Where can I get music sheets in the web?

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by paco1976, May 23, 2017.

  1. paco1976

    paco1976 Senior Member

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    Hi all,
    I need to get music sheets (not tabs, sheets) for old jazz standards and all I see is webs where I have to pay for it.
    These sheets should old enough for not having copyright anymore...
    Do you have any link to a website that stores good quality music sheets?

    Thanks
     
  2. Brians Evil Twin

    Brians Evil Twin Poophoria Sōtō Zen V.I.P. Member

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  3. paco1976

    paco1976 Senior Member

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  4. Brians Evil Twin

    Brians Evil Twin Poophoria Sōtō Zen V.I.P. Member

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    In Boston the 70's you could buy the "Real Book" that had hundreds of lead sheets all properly notated with the correct changes for $40. The book was completely illegal because it violated copyright for every one of the songs in it. They were produced and collated on office copy machines and sold by word of mouth. It went through several "editions" as they added tunes.

    Eventually, the Hal Leonard publishing company negotiated the copyrights for most of the songs and made it all above board. You can now buy hard copies and CDs on Amazon. I bought all the CDs and still have my old original dog-eared illegal hard copy. But I won't copy and post them because well, I COULD PAY A HUGE FINE AND GO TO JAIL, THAT'S WHAT COPYRIGHTS ARE FOR.

    I should add that had the legal copies been available back then I would have paid for them. And so should you, this is how many musicians and their heirs make a living.

    Regarding "Mad About The Boy", it was published in 1932. Works published after 1922, but before 1978 are protected for 95 years from the date of publication. So MATB will be copyright-free in 2027, all you have to do is wait 10 years.
     
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  5. kevinpaul

    kevinpaul Premium Member

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    I heard you can get any thing you want on the web. I seen naked woman and passed all my pictures out .
     
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  6. Brians Evil Twin

    Brians Evil Twin Poophoria Sōtō Zen V.I.P. Member

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    FIFY
     
  7. spitfire

    spitfire Senior Member

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    I'm not sure what you mean by music sheets. You can get the set of Real books and get many hundreds of lead sheets for jazz standards. This is going to get you chords and melody (not words).

    Being jazz, there is never going to be a specific arrangement, for say guitar. At best you can get a transcription of recordings by a jazz guitar player like Joe Pass. Hal Leonard is the source for some of these.

    I couldn't even find "Mad About The Boy" in vols 1-3 of the Real Books. I did find it in a vintage "fake book" I have. My dad used to sell them in the early 50's and I have a copy.

    If it is an emergency, then suck it up and pay a few $$ and buy the sheet music. But remember, any sheet music you get (Real Book) or otherwise, is going to be someone's interpretation and arrangement. How true it is to the most common and generally accepted version is a crap shoot.

    In the jazz world, it's most common to listen to several version of a recording of a song, pick the one you like best, then figure out the chords and melody by ear. Assuming your ear is not well developed, you can make great use of tools like Transcribe! (a modestly priced program). With programs like this, you can slow music way down, loop over short sections, and even get it to guess at notes and even chords.
     
  8. huw

    huw V.I.P. Member

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    You could have a look at this :

    http://www.ralphpatt.com/Song.html

    It isn't lead sheets, just the changes, but it's a start...

    MATB isn't there though, but plenty of others are.

    :)
     
  9. paco1976

    paco1976 Senior Member

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    95 years then. I thought it was 50. That's why I cannot find it anywhere. I will have to either transcribe myself everything I need either buy it.

    Thanks

    Yes, I got the Real Books, I am missing a few tunes that is all.

    Well I've never had a problem in rock, blues etc but I've been into jazz the last 4 years and the chords can be tricky. Very often the chord are not played so clearly in some recordings which makes it hard to guess. Still working on it though.
     
  10. spitfire

    spitfire Senior Member

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    No question jazz chords tend to be more complex than rock chords. And I understand completely about the difficulty identifying a chord. Keep in mind that VERY often that chord choice was made by the musician at the time. Therefore, it doesn't necessarily represent that this is "the" chord that must be played.

    If you've been working on jazz for 4 years, you probably know what I mean. But for those reading this that might not be familiar, in jazz if a chord is written G7, you may very well be able to play any of several extensions G9, G11, G13 or of course altered chords Gb9, G#9 and so on. Then there are the substitutions where you might play a tri-tone sub (Db7) for the G7.

    Of course this all depends on the arrangement. If you are comping (playing rhythm) under a soloist, much more common to play the simpler version (G7) of the chord so your extension don't conflict with the soloist. And of course very common to NOT play the root note of the chord. That's what a bass player is for! And seems almost more common to NOT play the 5th then to play it, at least on guitar.

    While all these options can make your head swim, it also is why jazz has a lot of freedom. And within reason there is no right and wrong. Though there tend to be more common ways to play things and therefore certain expectations other musicians would would have about the chords of a tune.

    You haven't said why you need these songs. But if it is for you to learn them for yourself, you'll get the most out of it learning them by ear. It is hard at first, but it gets easier.

    There will be chords you won't quite get right, but so what? Unless of course you're creating some sort of reference for other musicians. One other thing about figuring out chords by ear, don't forget to listen to what the other instruments are doing. For example, you might be trying to figure out a chord, and it can help if you listen to what the solo trumpet player is playing over it.

    The guitar player may only be playing a very basic 3-note 7th chord (root, 3rd, 7th, no 5th) and the solo player my really be working the #9. If so, the actual chord may be a #9. And while a jazz bass player is seldom going to just be thumping on the root of a chord. It's still really common that the bass player will play the root on beat 1 (or the first beat of the change).

    Of course knowing what the common jazz chord progression are goes a long way. Just like with a simple blues, if you figure out the first chord is A7 (the I) you can be pretty sure you'll find the D7 (IV) and the E7 (V) in there. Of course with jazz it tends to be lots of 2-5-1's and 2-5's. Though often with temporary key changes. This again is where you'll get better at it pretty fast as you work through some songs by ear. Jazz is usually made up of a lot of very short chord progressions. I transcribed a song recently, I think there were something like 20 unique chords, and 32 different voicings. But really it was just 4 or 5, 2-5-1's or similar short simple progressions.
     
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  11. paco1976

    paco1976 Senior Member

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    I wanted to prepare some songs quickly with someone, just for rehearse and see later on what happens.
    It is going to be a bit delayed so now probably I will have the time to do as you say.

    You're completely right in all your points, I assume I have been a bit too much dependent on the Real Book.
    Regarding the chord changes, inversions, chord tensions etc, I am familiar with it, with basic chord progressions and so on. Recognize by ear all the chords in a song is still though. I have to walk that path... you never end with jazz, there is always something more to learn.
     
  12. spitfire

    spitfire Senior Member

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    paco, it's of course not wrong to use a Real Book, it's just better to use your own ears. That way you will develop faster. I can't recommend Transcribe! strongly enough. While the name implies that the program could transcribe, it cannot. Rather it just is a set of tools to make it easier for you. Mostly being able to single out and loop sections, slow them down, and it can figure out notes over short sections of music (a feature I'll use if I'm stuck).

    Also, learning to sing notes goes a long way to helping figure them out. I.E., sing note along to recording. Get that in your head, then sing note while you find it on the guitar. Again, it's a great way to more directly connect your ears and not rely so much on your eyes (reading music). There's even a school of thought that says even when you transcribe, don't write it down. I know this sounds bass ackwards, but the idea is to keep using your ears until it is ingrained. If you figure out a bar at a time, then write it down, you'll have a tendency to rely then on what you wrote down.

    Here's some links to some YouTube videos done by a jazz piano player Aimee Nolte. Most of what she talks about is general enough to be applied to all instruments. Her personality is very inspiring and she has many videos that provide some great insights to learning jazz.

    Figuring out chords in a song.



    Learning a song a week
     
  13. paco1976

    paco1976 Senior Member

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    That's a great input spitfire.
    I will check these videos and apply that to my routine.

    Good thing about jazz is that it's not about the instrument anymore, music is music, a piano player is as good teacher as anyone to teach you jazz guitar :)

    Thanks!
     
  14. Danomyte

    Danomyte Member

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    Yes. Her personality.
     
  15. Danomyte

    Danomyte Member

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  16. Sp8ctre

    Sp8ctre Senior Member

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    She has an ear I'll never have. I can't figure that $hit out for the life of me...even after an entire semester of Ear Training last year I can't do it...
     
  17. spitfire

    spitfire Senior Member

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    I hear you, I'm working on my ear, but sometimes I can't even determine which of two notes is the highest. And I'm probably too old to get much better. But, no one is born able to detect notes. It is learned, though of course it comes much easier to some than others.
     
  18. SteveGangi

    SteveGangi V.I.P. Member

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