Were DeLuxe's more commonplace in the UK in the 70s than other Les Paul's?

Discussion in 'Norlin Years' started by Angus Blackmore, Nov 4, 2017.

  1. scalino65

    scalino65 Junior Member

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    Hi. I’m also in the uk and love norlins. Seems to me that there are Loads of delux models, many converted to humbuckers. Not many standards but a fair few black customs. Sadly for me I can’t find a decent white custom anywhere!
     
  2. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Senior Member

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    Given the right rig, minis can sound every bit as full-bodied as their larger brethren. And "unsustainy" Norlins ... :rolleyes: Minis had no problem with sustain, in my experience.

    Furthermore, Norlins are generally disliked (by the 'sniffers) because of many design changes, not just the pickups. These include multipiece bodies, larger headstocks, multipiece necks, and volutes -- all characteristics of all Norlin-era Pauls, not just DeLuxes.

    Do you honestly think people were so dumb they couldn't see the difference?
     
  3. grumphh

    grumphh Senior Member

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    All i can say is that i love my two Norlins, but that i am happy that someone routed my '71 for full size humbuckers before i got it.

    Minihums don't sound like full size humbuckers unless you play at dirstortion/volume levels that would make any pickup sound like "rock"...
    Try to play clean on them and they sound like someone biting an eggslicer.

    And yes, i know that some 70's rock bands used minihums, but that doesn't make the tone classic in any way. They just played loud and were known for their songs rather than their tone.
    The classic Les Paul recordings that made everyone want LP's were made with old PAF equipped LP's and that was the sound people thought they were getting when they bought LP's in the 70's and just couldn't achieve with minihums.
     
  4. Progrocker111

    Progrocker111 Senior Member

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    I think that many "modern at that day" 70s and late 70s players (especially from rock, hardrock and progrock bandwagon) wanted more focused, direct and aggressive tone that especially Customs with T-Tops delivered quite ideal. Deluxes could be suitable too in these situations, because Bursts can be sometimes too fat and unfocused sounding in hardrock or speedy fusion soloing.
     
  5. grumphh

    grumphh Senior Member

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    I won't be guessing at what players "wanted" back then - but i am pretty sure that the vast majority of guitar players didn't even know that the pickups in the deluxes were not the same as were used in the original LP's. Electric guitars were still just beyond the novelty phase* and not something that everyone knew the technical specs to in the way we do today.


    But, looking at the number of routed deluxes, a lot of players figured out that the pickups were the culprit when they didn't get the tone they expected after having bought the rather expensive guitar of their dreams :D

    And of course the routing phenomenon (and the emergence of "hot" aftermarket piclups) is the empirical evidence one should look at before claiming that minihumbuckers are or were some sort of desirable pickup.
    Minihums have a sound all their own, that can be useable for some stuff, but no matter how much people claim it, it ain't no traditional LP sound.



    * Just beyond the novelty phase, owning electrics was getting more common, but still not as ubiquitous as it has been for the past 20 years - Remember, back in the early 70's The yearly output of LP's (all models) was still lower than a weeks output from modern Gibson... And Gibsons were the most expensive you could get, a mystery dream guitar :D
     

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