Why Gibson Did Not Get It Right in the Late 60s?

Discussion in 'Vintage Les Pauls' started by zakkrhoads, Sep 13, 2017.

  1. ARandall

    ARandall Senior Member

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    I really do think you need to read up on the history of Gibson - it seems this particular era is something you are wholly ignorant of if you think 1968 was Norlin.
     
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  2. goldtop0

    goldtop0 Senior Member

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    Don't want to derail this thread ....but I'm pretty sure you might know the Beano album got to #6 on the album charts in Britain when it was released in '66 so its impact was immediate there, however I don't think it was a 'hit' in the USA.
    We got airplay of it here in NZ and Aussie but it wasn't a charting album as such in our part of the world. I loved hearing Key To Love whenever it was played on the radio, that searing soaring solo by EC just took me away.
    Some of the black blues artists(mainly in the US) attribute their success to the likes of the Stones, Animals, Cream, Fleetwood Mac, Chicken Shack etc recording their tunes bringing these to an international audience.
    In fact the Brits did a great deal in that regard for a wide spectrum of black(and white) recording artists from the US at the time.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2017
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  3. Thermionik

    Thermionik Not Fade Away Premium Member

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    Some folk use "Norlin Era" to mean "after the resignation of Ted McCarty" to concentrate on Bigsby (McCarty was, by all accounts, a non-playing listener who took on board what players were telling him) and the Stanley Rendell era which seemed to be more about efficiency in the factory. Having said that, there are superb guitars around from the Norlin era too... And it doesn't matter a damn in the long run, when you play those chords or lead lines and the audience claps, ain't many gonna say "Wow, not bad for a Norlin era guitar..."
     
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  4. Kris Ford

    Kris Ford Senior Member

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    The word NORLIN did not exist until 1974...kind of a broad brush stroke.
    You will find ZERO period literature mentioning it until 1975 in fact.
     
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  5. Kris Ford

    Kris Ford Senior Member

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    Has facts, has a couple errors.. '68 was a STANDARD, and had P90s.
     
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  6. chasenblues

    chasenblues Senior Member

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    gibLP68p1.jpg
     
  7. Thermionik

    Thermionik Not Fade Away Premium Member

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    That's why I said "Some folk...", 'cause that don't include me.
    However - good ol' Wiki says "Gibson was owned by the Norlin corporation from 1969 to 1986"... Ecuadorian Company Limited (E.C.L.) acquired a majority of shares of Chicago Musical Instruments (CMI), and the two companies merged in July of 1969, and it was renamed Norlin after Norton Stevens of ECL and Arnold Berlin of CMI...
     
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  8. Kris Ford

    Kris Ford Senior Member

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    Yep, I knew what you meant, but Wiki also says the merger is '74.
    "In 1969, Gibson's parent company (Chicago Musical Instruments) was taken over by the conglomerate ECL. Gibson remained under the control of CMI until 1974 when it became a subsidiary of Norlin Musical Instruments."
     
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  9. Thermionik

    Thermionik Not Fade Away Premium Member

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    I
    haz
    a confusion.

    Someone must have the definitive skinny on tis, surely :jb:
     
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  10. Kris Ford

    Kris Ford Senior Member

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  11. Kris Ford

    Kris Ford Senior Member

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    A clue perhaps?

    "Michael Nugent is the former president of Norlin Corporation. He joined the company when it was still Chicago Musical Instrument Corporation (CMI). M.H. Berlin, CMI’s founder, had purchased a few instrument lines to expand the company’s keyboard products department. Mr. Berlin’s son, Arnie, hired Michael to oversee that growing department. As it turned out, he was hired in the early 1970s, which was the beginning of the greatest sales boom the home organ has ever experienced. He stayed with the company when the name was changed to Norlin and later served as president. His NAMM Oral History was completed on June 7, 2007."

    https://www.namm.org/library/oral-history/michael-e-nugent
     
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  12. Hatefulsob

    Hatefulsob Senior Member

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    Why can't gibson get it right in the 21st century? We're not talking Amati violins here....solid guitars made in a factory 55 - 60 years ago, wtf? You can tool up a production line to build just about anything. The idea that you need a custom shop is complete marketing bullshit.
     
  13. Mick51

    Mick51 Premium Member

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    mea culpa. Regrets.
     
  14. kiko

    kiko Senior Member

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    IMO they did pretty well in those days. Its what they are doing now that's crap, I meant the managements aspects of it all.
     
  15. 1969 weatherman

    1969 weatherman Member

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    why not? Gibson back in the day was its own thing and was not influenced by forums and internet cork sniffers..they innovated thank god. the world would be boring otherwise.
    cheers
     
  16. riffsmachine

    riffsmachine Senior Member

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    They were simply considered guitars......:420:
     
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  17. Progrocker111

    Progrocker111 Senior Member

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    Actually they did it right with 68 and early 69 Customs. Still identical construction (except lower headstock angle) than 50s LPs, with nearly the same electronics and still good pickups. Most 68s arent heavier than 54-60 Customs. In 69 they gained overall in weight. 69 was the transition year and many construction changes occured progressively (3 piece neck, transitional tenon, first "pancake" layer just under maple cap and then in very late 69 full pancaked body and first small volutes).

    These late 60s Customs have a bit brighter and more focused tone (later Norlins even more) than 50s LPs, great for new music styles and playing techniques like hardrock, progressive rock etc. Dont forget, very big part of the great 70s rock music was played with late 60s and early 70s Les Pauls with great results. :dude:
     
  18. devin dude

    devin dude Senior Member

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    What happened is the guitar blew up with the Beatles , Stones , etc...

    By the mid Sixties Gibson & Fender saw huge expansion to meet demand.

    There were a lot of manufacturers flooding the market with cheap electrics

    Gibson wanted a slice of that pie , when Norlin took over it became much more about bottom line & profit
     
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  19. Mr Insane

    Mr Insane Senior Member

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    Personally, I don't see a problem with them relaunching with the P90s.
     
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  20. Dick Banks

    Dick Banks Senior Member

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    I was jamming around in the 1970s, and in the "garage band" scene, nobody cared about wood, flame, quality of finger board, etc. Really didn't care about the guitar at all. It was all about fuzz, high-gain amps (preferably solid-state) and speed. A friend and I traded back and forth two guitar amp heads; a Sears Silvertone, and a Kustom--one of those "pillow-top" heads. We felt like such losers because our amps had tubes in them. And they sounded terrible because (a) we couldn't really play, and (b) we pushed them through some cabinets we built at the high school woodshop out of walnut plywood and Radio shack 12 inch speakers.
    What I would give now to have either of those heads back, especially the Silvertone.
    I think people often confuse what "should have been popular" back in the day, to what really was popular. We just thought that Jimmy Page could just PLAY, without a lot of regard to the guitar he chose to play. And Hendrix really could care less about what pickup was in his strats, he just played the stock ceramics.
     
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