Why Do YOU Like Norlins?

Discussion in 'Norlin Years' started by Burny FLG, Jan 21, 2018.

  1. Burny FLG

    Burny FLG Senior Member

    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    162
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2017
    So being born in the early 60s, the objects I tend to gravitate towards are those from my formative years. I don't really have a connection with the 50s and by the 80s my tastes have formulated somewhat. I've always sought out in a pragmatic sense, tools to use rather than those which are too precious. This is an econonic rationale but somehow I don't feel the desire to accumulate, the want to create is much stronger. If I have enough money to afford some time to indulge in a creative pursuit that for me is all I want. The 60s and even the 70s LPs are mostly out of my price range and even though they are (better) as a tool than later ones I can't justify the cost. 80s LPs are at the end of the spectrum as far as the connection goes but I've shifted my criteria to accomodate them. As a tool to create the list is - firstly does the tone resonate with me? - that's something that can be tweaked but it has to be right to start with. Secondly - technically do all the electrics work? Is the action right for me, does it buzz anywhere? Etc quite simply does it function as it should so I don't develop any bad habits to accomodate an issue. Interestingly my LP is bright compared to my D28 so the tone journey has been to be working out how play the LP like an acoustic ie: get the dynamic range through the bass to the trebles. Amplification has added a large factor into this as it magifies nuances unheard in an acoustic (wolf notes in the bass for eg.) I've found humbuckers on another level in this sensitivity whereas single coils tend to be more forgiving. Last Friday night I decided to go back to using fingers as the attack on the strings with a plectrum was hard to control. (Never used a plectrum before but spent the last few months going down that path using increasingly softer plectrums to take some of the brightness out of the tone). I'm getting the sense that I can now control the brightness, have effective fingertip damping and like an acoustic, I can use my right hand to attain dynamic range. So back to topic, this lil 83 is $1000AU cheaper than a 70s version and performs like a sonic trouper. I think it's going to be a really good work horse, the rest is up to me to elk out the best tones it's got. If someone gave me a late 60s LP and it spoke to me I would use it as it was intended and not be precious about it but that's unlikely to happen. Would I choose it over the 83? If it was lighter possibly but hard to say.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. LPMarshall Hack

    LPMarshall Hack Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,704
    Likes Received:
    4,773
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2009
    Now THATS a paragraph!
     
  3. DarrellV

    DarrellV About as sharp as a bowlin' ball! -NPM Silver Supporter Premium Member

    Messages:
    17,133
    Likes Received:
    38,923
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2016
    Burny, ol' buddy... where do I begin.

    Like you my tastes were formed through my high school years and into my 20's. For me that was the 80's into early 90's.

    When i first met my sweetheart it was in 82-83 and I was in the Army stationed in Ft Lewis Washington state.

    I found it on a whim visit to a music store 3600 miles from where I live now, and back then i couldn't play my way out of a paper bag. I felt totally unworthy holding it in the music store.

    I lost it on layaway when I left the Army.

    Fast forward to 35 years later and Providence has put that guitar into my hands at last.

    In the years in between I have actually learned how to play.

    I bought this one on sight because of the beautiful colors. I never really played it.

    So when I got it I had to learn how to like it and bond with it. It felt alien compared to my Strat, very heavy and solid, and the skinny neck was hard on my hand.

    But I was committed to finding a way to adapt myself to it as needed and re-invent how I approached the guitar if need be. Giving it away again after 34 years was not an option.

    I had to learn to love it. Now I do. I've done some work to it to make it the way I want it and I'm very happy with the results.

    I've gotten more used to the thin neck over time and the gentle touch it takes to play it.

    I tweak it almost constantly.... adjusting pole and pickup heights and playing with the tone controls. I even modded the bridge tone pot with a resistor to take some highs off.

    Whatever it needs I will do because sale is not an option.

    These rewound Shaws sound heavenly and have really fired my desire to play.

    What I'm trying to say is, as the owner of an 82 I find them amazingly good instruments of as good or better quality as any era in Gibson history.

    A change of the pickups can get you the sound of the different time periods from the 50's forward. IMO the body shape and materials didn't change that much between them to affect how the neck feels, how it plays, the shape or balance. These are all fine points for us guys on the forum to discuss, but matter very little when you are sitting behind one playing it.

    There are many things that can be done for brightness. The easiest is to try pure nickle strings. The nickle alloy is not as bright as modern steel strings and were what would have been used in the olden days.

    Keep at it, keep playing. You have a fine instrument there. I mean it.

    As an owner of one I would definitely have bought one like yours if I was in the market. I like the color scheme and the year.
     
  4. DarrellV

    DarrellV About as sharp as a bowlin' ball! -NPM Silver Supporter Premium Member

    Messages:
    17,133
    Likes Received:
    38,923
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2016
    ^^^^^ Now there's ANOTHER paragraph! :laugh2:
     
  5. Burny FLG

    Burny FLG Senior Member

    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    162
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2017
    At least you put spaces between sentences.
     
    bulletproof, DarrellV and Streetglide like this.
  6. DarrellV

    DarrellV About as sharp as a bowlin' ball! -NPM Silver Supporter Premium Member

    Messages:
    17,133
    Likes Received:
    38,923
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2016
    LOL! Yeah, there is that.....:laugh2:
     
    bulletproof likes this.
  7. Jeremiah

    Jeremiah The Worst Premium Member

    Messages:
    3,055
    Likes Received:
    2,486
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2009
    I would say my first attraction was because of my birth year '76. Honestly now, though, it just seems weird for a Les Paul not to have the pancake body and 3 piece maple neck.
     
    bulletproof and cherrysunburst00 like this.
  8. Burny FLG

    Burny FLG Senior Member

    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    162
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2017
    Still experimenting with strings will try the nickel. Have you tried alloy? I used them on the acoustic and it evened out the range, were more like nylon in the feel but prone to breakage. Do they even make them for electric?
     
  9. DarrellV

    DarrellV About as sharp as a bowlin' ball! -NPM Silver Supporter Premium Member

    Messages:
    17,133
    Likes Received:
    38,923
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2016
    Electrics need some type of magnetic alloy to function. Nylon won't work. But I do believe there are hybrid phosphor wound electric strings now that I think about it.

    You may find a heavy gauge string better for finger picking too. They won't be as wobbly.

    EDIT: Actually acoustic strings will work as they have a steel core. There are also plenty of nickle alloy strings too. I just checked D'Addirio's website real quick.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2018
  10. DarrellV

    DarrellV About as sharp as a bowlin' ball! -NPM Silver Supporter Premium Member

    Messages:
    17,133
    Likes Received:
    38,923
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2016
    So you went after yours in a similar way as me. Not because you always played one in a R&R band or anything. It was more of, say, a novelty approach. In your case a birth date. In mine a color scheme.

    And I can assume you learned to like yours too?
     
  11. LPMarshall Hack

    LPMarshall Hack Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,704
    Likes Received:
    4,773
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2009
    And another, and another. And another...!!
     
    cherrysunburst00 and DarrellV like this.
  12. HardCore Troubadour

    HardCore Troubadour Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,423
    Likes Received:
    6,284
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Norlin are nothing special...do not buy them, especially Goldtops.....
     
    LPPILOT, dsmcl77, Pal and 9 others like this.
  13. Burny FLG

    Burny FLG Senior Member

    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    162
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2017
    I consider my neck to be low profile. Others have commented on how chunky it is which I think is strange it's definitely not a thin neck by any means, so if yours is anything like mine, your strat must have had a full profile.
     
    DarrellV likes this.
  14. TheZ

    TheZ Senior Member

    Messages:
    996
    Likes Received:
    609
    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    100% seriously, because they were all over the place in my favorite movie. There were several Deluxes, a few Customs, a few SGs, a few The Pauls, and even an L6-S or two. Also the reason I love guitars like the Ibanez Artist and Yamaha SG-2000. And CBS Fenders!

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Burny FLG

    Burny FLG Senior Member

    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    162
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2017
    Very cool
     
  16. 1981 LPC

    1981 LPC Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,165
    Likes Received:
    1,507
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Heavy, badly made, pancakes, maple necks, volutes, clown bursts.... what's not to like?
     
  17. Progrocker111

    Progrocker111 Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,347
    Likes Received:
    2,376
    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2011
    Most of my favourite (often lesser known) 70s progrock bands were using "new" Gibsons at that time, very often Les Paul Customs and Deluxes, so naturally when i want to be tonewise in the same ballpark, i grab for Norlins. :dude:

    Beside that, i prefer brighter, articulate, aggressive and still full sounding Les Pauls with tight bass and especially early 70s Customs deliver me the tone and feeling i like and i am after.
     
  18. Becker34

    Becker34 Senior Member

    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    468
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2017
    I got both of my LP's in the mid-late '80's, at the end of the Norlin era. I like my Norlins because:
    - They say "Gibson" and "Les Paul" on the headstock.
    - They make Les Paul-like noises. Even when I play them.
    - I like the way they play.
    - I got both for good prices that wouldn't be even thinkable today.

    As I've said elsewhere here, I didn't even know what the hell a Norlin was until I started coming here after I got my guitars back and started playing after a 10+ year layoff. I wanted to learn a little more about what I have.
     
  19. ARandall

    ARandall Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,994
    Likes Received:
    7,457
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2012
    Its hard to know where it comes for me. Of course I'm a child of the 70's (and early 80's) so perhaps there is that.

    But most of the music I enjoy has been made with vintage instruments, so that would counter the instinct.
    I'm also thinking that I instinctively seem to side with the underdog, or the lesser appreciated. I know a lot of people seem to think in a very black and white way.....as in if it doesn't conform to a certain ideal then it must be awful. Or they have a pack mentality - in that they seem to join a majority with absolutely no knowledge of the reality of the situation.
    I am not like that, so I appreciate the Norlin and CBS eras for what they are without the influence of prejudice......and the varied construction differences they have.
     
  20. kiko

    kiko Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,120
    Likes Received:
    1,268
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2015
    I agree! Because they are simply just Les Pauls! Its only later that we then to put into groups/eras where and when our LPs were made. A lot of these Norlins are good players and a lot more good music was made with them. :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2018
    Rotorhead, bulletproof and Becker34 like this.

Share This Page