Who Likes the Coil Tap Option, and How Often do You Use it?

Discussion in 'Gibson Les Pauls' started by scozz, Sep 30, 2017.

  1. RichBrew

    RichBrew Senior Member

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    I don't have any humbucker guitars with split coil pickups, but if I did then the option would be used all the time.

    The myriad tones available using both pickups and tone controls are wide ranging and appealing, but then I play a (Clapton) Stratocaster to do all that, anyway.
     
  2. Alderbeck

    Alderbeck Member

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    I like traditional 6 string guitars with either single coil or humbuckers or a mixture. I have never wanted push/pull switches, 7 string, 8 string or anything else. The only exception is a 12 string obviously or back when I could not afford a les paul I nearly bought a new Yamaha SG2000 which had the push/pull coil taps. I would have a kill switch buckethead got into that idea.
     
  3. ChrissDR

    ChrissDR Senior Member

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    Coil tap and coil spilt are two different things. Coil tap in standards. I think its only usable in ambient environment. On HP models, you can switch the tap to split. Thats a different beast. Sounds between single coil and p90.
     
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  4. Al Walker

    Al Walker Senior Member

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    I've had coil splits and they all went away. I'd rather have a dial-a-split, which rolls off a coil with the tone pot, loosing the tone control. Would work better with a master tone if you use it.
     
  5. gadgetfreak

    gadgetfreak Senior Member

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    I have an Epi with 50's wiring and 57 classics and when I play a chord and wiggle the pup selector back and forth it's extremely useful, almost like a kill switch with the effect it produces. My point in bringing this up is my 2016 Gibson Standard that has BB Pro's and coil split's, when I do this same maneuver and it's extremely weak so maybe it's because of signal being lost through all of this crap.
     
  6. Christosterone

    Christosterone Premium Member

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    Purple rain(ish) tone...
    I don’t mind it but can’t say I use it a lot...

    -Chris
     
  7. mobidevjc

    mobidevjc Senior Member

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    I like having the coil split as I think it sounds better than a coil tap on the Les Pauls I’ve compared with these features.

    I don’t use coil split too often, but it’s a nice feature to have. It’s just another tweak you can use to adjust your tone. It definitely helps to also have the boost as on the Trad Pro line as it helps make up for the lower output of split coils.
     
  8. Zhangliqun

    Zhangliqun Senior Member

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    All true, but then I'm a biased source. No volume drop, just a change in tonal character, and because you're still getting part of the other coil, there's a bit less noise than a regular split. Downside: You can't do series/parallel wiring with it because it's just 3-conductor.

    You CAN do phase switching and still keep the full Splat but you have to reverse the ground with the lead coming off the split(Splat) switch rather than just reverse ground and pickup main hot.
     
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  9. GibsonKramer

    GibsonKramer The Three G's Premium Member

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    Hate it.

    Never use it. Have one LP with it. My '14 Studio Pro.
     
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  10. C_Becker

    C_Becker Dat Gibson smell Premium Member

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    Had it in my Studio, never really used it. It always sounds like a thinner, crappier version of a humbucker to me. No comparison to a true single coil, like a P90 or Tele.

    Therefore, when I removed the PCB from my Studio (didn't like the taper on the volume pots at all), I didn't bother with push-pull pots.

    The only guitar where I still have the coil-split is my 7-string, and only because I can't be bothered to remove it.
     
  11. Veeing Fly

    Veeing Fly Senior Member

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    I got rid of mine. The pots, not the guitar.
     
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  12. Zhangliqun

    Zhangliqun Senior Member

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    I am the proprietor of the Splat option but still, as great as I naturally think the Splat idea is, in my view, if you have a pot to spare, the very best variation on this move is the Spin-A-Split. You can zero it in wherever you want it and it doesn't have to be the same every time. You can even plug a cord into the jack and measure it with the multimeter -- watch the DCR change as you turn the knob.

    Downside: With many (if not most) pots, the taper is such that it's difficult to get that sweet spot with quick sweep of the hand on the fly at the gig, or even just generally.

    Potential solution: Wire the pot to a switch so you can tweak it exactly where you want ahead of time so you get it where you want with the flick of a switch -- but still keep the option to vary it as much as you like. If your guitar's pot/switch farm is already too crowded and/or you just can't spare a pot, maybe a trim pot in the control cavity wired to a push/pull.
     
  13. mdubya

    mdubya Senior Member

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    Perfectly stated. :cheers2:

    If I want less output for a tone, I roll down the guitar volume. The audience certainly never notices a difference. Except that your tone might suck more when split or tapped. :p

    A split or tapped humbucker is never going to sound like a good strat neck pickup or a sweet P-90.

    ETA: potato spelling. :oops:
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017
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  14. Platte City Paul

    Platte City Paul Senior Member

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    I had my '94 rewired with taps for both pickups and a phase push pull. Like many others have said, the taps just seem to drop the output without making much difference in the sound. The phase switch is neat - kind of like what I imagine a wah pedal in one position would sound like.
     
  15. dspelman

    dspelman Senior Member

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    Gibson doesn't do a good job with coil taps. They never have. They've put them on there (since the late '70's) as a marketing thing, a checkbox, a bullet point. Single coils on an LP do pretty well (as those of us who have P90's can attest), but they need to have a certain output before they're really usable.

    They're really not something that you want to switch to in the middle of a song -- they do best when you set up the amp specifically for the single coil choice. I have a couple of preamps with built-in boost and four channels, and some of that makes a big difference. And modelers are easy to set up for single coil switching. But if you're one of those with two channels on a toob amp, it's a different story.
     
  16. dspelman

    dspelman Senior Member

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    It can. One of my favorite split pickups is a Carvin M22SD (about 13K) and there are a couple of 18K pickups that do really well. Mostly the problem is that people don't select pickups that work well and/or don't know how to use them effectively.
     
  17. mdubya

    mdubya Senior Member

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    Yeah but an 18k humbucker sounds like doodoo, so why not just a decent sounding single, skip the hb?
     
  18. Frozen Rat

    Frozen Rat Member

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    I buy Les Pauls so they will sound like Les Pauls. If I want a single coil sound I'll buy a Strat, or a PRS DC3, or a Telecaster and call it a day. I'm 100% with the people who say coil-tapped Les Pauls just don't sound quite right. They don't to me either. This is probably the major reason why I passed over buying a Standard and went to the reissues.
     
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  19. NotScott

    NotScott Silver Supporter

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    I like to keep my Gibsons wired more traditional. However, I have Bare Knuckles in my PRS wired to split with push pull pots. For my pop/rock gig, I am able to get good Les Paul and Strat sounds this way without having to screw with my amp nor change guitars in the middle of a song. That being said, I still find it a compromise to a two-guitar solution.
     
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  20. Liquid State

    Liquid State Premium Member

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    I had a 2013 Standard with this feature and never used it (eventually sold the guitar). I have a PRS McCarty with coil tap (swapped in Lollar Imperials) and use it all the time. Seems it was a check the box feature with the Gibby and was implemented as a useful versatility in the PRS (of course the Lollars help).
     

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