What else did Norlin own? "Another Quality Product from Norlin"

Discussion in 'Norlin Years' started by Charlize, Dec 8, 2017.

  1. Norton

    Norton Senior Member

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    It looks exactly like the pics in the previous post. Funky 8” speaker with the rotating baffle. But it sounds great on slow. Esp if you feed it with a little trem!!!
    S P A C E is the place !!
     
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  2. ehb

    ehb Chief Discombobulator Premium Member

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    Here's my Legend A30....

    LegendA30.jpg
     
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  3. Donal

    Donal ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Premium Member

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    They also owned Pearl Microphones:

    pearl norlin.JPG
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2017
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  4. Norton

    Norton Senior Member

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    Whoa!!?? Never ever have I seen a pearl mic. Pearl guitar fx? Oh yes. I like those very much...but mics!??
     
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  5. Leña_Costoso

    Leña_Costoso Senior Member

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    From Wikipedia:

    In 1969, ECL, a South American beer and cement company, acquired a majority of CMI shares, and the two companies merged in July of that year. The new company was renamed Norlin Corp (a portmanteau of the names Norton Stevens of ECL and Arnold Berlin of CMI.

    Why is it that anytime I hear about any sort of alcohol, cement, and doing business in Chicago, I think of cousin Al Capone.
     
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  6. DarrellV

    DarrellV About as sharp as a bowlin' ball! -NPM Silver Supporter Premium Member

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    I was still trying to verify the Pearl Drum ownership, but it looks like you found the proof. :thumb:

    If they owned the brand name whether its drums or mics, they owned it..

    Pearl mics? Maybe it was a European market? :dunno:
     
  7. DarrellV

    DarrellV About as sharp as a bowlin' ball! -NPM Silver Supporter Premium Member

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    :lol::lol: :thumb:
     
  8. radiomatts

    radiomatts Senior Member

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  9. moreles

    moreles Senior Member

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    Norlin history is confusing. It is generally described as an international conglomerate, which means a mix of enterprises bought as potentially profitable investments, not through any special commitment or expertise in the workings of the subsidiaries themselves. But we also find that Maurice Berlin and somebody else (names combine to make "Norlin") were the directors, and Berlin was reputedly something of a music industry figure. Regardless, most of Norlin's moves for Gibson are clearly directed towards cost control (often, overbuilding to avoid warranty claims) mixed in with knuckleheaded "innovations" intended to move the brand forward. Much of what was done is simply industry standard for the period, which is a low point for Fender as well, and Martins from that time are not very exciting either; some of it is excellent (consider the L6S, for instance); some of it is deficient and crappy. Perhaps Norlin's cement and beer were better than their Gibson guitars -- I dunno. But I think it's clearly wrong to look at this as some insidious, disastrous period of Gibson history, because it was sort of par for the course at the time, allowed the company to survive, and actually produced lots of popular guitars, some really good ones (and some insane crap). But, ultimately, Norlin had no underlying expertise in guitars, or musical merchandise, and ultimately shed Gibson when it was unable to run it as a good, exciting, profitable company. And they screwed the union and employees in the process.
     

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