When did Gibson stop using hide glue and old growth?

Discussion in 'Vintage Les Pauls' started by ElectricMagick, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. ElectricMagick

    ElectricMagick Senior Member

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    I couldnt find any info on this.
     
  2. Nevin1985

    Nevin1985 Senior Member

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    On Tuesday. You just missed it.
     
  3. jimi55lp

    jimi55lp Senior Member

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    Late 60s on old growth.
     
  4. dwagar

    dwagar V.I.P. Member

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    just a guess, '65/'66 when all the other changes started rolling in?
     
  5. JJ Blair

    JJ Blair Senior Member

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    So, you guys are saying that '68 and '69 LPs are not old growth?
     
  6. expo

    expo Senior Member

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    All the real old growth were long gone before 1900 but def. after WWII.
    I am sure the spanish armada had some nice mahogany ships. :D
    They maybe stored some old stuff, but most of it is a myth.
    They bought what was available. African, Honduran, whatever:slash:

    [​IMG]
    wikipedia
     
  7. golfernut

    golfernut Senior Member

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    what a shame
     
  8. JJ Blair

    JJ Blair Senior Member

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    Honduran mahogany would not grow in the maps areas, though. Would it?
     
  9. River

    River Senior Member

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    Have you tried? :laugh2:

    Srsly, this question needs some context. Parts and materials get set aside, misplaced, and even hidden. Then they're suddenly "found" and used. Sometimes because they're needed, sometimes because they're wanted by someone who rates consideration. :naughty:

    If you're trying to nail down the last certified "tone monster" to come off the line, it probably hasn't yet.
     
  10. Inside Guy

    Inside Guy I am no longer @ Gibson V.I.P. Member

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    How do you know this?
     
  11. sgberry

    sgberry Senior Member

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    :lol:
     
  12. LPCustom72

    LPCustom72 Senior Member

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    If we are talking about old growth mahogany - and Honduran at that - we need to find another source of information. As a parallel, there are still old growth forests in West Africa with their variants of mahogany.

    I do work in West Africa (and SE Asia - similar issues there with rosewood). I was in Ghana a few years ago along the western side of the country where the hardwood forests are located. We saw logging trucks heading for Accra (the capital and major port) with logs 8 - 10 feet in diameter. Mahogany is their only wood so doors, shool desks - everything is made from old growth woods. I have a cutting board bought in Mokola market for 50 US cents that is a single piece of rich brown mahogany.

    I believe the old growh forests in Honduras have been gone for a generation. The ones in West Africa will be gone in another generation.
     
  13. Shai`tan

    Shai`tan Senior Member

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    "They maybe stored some old stuff, but most of it is a myth."

    I seriously doubt that anyone who uses fine woods as a primary source would not have some serious stockpiles. Oh yeah, you can bet someone somewhere has been stockpiling.
     
  14. OldBenKenobi

    OldBenKenobi Senior Member

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    That picture depresses the hell out of me. :(
     
  15. jimi55lp

    jimi55lp Senior Member

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    I read on a forum a while back that Gibson stopped using their old growth stock on the regular production line in or about 1967.
     
  16. ElectricMagick

    ElectricMagick Senior Member

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    Srsly, this question needs some context. Parts and materials get set aside, misplaced, and even hidden. Then they're suddenly "found" and used. Sometimes because they're needed, sometimes because they're wanted by someone who rates consideration. :naughty:

    If you're trying to nail down the last certified "tone monster" to come off the line, it probably hasn't yet.[/QUOTE]

    I was just looking for a general timeline. I was looking at some 60's-80's LP's and was wondering when Gibson stopped using the 50's manufacturing techniques.


    Also, how can you tell the difference between old growth and newer mahogany from the grain shape?
     
  17. weirdotis

    weirdotis Senior Member

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    From researching and looking at the weights of many LSLPs, I personally don't think they are old growth, but I would love to be proven wrong of course.

    Which is not to say it's not good wood- take for example an exceptional modern R9.
     
  18. sgberry

    sgberry Senior Member

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    Old growth wood is myth. This was explained by Inside guy long time ago.
     
  19. jimi55lp

    jimi55lp Senior Member

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    By mth, you mean it's not important or over rated? I don't understand what Inside Guy could have proved or explained about old growth wood unless he said 68/69 LPs were not old growth?
     
  20. Liam

    Liam V.I.P. Member

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    There's a lightweight but quite hard feel to old Gibson mahogany. I've got a '64 Firebird I in for some work at the moment, and it has definitely got the right feel about it. Weighs very little, and is incredibly resonant. Not played enough late 60's Gibsons to know when it changed, but it definitely changed.

    Liam
     

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