What's going on with this neck?

Discussion in 'Epiphone Les Pauls' started by Esteban Verde, Aug 18, 2017.

  1. Esteban Verde

    Esteban Verde Junior Member

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    I just got my new Les Paul Traditional Pro and the neck/headstock area has weird discoloration on it (see picture). It almost looks like it was reattached. Does anyone have guitars that look like this or an idea of what's going on here? I would just exchange it, but Desert Bursts are backordered until February. IMG_20170814_172553919_HDR.jpg IMG_20170813_183735484.jpg
     
  2. DarrellV

    DarrellV Almost 1 Year old this month! Premium Member

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  3. DarrellV

    DarrellV Almost 1 Year old this month! Premium Member

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  4. Esteban Verde

    Esteban Verde Junior Member

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    Thanks for the reply. That was what I was thinking (and it makes me feel better). I was a bit concerned because it appears to be jagged. Most of the joints I have seen look like the one you posted (more rounded and intentional looking). Hard to tell if it's just a bad stain job
     
  5. DarrellV

    DarrellV Almost 1 Year old this month! Premium Member

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    Not a bad stain job, but the natural result from staining two different pieces of wood.
    Different grain pattern and hardness affects stain penetration, and the woods own darkness affects it too.

    the unevenness of the join is just from how they sanded it after assembly.

    some overlap on the edge of the join, but if it's smooth to the hand, that's what they were going for, I'm pretty sure.
     
  6. Bobby Mahogany

    Bobby Mahogany Senior Member

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    Darrell said it all!

    Enjoy your guitar!
    :thumb:
     
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  7. Rocco Crocco

    Rocco Crocco Senior Member

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    The joint looks uneven in the first pic.... not sure if it's because of the angle of the photo.
     
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  8. Esteban Verde

    Esteban Verde Junior Member

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    Yes, it definitely looks uneven in person. Here is another closeup pick. I have a special ii with a joint, but it looks completely even IMG_20170818_144225908.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2017
  9. PierM

    PierM Premium Member

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    The scarf joint happen with wood blocks then its modeled and sanded to final shape.

    This looks just like an asymetric sanding, or they just overdone the sanding on a side. Its not the stain.
     
  10. chasenblues

    chasenblues Senior Member

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    Or possibly the very tip of the joint broke off and it was sanded/finished anyway?

    Found a couple pics of another Epi with an oddly shaped/finished scarf joint.
    DSC_0142.jpg DSC_0144.jpg
     
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  11. PierM

    PierM Premium Member

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    It's pretty common on epiphone, to show a flattish transition between headstock and first part of the neck, around the back of the first fret. I've seen many modern epiphones with a bit messy transition like the OP or that last pic you posted...and with such flattish transition is very hard to produce a perfect joint line. It's also an odd way/zone to make the joint, which usually happen a bit earlier, and reversed, and this would help a lot limiting such visual jaggies.

    If you look at the OP picture, you see there is that flattish area just where there is the angled seam.

    I could be wrong, but really, it's something I would expect in a such sloppy transition between the head of the headstock and the neck rounded shape.
     
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  12. Rocco Crocco

    Rocco Crocco Senior Member

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    I know everybody is different, but that would bother me, just because it is so obvious.
     
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  13. Esteban Verde

    Esteban Verde Junior Member

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    It definitely bothers me a little. The question is do I just learn to live with it (the top is beautiful) or do I return it and wait to get a new one that's hopefully not as sloppy?
     
  14. DarrellV

    DarrellV Almost 1 Year old this month! Premium Member

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    IMHO you play the front. That's what you and the crowd sees.

    That ugly joint is like the brake shoes on your car. They are there, they do a function, but they are not a glam item. The chrome wheels in front of them are...

    If its smooth to the hand it will not impair your playing, and from the other samples shown and mentioned this looks fairly common, so you have to ask yourself if its worth the gamble to toss a top you love and I assume a guitar you like the feel and sound of, for another one that is likely to have similar issues and maybe worse in the areas of play and feel...
     
  15. chasenblues

    chasenblues Senior Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  16. PierM

    PierM Premium Member

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    What Darrel said.

    If you can't live with that, I would suggest to return the guitar and go for a darker, or solid, finish. It's hard to find a perfect curved joint if this is happening in a transition between a flat surface (headstock back) and a rounded profile.

    You see here, a Standard Pro, with similar issue;

    [​IMG]
     
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  17. DarrellV

    DarrellV Almost 1 Year old this month! Premium Member

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    Ahh, I thought about that too, Chasen! :cheers2:

    That's why I said SHOES! LOL!!! :thumb:

    'Cause I knew they made sexy calipers...... :laugh2:
     
  18. DarrellV

    DarrellV Almost 1 Year old this month! Premium Member

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    +1 :thumb:

    That's exactly what I mean... it seems to be fairly common.

    So taking that part out of the equation what else do you like about this guitar (you mentioned the top), that you might lose out on in a trade for a better neck joint?
    Which, BTW, doesn't look like it's gonna happen....
     
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  19. Bobby Mahogany

    Bobby Mahogany Senior Member

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    At that price point, we can't expect perfection.
    Even most Gibson's show some imperfection somewhere.

    Trying to get a seamless looking scarf joint isn't worth the effort in my opinion,
    if the rest of the guitar is fine and you enjoy playing it.
    Spend some time playing and if it still bothers you at night and keeps you awake,
    return it and buy a Gibson! Then take it to a luthier right off the bat to have it adjusted.
    :D
     
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  20. Money f'Nuthin

    Money f'Nuthin Junior Member

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    I have to agree with this 100%.
     

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