of getting one of those for aesthetics. Am I embarrassed by that? Slightly. Am I getting therapy for that? Hell no! Get what you like and what feels good. I am awaiting a Ken Lawerence explorer- that's a different guitar entirely! Except it will have the same pickups as my '80 LPC....oh well.
 

lpfan1980

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I am in the process of ordering another Les Paul, M2M through a dealer. This will be the second Les Paul in my current herd, stable, quiver, whatever you want to call it, though somewhere around #15 in terms of Lesters I have owned in my life. I tend to move on from one when I get another, better one - and my current one is an amazing, once-in-a-lifetime forever guitar, keeper, again whatever your preferred term is. Feels, plays and sounds absolutely incredible. It's perfect.

In picking out the characteristics for the M2M, I find myself going back time and again to my current LP. I want the same neck profile, same weight (or as close as possible), same pickups, same finish. I even thought about just sending my current guitar to Gibson and telling them to replicate it as closely as possible. Which begs a question:

Why?

I feel like I've been conditioned somewhat by all the great collectors and players on here to think that owning more than one LP is justifiable. I also know that if this new guitar is not as good as my current one I'm not going to play it, and will probably end up selling it (presumably at somewhat of a loss). There is actually a pretty good chance of this happening, as I've played hundreds of Les Pauls that were good, even great guitars but not in the same league as my current one (to which I have never found an equal). So I am now asking myself: If you own a Les Paul that is perfect, why buy another one? I've read all these accounts about famous guitarists who owned one LP and use it exclusively on recordings and playing live. More often, they have two (which makes sense if you're a touring/working musician).

My question to the forum is: For those of you who own one amazing, perfect-for-you, keeper Les Paul, why did you get a second (or third, fourth, etc.)? Did you go for different models, or characteristics, on purpose to gain some kind of useful variance among your herd? Obviously, aesthetics are important to many and so different finishes are desirable - one lemon, one cherry, one black, etc. However, if that is not as important to me, does it even make sense to try and add another Les Paul and capture lighting in a bottle twice? Or might it make more sense to purposefully move away from some characteristics in hopes of getting something distinctly different?

Your own experiences and insights would be greatly appreciated!

(Sorry for so many words. Here is a Gabby pic to reward anyone who read this far:)

View attachment 371633
Your lp is awesome. I just bought my first Gibson used .i went to the shop and asked if i could try it out because i love my Epi standard so i fell in love. I scraped up some extra stock money and its mine.Its probably the only Gibson i will Ever own due to the fact im not Bill Gates how ever i want to grab a goldtop or burst Epiphone and have them join my lp family.:)
 

DonP

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7 Gibson LP's. All different IMO, I like variety. No single one is master.
 

eeprete

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I have 7 Gibsons, including three Reissues, a Standard, an ES, and two Studios.

Then I have an Epi Standard and an Epi LP ES-Florentine....

My favorite/go-to's are my Gibson Studio Deluxe and my Epiphone Les Paul ES-Florentine.
 




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